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Download Making Good: How Ex-Convicts Reform and Rebuild Their Lives fb2, epub

by Hans Toch,Shadd Maruna

Download Making Good: How Ex-Convicts Reform and Rebuild Their Lives fb2, epub

ISBN: 1557987319
Author: Hans Toch,Shadd Maruna
Language: English
Publisher: Amer Psychological Assn; 1 edition (October 1, 2000)
Pages: 211
Category: Social Sciences
Subcategory: Other
Rating: 4.8
Votes: 429
Size Fb2: 1552 kb
Size ePub: 1483 kb
Size Djvu: 1889 kb
Other formats: lrf lit doc rtf


Making Good: How Ex-Convi. has been added to your Cart. Dr. Maruna shows these ideas are wrong. Since desisters and persisters differ in the realm of self-efficacy, not in morality, confronting criminals is a waste of time.

Making Good: How Ex-Convi. Maruna dismisses clinicians who believe that for criminals, "incriminating themselves is in their own best interests. Rather than trying to get criminals to become good, we need to focus on helping them feel effective. The question then, is how to promote self-efficacy.

to investigate how ex-convicts make sense of their lives and manage to ‘go. straight’ after several years of. .Indeed this book has many amazing and touching. stories about how ex-prisoners overcame a life of crime and drugs. straight’ after several years of persistent offending Indeed this book has many amazing and touching. offers readers a glimpse of hope in that there are successful cases where.

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PDF Based on the Liverpool Desistance Study, this book compares and contrasts the stories of ex-convicts who are actively involved in criminal. Download full-text PDF. Making Good: How Ex-Convicts Reform and Rebuild Their Lives. How we measure 'reads'.

Making Good is based on interviews with approximately sixty men and women with histories of petty crime. Only occasionally did my telling clients how to solve their problems do any good. Half had quit crime, half were still at it. The interview transcripts ring true. In my best groups the group members came up with their own answers to questions raised by their peers. My job was to make it safe for them to discuss problems and come up with their own answers. I believe that my ideas for solutions were consistently better than theirs, but the ideas the group came up with were their own.

If only it were all so simple! If only there were evil people some- where insidiously committing evil deeds, and it were necessary only to separate them from the rest of us and destroy them.

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Can hardened criminals really reform? "Making Good" provides resounding proof that the answer is yes. This book provides a fascinating narrative analysis of the lives of repeat offenders who, by all statistical measures, should have continued on the criminal path but instead have created lives of productivity and purpose.

Can hardened criminals really reform? Making Good provides resounding proof that the answer is yes. This book provides a fascinating narrative analysis of the lives of repeat offenders who, by all statistical measures, should have continued on the criminal path but instead have created lives of productivity and purpose. This examination of the phenomenology of "making good" includes an encyclopedic review of the literature on personal reform as well as a practical guide to the use of narratives in offender counseling and rehabilitation. The author's research shows that criminals who desist from crime have constructed powerful narratives that aided them in making sense of their pasts, finding fulfillment in productive behaviors, and feeling in control of their future. Borrowing from the field of narrative psychology, Maruna argues that to truly understand offenders, we must understand the stories that they tell -- and that in turn this story-making process has the capacity to transform lives. Making Good challenges some of the cherished assumptions of various therapy models for offenders and supports new paradigms for offender rehabilitation. This groundbreaking book is a must read for criminologists, forensic psychologists, lawyers, rehabilitation counselors, or anyone interested in the generative process of change. You may also be interested in: Treating Adult and Juvenile Offenders With Special Needs Violent Offenders: Appraising and Managing Risk

Comments:

Mananara
I was a psychiatric social worker in prison and parole mental health settings for eighteen years. During my first few years working at prison, I searched for guidance in the literature on therapy of criminality. I found little. The literature then available -- the late eighties, early nineties -- was written by advocates who idealized prisoners, or by wannabe prosecutors who demonized them. Both camps presented ideology; neither portrayed reality, at least as I saw it; they were of no help in my efforts to help my clients quit crime. Making Good does present that reality. It does so very well. I would have found it helpful at the outset of my career in corrections, and believe it would still be valuable to clinicians now.

