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by Michael Dibdin

Download Medusa fb2, epub

ISBN: 0571216595
Author: Michael Dibdin
Language: English
Publisher: Faber & Faber; UNABRIDGED VERSION edition (August 7, 2003)
Pages: 280
Category: Thrillers & Suspense
Subcategory: Unfathomable
Rating: 4.3
Votes: 203
Size Fb2: 1971 kb
Size ePub: 1995 kb
Size Djvu: 1990 kb
Other formats: azw rtf lrf lrf


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FREE shipping on qualifying offers. After a decomposed body is discovered in an abandoned military tunnel, Inspector Aurelio Zen travels north to the Italian Alps to investigate.

If you are the type of mystery buff that is more comfortable with a character that is fully acquainted in past books, you will find this series to be a bit disconcerting to say the least.

Ships from and sold by Murfbooks. Only 5 left in stock (more on the way). If you are the type of mystery buff that is more comfortable with a character that is fully acquainted in past books, you will find this series to be a bit disconcerting to say the least.

MICHAEL DIBDIN Medusa Pulchra es amica mea suavis et decora sicut Hierusalem terribilis ut castrorum acies ordinata. Averte oculos tuosme quia ipsi me avolare fecerunt. Pulchra es amica mea suavis et decora sicut Hierusalem terribilis ut castrorum acies ordinata.

Medusa ( Aurelio Zen - 9 ) Michael Dibdin Michael Dibdin Medusa Pulchra es amica mea suavis et decora sicut Hierusalem terribilis ut castrorum acies ordinata. Averte oculos tuosme. Aurelio Zen - 9 ). Michael Dibdin.

Michael Dibdin (21 March 1947 – 30 March 2007) was a British crime writer who was famous for inventing Aurelio Zen, the principal character in 11 crime novels set in Italy. Dibdin was born in Wolverhampton, in the West Midlands of England. The son of a physicist, he was brought up from the age of seven in Lisburn, Northern Ireland, where he attended the Friends' School

Medusa is a novel by Michael Dibdin, and is the ninth entry in the popular Aurelio Zen series about an Italian police detective

Medusa is a novel by Michael Dibdin, and is the ninth entry in the popular Aurelio Zen series about an Italian police detective. When a group of Austrian cavers exploring in the Italian Alps comes across human remains at the bottom of a deep shaft, everyone assumes the death was accidental. But then the body is removed from the morgue and the Defence Ministry puts a news blackout on the case.

Dottore! How have you been? Where have you been?’. I’m just calling to find out whether anyone has been trying get in touch with me. Do you understand?’. sessing in manner, the janitor was remarkably quick on the uptake. Actually there has been someone. Was, I should say. I haven’t seen him for a few days. He came to my cubicle in the front hall and asked if I was responsible for the building. I said that I was, and he asked if that included th.

348 393 9028: MEDUSA. After the heated pool, the air was distinctly cool, even down here in the sheltered terraces above lake Lugano. He keyed in the number, then turned to face the hillside behind the villa. The land rose precipitously, the contours marked by the looping line of Via Totone and its accompanying homes and gardens. There was no one in sight.

Michael Dibdin’s veteran Italian police officer is back. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem.

Vintage Christmas Records.

Zen is back - and on the hunt for the truth about a crime that has long been dead and buried . . .When a group of Austrian cavers exploring a network of abandoned military tunnels in the Italian Alps come across human remains at the bottom of a deep shaft, everyone assumes the death was accidental - until the still unidentified body is stolen from the morgue and the Defence Ministry puts a news blackout on the case. And is the recent car bombing in Campione D'Italia, a tiny tax haven surrounded on all sides by Switzerland, somehow related? The whole affair has the whiff of political intrigue. That's enough to interest Aurelio Zen's boss at the interior Ministry, who wants to know who is hiding what from whom and why. The search for the truth leads Zen back into the murky history of post-war Italy and obscure corners of modern-day society to uncover the truth about a crime that everyone had forgotten.

Comments:

Andriodtargeted
There is no question in my mind that Dibdin was almost at the end of the road with his character Zen and that he was changing in the type of story he was experimenting with. From pure, if eccentric noir, to something different. A simple synopsis of his story would make it seem an almost banal mystery book. Yet Michael Dibdin manages to keep an aura of uniqueness in what really is a thematically simple tale presented in a complex and convoluted manner of three story lines.

