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by Ibn Battutah,Tim Mackintosh-Smith

Download The Travels of Ibn Battutah fb2, epub

ISBN: 0330418793
Author: Ibn Battutah,Tim Mackintosh-Smith
Language: English
Publisher: Pan Macmillan; New Ed edition (June 1, 2003)
Pages: 400
Category: Writing Research & Publishing Guides
Subcategory: Reference
Rating: 4.5
Votes: 113
Size Fb2: 1512 kb
Size ePub: 1119 kb
Size Djvu: 1961 kb
Other formats: docx azw lrf mbr


Ibn r, bigrapher, anecdotal historian and occasional botanist-was just 21 when he set out in 1325 from his native Tangier on a pilgramage to Mecca. He did not return to Morocco for another 29 years.

Ibn r, bigrapher, anecdotal historian and occasional botanist-was just 21 when he set out in 1325 from his native Tangier on a pilgramage to Mecca. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.

Tim Mackintosh-Smith. He did not return to Morocco for another twenty-nine years, travelling instead through more than forty countries on the modern map, covering seventy-five thousand miles and getting as far north as the Volga, as far east as China and as far south as Tanzania. He wrote of his travels, and comes across as a superb ethnographer, biographer, anecdotal historian and occasional botanist and gastronome.

Ibn Battutah described them as ‘men so eager to welcome strangers, so prompt . The book is about Ibn Battuta a resident of Tangiers (morocco), which I never knew, who travels across the middle-east and al. .

Ibn Battutah described them as ‘men so eager to welcome strangers, so prompt to serve food and to satisfy the wants of others, and so ready to suppress injustice and kill Tim Mackintosh-Smith's redaction and translation have been widely praised; it is well-informed and very readable. The book is about Ibn Battuta a resident of Tangiers (morocco), which I never knew, who travels across the middle-east and all the way across India all the way to China and back!

Also by Tim Mackintosh-Smith Yemen: Travels in Dictionary Land The Hall of a Thousand Columns: Hindustan to.Computers tend to treat my Ibn Battutah and Gibb’s Ibn Battuta as two distinct persons. They are, of course, identical.

Also by Tim Mackintosh-Smith Yemen: Travels in Dictionary Land The Hall of a Thousand Columns: Hindustan to Malabar with Ibn Battutah Landfalls: On the Edge of Islam from Zanzibar to th. The final h is a matter of taste, which is not among the criteria of electronic indexing.

Mackintosh-Smith Tim. Year: 2003. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. Travels with a Tangerine: A Journey in the Footnotes of Ibn Battutah. Mackintosh-Smith Tim. Year: 2012. File: EPUB, . 3 MB. 2. Travels and Adventures of Monsieur Violet.

Ibn Battutah set out in 1325 from his native Tangier on the pilgrimage to.

Ibn Battutah set out in 1325 from his native Tangier on the pilgrimage to Mecca. By the time he returned twenty-nine years later, he had visited most of the known world, travelling three times the distance Marco Polo covered. Tim Mackintosh-Smith's first book, Yemen: Travels in Dictionary Land, won the 1998 Thomas Cook/Daily Telegraph Travel Book Award and is now regarded as a classic of Arabian description. His books on Ibn Battutah's adventures in the old Islamic world and in India have all received huge critical acclaim.

Ibn Battutah – ethnographer, bigrapher, anecdotal historian and occasional botanist – was just . Connect with the author.

Ibn Battutah – ethnographer, bigrapher, anecdotal historian and occasional botanist – was just twenty-one when he set out in 1325 from his native Tangier on a pilgramage to Mecca. Tim Mackintosh-Smith.

Ibn Battutah thought, I can get a job there, being a card-carrying Arab Muslim . Tim Mackintosh-Smith on Travelling in the Muslim World Books.

Ibn Battutah thought, I can get a job there, being a card-carrying Arab Muslim scholar. It’s nonsense because he sort of explodes the usual narrative of the travel book – the narrative itinerary where you go from A to B, B to C and so on. Byron is all over the shop.

Ibn Battutah—ethnographer, bigrapher, anecdotal historian and occasional botanist—was just 21 when he set out in 1325 from his native Tangier on a pilgramage to Mecca. He did not return to Morocco for another 29 years, traveling instead through more than 40 countries on the modern map, covering 75,000 miles and getting as far north as the Volga, as far east as China, and as far south as Tanzania. He wrote of his travels, and comes across as a superb ethnographer, biographer, anecdotal historian, and occasional botanist and gastronome. With this edition by Mackintosh-Smith, Battuta's Travels takes its place alongside other indestructible masterpieces of the travel-writing genre.

Comments:

Thabel
I read something by IB years ago that was a straight-forward description of some ruins he visited. He mostly stated facts and avoided fantastical descriptions. So I read this book recently and enjoyed most of it. He seems to mainly write when he is travelling, but doesn't write much while he is staying somewhere (stayed in Delhi for years but not much mentioned). His descriptions of sites that still exist today are what I found to be the most interesting. I would look up pictures of these sites on google after reading IB's description. The book also has a map of IB's travels and lots of useful footnotes.
WinDImmortaL
I read this book in college a million years ago - it's such an amazing journey and I hope it inspires readers as much as it did me to explore the world,learn another language or two and love different cultures.
asAS
Quality translation of a fascinating read
Hanelynai
I have a particular affection for old travel books. I love Marco Polo and Richard Hakluyt, so I thought I’d try Ibn Battutah’s travel commentaries. His time on earth overlapped Marco Polo’s, so they are both exponents of the same Zeitgeist. But whereas Marco Polo was a Venetian Christian, Ibn Battutah was born in the Magrib (modern Morocco) and was a devout Muslim. These facts inform everything he writes. So, both Polo and Ibn Battutah visited China, but their perceptions are vastly different. Whereas Marco Polo was rather tight-lipped about sex, Ibn Battutah seems to have copulated his way across the then-known world with hundreds of slave girls, concubines, and temporary “wives.” He also left more than a few offspring in his wake. His trip lasted 29 years and was three times the length of Marco Polo’s. He writes about not only what he actually experienced, but also includes gossip, rumors, and legends about the things and the people he encountered. Some of it is rather horrifying. I quote this passage from his chapter “In the Country of the Blacks”:

“A group of these Blacks who eat the sons of Adam came to the Sultan Mansa Sulaiman with their amir. It is their custom to put into their ears big pendants, the opening of each pendant being half a span across. They wrap themselves in silk, and in their country is a gold mine. The sultan treated them with honor and gave them in hospitality a slave woman, whom they killed and ate. They smeared their faces and hands with her blood and came to the sultan to thank him. I was told that this is their custom whenever they come on an embassy to him. It was reported of them that they used to say that the best parts of the flesh of human females were the palm of the hand and the breast.”

Yikes!

Basically, Ibn Battutah’s sensibilities and mine are 180 degrees apart. I cite this passage as an example: “We came first to the country of the Bardamah, who are a Berber tribe. Their women are the most perfectly beautiful of women and have the most elegant figures; they are pure white and very fat. I have never seen any who are as fat as they. They feed on cows’ milk and pounded millet, which they drink mixed with water, uncooked, night and morning. Anyone who wants to marry among them settles with them as near to their country as possible and does not go with them further than Gawgaw and Iwalatan.”

I did not enjoy the book as much as Marco Polo’s, but I did find it compelling reading which provided a lot of food for thought. Four stars.
catterpillar
Beautiful edition of a classic. However, the book came with the dust jacket bumped and with pieces of I do not know what on the hard cover.
Ffan
great
CopamHuk
Excellent
this has a lot of history. Has to go with Marco Polo

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