Making Good is based on interviews with approximately sixty men and women with histories of petty crime. Half had quit crime, half were still at it. The interview transcripts ring true. In them I recognize the men I saw in individual and group therapy. Building on these interviews, Dr. Maruna articulates achievable and relevant treatment objectives.

He starts with a basic observation. Most petty criminals "age out." They get jobs. They get married. They stop committing crimes. Although this phenomenon is well documented, it is not understood. We do not know why some men give up crime while others continue. Dr. Maruna considers the usual explanations for this aging out process -- "maturation," burnout, increased social and economic opportunity. He shows none of these factors explain why some men leave the life of crime while others do not.

Calling criminals who quit crime "desisters," and those who continue "persisters." he asks if comparing the two sets can lead to an explanation of why some criminals quit while others continue.

He then asks a further question. If it can be determined how desisters differ from persisters, can an understanding this "aging out" process can be applied to helping persisters quit crime? I had asked this question myself, and not come up with an answer. Dr. Maruna does offer an answer, which I believe is least partially accurate.

He finds no significant difference in the usual suspects: psychopathology, intelligence and educational levels, histories of poverty and age of onset of criminal activity. Desisters and persisters both offer reliable histories of physical abuse. Many were in foster care, where they suffered yet worse abuse. They report egregious sexual abuse in foster care. One respondent tells of being rented out by his foster home on weekends to a pedophile ring.

Persisters and desisters are more alike than different. Persisters are not wholeheartedly committed to crime. Desisters are not enthusiastic law abiding citizens. Desisters and persisters are both fundamentally antisocial. They also agree that being a small time crook is a miserable way to live. Persisters feel stuck in this misery. Desisters have opted out of that misery, more than they have opted into society

The only significant difference between the two sets is locus of control. Persisters see themselves as victims of circumstance, with no way out of the life of crime, while desisters see themselves as agents of their own destiny, capable of doing something other than crime.

This book has four fundamental assets:

First, Dr. Maruna is exquisitely attuned to criminals, both unreconstructed and reformed.
He captures the thought and speech of this population; their passive voice expressing the disconnect between themselves and their crimes, and the active voice when they share something they've done right. He tracks the petty criminal's resolution, when arrested, to quit crime, and his ensuing sense of futility as he slips back into his old ways once out of jail.

In the persisting criminal's own eyes, he is the true, helpless victim of his own crimes. He denigrates anyone who succeeds in managing every day adult responsibilities. If he desists, the skepticism of people who knew him before his reform discourages him, while the positive response of people who came into his life afterward surprises him.

Persisters and desisters tell very different life narratives. Asked about critical turning points in their lives, desisters talk of things they have done as adults. Persisters talk of things that happened to them as children. The portrait of men doing life on the installment plan, and those done paying that debt is worth the price of admission.

Second, his methodology encourages humility in therapy of criminality. He makes it clear that when we talk about crime and criminality, we are dealing with at best roughly defined, very unclear concepts. Further, in differentiating desisters and persisters, we are dealing not with black and white, but with shades of gray. Constantly returning to the interviews, he shows a reality that is complex and uncertain.

If we are not certain what we are treating, it makes sense to be conservative in therapy of criminality. I was often exhorted to confront prisoners about their crimes, to correct their thinking errors, to teach them life skills. These can be useful and effective interventions if appropriate, but I was reluctant to use them until I knew they fit my clients. For many years I limited myself to listening carefully, and making sure that I made it safe for clients to talk. I stuck to my guns, but Making Good would have left me feeling less on my own.

Third, Dr. Maruna models self awareness. He is willing to call himself out. He thought it would be easy to find criminals determined to continue crime, happy in their choice. He admits he was wrong. He found very few persisting criminals happy in their work. Most wished they could drop out of crime.