If you are the type of mystery buff that is more comfortable with a character that is fully acquainted in past books, you will find this series to be a bit disconcerting to say the least. I find that I am not sure which Zen I feel most comfortable with but I do know that he is a worthy subject. In Medusa, Zen becomes less cerebral and the events of past history and their effect on present day affairs seem to challenge him more than in the past. Three crimes which may be connected, but not in way we would expect. An Italy that is unknown to the casual tourist beckons the reader, and of course, Zen. For a man who states that his name is Venetian and certainly loves that city, he seems to spend way too much time away from it without remorse.

Can't complain about the servings on this dish.
Nenayally
If Michael's Dibdin's prior Aurelio Zen mystery, "And then You Die", was a bit flaccid, he makes amends - big time - in "Medusa" - a hard-hitting, old-fashioned tale of conspiracy, deceit, love, and betrayal. As with all of Dibdin's work, the prose is beautifully crafted and elegant, and if the pace tends to meander at times in starts and fits and back alleys, this is, after all, Italy. Zen, too, is back in top form, free of the distractions of a dying mother and a budding love affair, instead and thankfully fully committed to cracking a baffling and increasingly ominous mystery.

The savvy Dibdin weaves this complex thriller obscurely, starting not with this discovery of the mummified corpse in an abandoned military tunnel in Italy's northern Dolomite mountain range, but with a series of vignettes of middle-aged Italians disturbed in varying ways by the discovery. In fact, roughly forty pages have turned until Zen even shows up, poking around the abandoned cave with the Austrian spelunker who originally found the body. What could have passed as a decades old accident takes on more sinister dimensions when the corpse is literally whisked away in the night by shadowy government officials, hooking Zen in the ultimate cold case complicated by never knowing exactly who can be trusted.

With its well drawn characters, engaging storylines, and authoritative settings, "Medusa" will remind loyal fans just how much Michael Didbin, who passed away last year, will be missed. If there is fairness in literature, perhaps he will gain the readership posthumously this prolific author so richly deserved while living.
Coirad
If the action in "And then You Die" could be deemed Zen's recuperation period after the devastating events of Sicily, "Medusa" demonstrates a Zen well again, and indeed up to his old unscrupulous tricks, but still feeling the pressures of his ordeal.

Dibdin concentrates more on his secondary cast in this police procedural involving the discovery by a group of Austrian spelunkers of the body of a soldier thought to have been killed 30 years earlier in a freak airplane accident. Dibdin excels in depicting the various Italian agencies scrambling to cover-up an affair they don't quite understand, but fully recognize as having the potential to disclose a little too much of their own corruptness. In addition Dibdin's psychological portrayals of the individual members of Medusa, the elite military force to which the dead man once belonged, smack with realism; I especially enjoyed lonely Gabriele who wants nothing more than to live in the world of his antiquarian bookstore---he reminded me of the "rat man" in "A Long Finish". In addition, Naldino, the socialistic restaurant owner gives new meaning to the term "confused anger" and Claudia is just as snakey as an aging femme fatale as the Gorgon of the title.
Intermingled within these portraits of the past, Medusa gives us glimpses of Zen harriedly and conscientiously boarding trains all over the north of Italy from Florence to Campione d'Italie near Switzerland. Obviously, he has not lost his doggedness or his world-weariness---he works through the quagmire of politicism as only an Italian can---he solves the case employing the most unorthodox methods while pursuing leads, chain-smoking and drinking enough coffee and grappa to fuel an entire Starbucks and receiving an unexpected "atta-boy" from his superior in the end. Something tells me that in a future installment, Gemma, the new lady in Zen's life, just may iron out some of his cynicism and infuse him with some enthusiasm that could, while letting his guard down, get him into some hilarious form of trouble. A pity she only has a cameo role in this one.
Nevertheless, it is so good to see Zen on the prowl again in a new well-paced story set against the backdrop of exquisite Italian scenery still somehow not tainted by the knowledge of what goes on behind the Italian government machine. I would love to see Zen on the silver screen--I'd even raise a glass of grappa to that!
Recommended to all Zen lovers. As with the other books in this series, this book is better read in the order in which it was written to get the most out of the on-going story line and characterizations of Zen and his friends.
Galanjov
The usual ingredients of the Zen series: Zen himself, mixed-up and uncertain of what he wants from life, people in high positions involved in cruel and inhuman acts against fellow humans, even against those close to them. I don't know how Italians react to these books but they depict Italy as a land where the laws are flouted with impunity by the very institutions that are supposed to enforce them. (British readers who feel superior and complacent are recommended to read John Le Carré to see what their own institutions may be capable of!) Dibdin's imagination guarantees plots of fiendish complexity that keep the reader on tenterhooks from start to finish.

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