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Download Empire of Scrounge: Inside the Urban Underground of Dumpster Diving, Trash Picking, and Street Scavenging (Alternative Criminology) fb2, epub

by Jeff Ferrell

Download Empire of Scrounge: Inside the Urban Underground of Dumpster Diving, Trash Picking, and Street Scavenging (Alternative Criminology) fb2, epub

ISBN: 0814727379
Author: Jeff Ferrell
Language: English
Publisher: NYU Press (December 1, 2005)
Pages: 222
Category: Social Sciences
Subcategory: Politics
Rating: 4.5
Votes: 439
Size Fb2: 1476 kb
Size ePub: 1891 kb
Size Djvu: 1155 kb
Other formats: rtf doc lit mbr


In December of 2001 Jeff Ferrell quit his job as tenured professor, moved back to his . The book covers an interesting subject and had some interesting parts

In December of 2001 Jeff Ferrell quit his job as tenured professor, moved back to his hometown of Fort Worth, Texas. The book covers an interesting subject and had some interesting parts. There were plenty of photos in the book that seemed odd to me. The book is set in Fort Worth and the book is full of photos of people in New York and I don't really know why.

Empire of Scrounge book. His books include Crimes of Style: Urban Graffiti and The Politics of Criminology. He lives in Flagstaff, Arizona. Books by Jeff Ferrell. Jeff Ferrell, a professor, albeit a rag picker, a dumpster diver, and a guy who lives off of the stuff other people leave behind brings sustainable living into sharp focus. Some might call him a nut, but I think of him as one of the real sustainable livers.

Empire of Scrounge : Inside the Urban Underground of Dumpster Diving, Trash Picking, and Street Scavenging. In December of 2001 Jeff Ferrell quit his job as tenured professor, moved back to his hometown of Fort Worth, Texas, and, with a place to live but no real income, began an eight-month odyssey of essentially living off of the street. Empire of Scrounge tells the story of this unusual journey into the often illicit worlds of scrounging, recycling, and second-hand living.

Home Browse Books Book details, Empire of Scrounge: Inside the Urban Underground. Empire of Scrounge: Inside the Urban Underground of Dumpster Diving, Trash Picking, and Street Scavenging.

Alternative Criminology.

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Jeff Ferrell, Professor of Sociology at Texas Christian University, is the author of Empire of Scrounge: Inside the Urban Underground of Dumpster Diving, Trash Picking, and Street Scavenging (2005

Jeff Ferrell, Professor of Sociology at Texas Christian University, is the author of Empire of Scrounge: Inside the Urban Underground of Dumpster Diving, Trash Picking, and Street Scavenging (2005; ISBN 978-0-81472-738-6). Cory Doctorow integrated garbage picking characters into the plots of his novels Someone Comes to Town, Someone Leaves Town and Pirate Cinema.

Essay first published in The American Sociologist, May 1968. Theoretical Criminology 11(1) Packard, V. (1967 ) The Waste Makers. Harmondsworth: Penguin. Sayers, D. (1948) Creed or Chaos? And Other Essays in Popular Theology. The Religious Book Club. Essay first published 1942 Waste and Want: A Social History of Trash. London: The Religious Book Club.

In "Empire of Scrounge," Jeff Ferrell serves as an unassuming guide into . Save on Non-Fiction Books. Trending price is based on prices over last 90 days.

In "Empire of Scrounge," Jeff Ferrell serves as an unassuming guide into the netherworld of our own garbage. Outstandingly well written, gripping, and hugely entertaining. Current slide {CURRENT SLIDE} of {TOTAL SLIDES}- Save on Non-Fiction Books.

“Patrolling the neighborhoods of central Fort Worth, sorting through trash piles, exploring dumpsters, scanning the streets and the gutters for items lost or discarded, I gathered the city's degraded bounty, then returned home to sort and catalogue the take.”—From the Introduction

In December of 2001 Jeff Ferrell quit his job as tenured professor, moved back to his hometown of Fort Worth, Texas, and, with a place to live but no real income, began an eight-month odyssey of essentially living off of the street. Empire of Scrounge tells the story of this unusual journey into the often illicit worlds of scrounging, recycling, and second-hand living. Existing as a dumpster diver and trash picker, Ferrell adopted a way of life that was both field research and free-form survival. Riding around on his scrounged BMX bicycle, Ferrell investigated the million-dollar mansions, working-class neighborhoods, middle class suburbs, industrial and commercial strips, and the large downtown area, where he found countless discarded treasures, from unopened presents and new clothes to scrap metal and even food.

Richly illustrated throughout, Empire of Scrounge is both a personal journey and a larger tale about the changing values of American society. Perhaps nowhere else do the fault lines of inequality get reflected so clearly than at the curbside trash can, where one person's garbage often becomes another's bounty. Throughout this engaging narrative, full of a colorful cast of characters, from the mansion living suburbanites to the junk haulers themselves, Ferrell makes a persuasive argument about the dangers of over-consumption. With landfills overflowing, today’s highly disposable culture produces more trash than ever before—and yet the urge to consume seems limitless.