Having debunked the notion that these are "super predators," he also acknowledges that by labeling them "persisters," he perpetuates the notion that they are predators after all. Persistence implies determination and commitment to the criminal life. Dr. Maruna owns up to the linguistic trap of his own making.

Fourth, having established the difference between desisters and persisters, Dr. Maruna provides a solid basis for relevant and effective therapy of criminality. Most therapy of criminality assumes that criminals must be forced to admit they have hurt their victims. They must be forced to develop insight and accept the principle of right and wrong.

Dr. Maruna shows these ideas are wrong. Since desisters and persisters differ in the realm of self-efficacy, not in morality, confronting criminals is a waste of time. Dr. Maruna dismisses clinicians who believe that for criminals, "incriminating themselves is in their own best interests." Rather than trying to get criminals to become good, we need to focus on helping them feel effective.

The question then, is how to promote self-efficacy. It will not happen overnight. There will be no epiphany, no bolt from the blue. There will be no conversion on the road to Damascus. Instead, there needs to be a change in habits. Quitting crime is like quitting smoking; people do it all the time. Successful desistance, prevention of relapse, demands follow up. Desisters are not "cured." They enter recovery. They need a support system.

This formulation is consistent with my own experience. Only occasionally did my telling clients how to solve their problems do any good. They rarely left sessions with an insight for which I could take credit. In my best groups the group members came up with their own answers to questions raised by their peers. My job was to make it safe for them to discuss problems and come up with their own answers. I believe that my ideas for solutions were consistently better than theirs, but the ideas the group came up with were their own. They benefitted more from learning to solve problems on their own, without resorting to crime, than in learning how I would solve their problems.

If I not only facilitated the group, but also made it mine, the group failed. If I facilitated the group and relinquished control so that the members owned it, the group succeeded.

I have one caveat. This book is a snapshot. It shows the difference between persisters and desisters, but not how the difference came about. A longitudinal study might show this evolution and might also correct the book's one defect: it underestimates how hard it is to quit crime. Quitting crime takes persistence in therapy, in recovery, in education and cultivation of a sense of being the author of one's own destiny.

Still, this book remains unique in my experience in offering a vision of change which is effective because it passes no moral judgments. It builds upon solid evidence of the difference between criminals who quit and criminals who do not. Its findings, its approach and methodology make it worth reading for anyone thinking about the objectives of therapy in correctional settings.
Shistus
Very important book. It has helped me in my work as Prison Fellowship volunteer in Peruvian prisons.
Nikok
I work with children and adults who are incarcerated in America. Our model of punishing to change behavior has not been effective. This book sheds light on why.
Olwado
recommended for anyone working in the field of forensics rehab, a "what's strong" instead of "what's wrong" perspective on individuals in the process of desistance from crime
Macage
school text book
Yozshugore
Because of prison overcrowding here in California, many have been released early from prison and sent to outpatient clinics. Hence, many of them have come to see me. This book helped me a lot while working with those who have been in and out of prison for years.

Shadd Maruna actually studied the narratives of those who have desisted from crime with those who haven't and found significant differences in the way they think. To determine how likely it was for a client to return back to prison, I would compare their narratives with those in the book.

While recidivism rates continue to be high, this book does give one hope as everyone does eventually desist from crime.
Marige
Winner of a 2001 American Society of Criminology Award for Most Outstanding Contribution To Criminology, this meticulously researched book describes the process through which hard-core criminal recidivists desist from crime to lead productive lives.

As the pendulum begins to turn from a crazed rush to incarcerate, there is more and more interest in the topic of prisoner re-entry. What can help criminals turn their lives around and become productive citizens? This book is a great starting point for answering this complex question.
One of my goals in life is to help inmates make there lives positives ones. This is my first book I've read on criminal reform and I am absolutely in love with it (and very lucky to find it). It has also been a learning experience for my life (a desisting one). `Shadd Maruna has written a classic in my library. Looking forward to any follow-ups!
If you read this Dr. Maruna, thank you for your book. It will help me when I get out of college.
Along with this I currently just picked up "Inside Rikers" by Jen Wynn (sp?). For all others interested in other titles.

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