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by Ellery Queen

Download The Tragedy of Y: A Drury Lane Mystery fb2, epub

ISBN: 0930330536
Author: Ellery Queen
Language: English
Publisher: Intl Polygonics Ltd (December 1, 1986)
Pages: 344
Category: Mystery
Subcategory: Unfathomable
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 317
Size Fb2: 1713 kb
Size ePub: 1454 kb
Size Djvu: 1968 kb
Other formats: doc lit rtf mbr


Ellery Queen and Drury Lane both exercise precise logic that leads to a single conclusion. Having been written in the early 1930s, the story unintentionally reveals details of everyday life that now seem foreign.

Ellery Queen and Drury Lane both exercise precise logic that leads to a single conclusion. This item: The Tragedy of X: The First Drury Lane Mystery (Ellery Queen Mysteries, 1932) (Drury Lane Mysteries). There's a problem loading this menu right now.

The Tragedy of y book. Naturally the authorities call in Drury Lane retired Shakespearean actor, matinee idol, master of disguise, and amateur sleuth. A mystery by Ellery Queen writing as Barnaby Ross featuring wealthy retired Shakespearean actor Drury Lane who consults with the New York Police Department helping them solve difficult cases using his powers of reasoning and observation. Set in New York City around 1930.

The Tragedy of X. A Drury Lane Mystery. The result of their supplementary labors was the creation of Mr. Drury Lane, an aged Shakespearean actor with wonderful sleuthing powers.

Drury Lane investigates a suspicious suicide and a family of mad Hatters. A ramshackle trawler, the Lavinia D rumbles into New York harbor with empty nets. When its crew spies something floating in the water, they drag it in, hoping for a profitable catch. Their prize flops on the deck, limp, cold, and bloody: the corpse of a man. His name was York Hatter, and he had disappeared from his house on the fashionable Washington Square several days before. He hadn’t left a note and he wasn’t carrying any money. The police assume he killed himself-but they are very wrong.

Dury Lane Mysteries: Book 2. Frederic Dannay, with his cousin Manfred B. Lee wrote under the pseudonym Barnaby Ross, but all of those works were subsequently reissued under the name of Ellery Queen, another joint pseudonym of the two men. Betterpdf. Canon EOS 5D Mark II.

Ellery Queen Retired Shakespearean actor Drury Lane solves a mystery from afar Born during intermission in a seedy New Orleans playhouse, Drury Lane has spent the better part of his life in the theater

November 19, 2017 ·. In The Tragedy of X, a man is poisoned in the middle of a crowded New York streetcar, and not one of the dozens of witnesses can provide any useful evidence. The police are stumped until they receive a letter from Lane, claiming to have solved the crime by reading newspaper reports  . Retired Shakespearean actor Drury Lane solves a mystery from afar Born during intermission in a seedy New Orleans playhouse, Drury Lane has spent the better part of his life in the theater

These books did not feature the character Ellery Queen as the protagonist. The Drury Lane novels are in the whodunit style. The Tragedy of X and The Tragedy of Y are variations on the locked-room mystery format.

These books did not feature the character Ellery Queen as the protagonist. They included three novels featuring "the governor's troubleshooter", Micah "Mike" McCall, and six featuring Captain Tim Corrigan, of the NYPD's Main Office Squad. The Tragedy of Y bears some resemblance to the later Ellery Queen novel There Was an Old Woman: both are about eccentric families headed by a matriarch.

The Tragedy of Y. 5 5 Author: Ellery Queen Narrator: Mark Peckham . Some bizarre things have been happening to the eccentric Hatter family. Naturally the authorities call in Drury Lane-retired Shakespearean actor, matinee idol, master of disguise, and amateur sleuth.

Drury Lane, a retired Shakespearean actor and amateur detective, investigates the poisonings of two members of the eccentric Hatter family

Comments:

Joony
This is the first of four whodunits featuring the deaf actor Drury Lane written by the two cousins who usually wrote under the pen name Ellery Queen (the Drury Lane novels originally used the pseudonym Barnaby Ross). The book features flamboyant characters (none more so than Drury Lane himself), a complex plot, and a devilishly clever solution, all hallmarks of Ellery Queen. Sharp-eyed readers who spot the the authors' sleight of hand may arrive at the solution fairly quickly, but they will still find this to be a fun read. I've been a fan of Ellery Queen mysteries ever since I first discovered them when I was in high school many years ago, but somehow I never got around to reading the three Drury Lane books, so I'm especially happy that they are now available on Kindle.
NiceOne
And with a slueth not nearly as eccentric or weird as EQ. Not to say Drury Lane is not a remarkable character. Completely deaf, but a master of lip reading and disguise with a flair for the dramatic, as would befit retired actor who sunbathes in the nude. Lane is reminiscent of Sherlock Holmes in his perception of subtle clues and in the drawing out of wispy linkages. The story and the characters are just not quite as sharp in this early effort by the authors as they would soon be in their early EQ books.
GoodLike
As promised
Mr.Champions
The book fell apart upon arrival.
Yozshunris
I think I've read every Ellery Queen novel at least twice, and as other reviewers here have pointed out, THE TRAGEDY OF X is one of his top performances from the period when he was the best fair-play detective story writer alive.