In the end, while picking through the city's trash was often dirty and unpleasant work, unearthing other people's discards proved to be unquestionably illuminating. After all, what we throw away says more about us than what we keep.

Comments:

Anarasida
The book covers an interesting subject and had some interesting parts. There were plenty of photos in the book that seemed odd to me. The book is set in Fort Worth and the book is full of photos of people in New York and I don't really know why. I wouldn't recommend this to the average person, but if the subject interest you, you might find it interesting. I likee when he talked about his scrounging and the people he met and the things he found. I found the philosophical flights of fancy a little boring to be honest.
Delalbine
My husband loved it.
Mitynarit
Not what I expected. Other reviewers have touched on my primary complaints: annoying tone / attitude and much of the writing does seem like filler. I suppose I expected a "grittier" tome, perhaps, but it was just not what I anticipated.
Kanek
The author's choice of words and the way his writings flow make it a difficult read, best taken in small bites. It doesn't read easily like Scratch Beginnings or How to Survive Without A Salary. Keep a dictionary close by while reading. I really enjoyed the book but I wasn't able to tear through it as quickly as I would have liked.
Loni
An interesting and quite relevant topic. You won't be disappointed.
Manris
This guy chastises society for throwing away perfectly good oven knobs, pictures of people we dont have a clue to as to who they are and the like. Imagine us! Not respecting and saving perfectly good items like that! Puh-leeeze. This guy finds it sinful that people throw pictures out! The only redeeming thing about this book are the stories about the ultra-wealthy's waste. Which I even admit were eye-opening. But other than that it is just another case of one of the U.S.'s uber-liberal college professors ranting against capitalism and consumerism. What most of these clowns fail to realize is that time is money and garbage is garbage. That and the fact that he himslef seems to have no use for much of the junk he himself collects. He stores a huge assortment of these gee-gaws in a storage shed in his backyard with no idea of when or if he'll ever use them. These types like to force recycling on everyone without regards to if anyone even wants or needs the trash we are now being forced to recycle. Most dont realize that there is no real market for most of the paper goods we are forced to recycle in most cities nowadays and it ends up in the landfill anyway!
nailer
I discovered this book while I was visiting Fort Worth in December of 2005, after a job had ended and I made my default pilgrimage to see my parents. During those strange days of bright warmth unusual even for Texas, I drove streets and haunts Ferrell describes with piquant accuracy: the sheet metal fences of Rosedale's scrap metal yards, the deep green live oak shade of middle-moneyed Ridglea and Arlington Heights, the gravel alleys and nondescript shacks of urban backyards--one of which hid his illegal recycling operation under pecan trees. While I was in college I lived some of this life, picking up abandoned car batteries and random lumps of metal, dumping rancid soda out of the cans left in the lone recycling barrel I set up at my college, even fishing appliances out of creeks--hauling it all to those same metal yards for respectable pocket money.

Ferrell's opening chapters clearly appeal to academic readers, describing the social relationships between waste, the higher social orders that discard it, and the proles and lower that rely on it for income. But the heart of the book is his account of becoming a scrounger. He moves outside his privileged Texas Christian University position to ride a bicycle through Fort Worth's neighborhoods, where he learns to surreptitiously paw trash. That strange, pregnant pause when a homeowner finds him digging through a curbside pile, and then offers to bring out even more and better stuff, is both a sublime human moment and an examination of our relationships to each other and to physical things, through the lens of class.

Ferrell's questions and judgments are even and respectable, but no less challenging because of it. Why must he hide his backyard recycling operation from city code enforcement, when it reduces the trash doomed to landfills, and saves perfectly good stuff? What does it say about our society that the city government will pay a nickel bounty on abandoned bottles and cans, thus recruiting the homeless as cheap cleanup labor?

In the end, Ferrell's account of scavenging, our relationship to stuff and our ease in parting with it, and the distance we maintain from those sustained on it, leaves the reader to ask who we are and who we are becoming. As I wonder what happened to the Yankee thrift of my grandparents and how the country will ever pay its many debts, I am there with Ferrell, pulling out treasure, confused by its designation as trash.
Ha! Just kidding, found it under the Christmas tree where my wife placed it, but someday some lucky scrounger will find it(not my copy) in a used bookstore Dumpster and it will smite them upon the pate with the serendipidous force of a Zen koan.

It's a philosophical look at a life lived on the margins of society, with great attention paid to the ambiguities of public/private property, the ever changing cultural definition of criminal behavior/thriftiness.

I loved the section where the author discussed the flip side of the canard,"Time is money." If you opt out of the commercial world of money and consumerism then the pace of your life slows way down and you become firmly rooted in the here and now.

Along the way Ferrell introduces the reader to some very savy scroungers. Listen to Leslie Hemstreet of Chadron Nebraska:

"There's nothing that makes you feel a temporary merging of the parallel universes more than being a vegetarian driving around with a dead deer on top of your truck, getting kudos from yokels for poaching. We really won the admiration of those with whom we were able to share the truth. 'Poaching? Hell no. Roadkill'"

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