But if this is the best of the best of the Golden Age mysteries, may I talk a little about how that gold isn't all golden?

Drury Lane, master detective, makes deductions based on things like how a cigarette lighter works, or how late a man with a cold gets up in the morning. (I made these examples up to avoid spoilers; they're not in THE TRAGEDY OF X, but things like them are.) These simple observations save lives or find murderers.

BUT.

Drury Lane tells the police he has the first of three murders solved as soon as he hears about it. But he can't tell who the murderer is yet, because he's playing a dangerous game with the murderer, and has to time his revelations perfectly.

This is simply not true. If Lane had told what he knew at once, the lives of two other people would have been saved. As soon as the police began directing their attention to the murderer, all the facts about the murderer's history, which help even more to prove Lane's case, would easily have
come out.

Point 2:

The police are almost as stupid as police in the Philo Vance mysteries, and that's saying a lot. One simple fact makes it impossible for one particular suspect to have committed murder number two. The police know the fact, but they don't get it. A couple of lawyers miss the point too. Lane gets it, but in real life he would be far from the only one to see the meaning of that one simple fact. As soon as he points it out (it doesn't need any real explaining) everyone gets it; some of them even say things like, "How could I be so dumb?" Good question.

Point 3:

I'm not sure if this is a problem with Golden Age mysteries, or with society at large. The police method in this book is, consistently, to find a plausible suspect, try them for murder and see how things shake out. Every time they try someone or plan to try them ... turns out they're innocent. Tough luck, but they never abandon the method: pick a likely killer, try them, see how you do. Not surprising that recent DNA testing showed one out of six people on Death Row in Illinois were innocent. Hammett's THE MALTESE FALCON strongly indicates that the police are not above framing people, and so do many of the Perry Mason mysteries. So I can't say this kind of hit-or-miss railroading never happens, but it's sure scary to think about.

Point 4:

Drury Lane is a deaf actor, retired, wealthy, in good shape, who to my mind does not come across as a character. He is so good at acting that he can, no kidding, imitate a policeman, Inspector Thumm, in front of subordinates who have known him for years, and totally get away with it. If our lead character has such unbelievable skills, then the Golden Age mystery is more science fiction than crime fiction.

Nevertheless, all the clues are there, and Lane's deductions really will make you feel silly for missing obvious things. That's the fun of the Golden Age, and I love it still.
Agamaginn
The highly popular Ellery Queen mysteries in the 1930s, 40s, 50s, and 60s were penned by an author with the same name. It is as though the Sherlock Holmes mysteries had been authored by Sherlock Holmes, rather than Dr. Watson or Sir Conan Doyle. The actual identity of Ellery Queen (the author) was secret, until much to everyone's surprise, it was revealed that the author was actually two writers that jointly created these complex stories.
A few years after the the first Ellery Queen novels were published, a Mr. Barnaby Ross produced "The Tragedy of X", followed by Y and Z, and concluding with "Drury Lane's Last Case". Later the true identity of Barnaby Ross was unveiled as Ellery Queen. Confusing? The Ellery Queen and Drury Lane mysteries are catalogued under Ellery Queen in most libraries.
I have long been a fan of Ellery Queen. I am nearly always baffled by the mysteries. The characteristic conclusion, a detailed logical analysis revealing the solution, always amazes me. How could I have gone astray once again and not seen the obvious conclusion? On the rare occasions that I unravel the solution, I remain exuberant for weeks.
Drury Lane is an eccentric, retired Shakespearean actor of great intellect and great wealth and is sought out by New York City professional detectives (and the District Attorney) whenever they are baffled, like me. For those readers familiar with some of the more fantastical stories by Ellery Queen, it should be no surprise that Drury Lane inhabits an Elizabethan castle on the Hudson River. His close servant Quacey is an ancient hunchback, bald, bewhiskered, and wrinkled.
I enjoyed this Drury Lane mystery for many of the same reasons I admire other Ellery Queen stories. The clues are visible and yet invisible, the plot is intriguing, and the detective himself is fascinating. Ellery Queen and Drury Lane both exercise precise logic that leads to a single conclusion.
Having been written in the early 1930s, the story unintentionally reveals details of everyday life that now seem foreign. A weekly five dollar deposit to a savings account is evidence of frugal behavior. A doorman manipulates a speaking tube. The police awaken a sleepy elevator operator to pilot them up six floors. Longstreet, an early victim, paid bus fares for his ten guests with a dollar bill, and received change. A ten day period in the hospital for an appendix operation is considered a minimal stay. Dictaphones and carbon paper and typewriters are standard. Photographs and fingerprints are not faxed, but transmitted by a telephotographic device.
Mild ethnic slurs pepper the gruff Inspector Thumm's interrogation of witnesses. The medical inspector's dialogue includes liberal use of Ja and Nein and other Germanic words We meet Italians and Irish and Germans and others in New York, but hyphenated Americans had yet to be invented.
A final clue, interesting in itself but not essential for unraveling this mystery, is explained by the final word of the final sentence in the final chapter.

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