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Download Islam without Extremes: A Muslim Case for Liberty fb2, epub

by Mustafa Akyol

Download Islam without Extremes: A Muslim Case for Liberty fb2, epub

ISBN: 0393347249
Author: Mustafa Akyol
Language: English
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company; 1 edition (November 4, 2013)
Pages: 368
Category: Humanities
Subcategory: Other
Rating: 4.5
Votes: 592
Size Fb2: 1967 kb
Size ePub: 1349 kb
Size Djvu: 1815 kb
Other formats: doc mbr azw lrf


Islam without Extremes book. Start by marking Islam without Extremes: A Muslim Case for Liberty as Want to Read

Islam without Extremes book. Start by marking Islam without Extremes: A Muslim Case for Liberty as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Mustafa Akyol is a Turk and a believing Muslim. Akyol concludes that militant Islam is essentially a political tool rather than a genuinely spiritual movement

Mustafa Akyol is a Turk and a believing Muslim. The theme of his book is that all the oppression of Muslim regimes are based not on the Qur'an, but on cruel customs that exist in some Muslim societies, which are quite independent of the Qur'an, but have then been attributed to Islam. Akyol concludes that militant Islam is essentially a political tool rather than a genuinely spiritual movement. But there is still hope for a liberal Islam, and Akyol sees it emerging in post-Ottoman Turkey, whose history he gives us.

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Persuasive and inspiring, Islam Without Extremes offers a desperately needed intellectual basis for the reconcilability of. .People Who Liked Islam Without Extremes: A Muslim Case for Liberty Also Liked These Free Titles: Inside Islam: What a Billion Muslims Really Think.

Persuasive and inspiring, Islam Without Extremes offers a desperately needed intellectual basis for the reconcilability of Islam and religious, political, economic, and social freedoms.

Norton & Company, 2011), ISBN: 978-0-393-07086-6, 352 pp. Tengku Ahmad Hazri, IAIS Malaysia Freedom is frequently a topic of controversy in discussions of Islam and the West what everyone needs to ind God.

Books related to Islam without Extremes: A Muslim Case for Liberty. The book amazingly dig deep into Islam to distinguish between what is Islam and what we think is Islam. Beyond Fundamentalism. I strongly recommend this book. by Ahmed on May 3, 2013. Islam without Extremes: A Muslim Case for Liberty.

In Islam without Extremes, Turkish columnist Mustafa Akyol answers this question by revealing the little-understood roots of political Islam, which originally included . 1 x Islam Without Extremes A Muslim ase for Liberty.

In Islam without Extremes, Turkish columnist Mustafa Akyol answers this question by revealing the little-understood roots of political Islam, which originally included both rationalist, flexible strains and more dogmatic, rigid ones. Though the rigid traditionalists won out, Akyol points to a flourishing of liberalism in the nineteenth-century Ottoman Empire and the unique "Islamo-liberal synthesis" in present-day Turkey. As he powerfully asserts, only by accepting a secular state can Islamic societies thrive.

The Failure of the "Turkish Model". The publication of this book, three years ago, was received in the West with some enthusiasm. The volume seemed to promise that the dream of numerous observers of the Muslim world-that a "moderate" Islamist ideology could emerge and that it would be paired with an opening to free-market economics-would be realized after many decades, if not centuries.

“A delightfully original take on…the prospects for liberal democracy in the broader Islamic Middle East.”―Matthew Kaminski, Wall Street Journal

As the Arab Spring threatens to give way to authoritarianism in Egypt and reports from Afghanistan detail widespread violence against U.S. troops and women, news from the Muslim world raises the question: Is Islam incompatible with freedom? In Islam without Extremes, Turkish columnist Mustafa Akyol answers this question by revealing the little-understood roots of political Islam, which originally included both rationalist, flexible strains and more dogmatic, rigid ones. Though the rigid traditionalists won out, Akyol points to a flourishing of liberalism in the nineteenth-century Ottoman Empire and the unique “Islamo-liberal synthesis” in present-day Turkey. As he powerfully asserts, only by accepting a secular state can Islamic societies thrive. Islam without Extremes offers a desperately needed intellectual basis for the reconcilability of Islam and liberty.

Comments:

Beazerdred
Among the central questions of our time is whether or not democracy -- or, in the larger sense, free societies -- are possible for non-Western cultures. Here in America, many ask if our understanding of "liberty" will translate to other, non-western cultures that do not share our Judeo-Christian legacy.

This question is all the more important now, as we observe the fallout from the Arab Spring of 2011. It is not rare to hear someone ask if there is something inherently authoritarian in Islam. Is democracy even worth trying? Should we be concerned, for example, that an Islamist regime will be elected in Egypt, replacing one kind of authoritarianism with another?

This excellent book by Mustafa Akyol, apparently written before the Arab Spring, speaks to these questions. It is an useful aide to those of us trying to understand these exciting and challenging times.

Akyol first traces the history of Islam, a survey which alone is incredibly helpful to this American reader.

Next Akyol points to a problem that should not surprise western Christians or western readers at large: the confusion of tradition/culture with scripture. By separating these two things, he argues, we can see seeds of liberalism within the scripture. Sharia -- which many fear and some for good reason -- is not scripture, and, Akyol reminds us, is written by men. Therefore it can be amended by men.

With such bold statements, one wonders if Akyol is nailing theses to doors. Only he is, apparently, not the first to do so. Others have come before him and, he says, it is worth taking a look at their work... as well as at the historical events that crushed it.

Finally looking to his home country, Akyol reports exciting news from Turkey. Thriving new economies, new (and old) means of public and private expression, discussions of freedom of religion. All these Turkish experiences, and others, give us means for optimism for the people of the so-called Middle East.

Key to it, Akyol argues, is not to throw away a "backward" religion but instead to embrace it. In fact, Akyol argues, stripping away the religion in Turkey -- just as others have imposed it elsewhere -- has been tried and resulted in disaster. Instead, a marriage of a secular (not "secularist") state and a free people is the recipe for not just the success of the state, the economy, and the nation but also for the faithful and free hearts of the people.

I have recommended this book, already, to many. The subject matter is interesting, as I have said, but in addition, Akyol somehow makes this rather intimidating topic into an enjoyable read. This makes Islam Without Extremes: A Muslim Case for Liberty a unique and important work.
Marr
The author does a fair job in contemplating, even if in a somewhat revisionist manner, a more modern, moderate path of Islamic belief. His interest in reducing or eliminating the extremes in both religious and secular life is well stated and his personal history certainly attests to his interests in promoting non-violence and peace. His thoughts on the history of Islam and the difference between the "recitation" and accumulated cultural behaviors neither discussed nor endorsed by it are helpful and perhaps relevant to all religious believers.

His concerns about liberty, however, poorly confront, as most received religion commentators, the central ideas of liberty. Believing that humans were created by a deity and this deity has provided them with reasons to worship, admire, and submit chip at liberty's foundations. Even the mildest forms of any Abrahamic religion begin with the premise that humans owe a debt or devotion to a creator that cannot be repaid except through a loss of liberty.

In this particular case the author's plea for religious liberty boils down to a simple plea for a simpler, kinder version of Islam. Liberty, in its essence, is the ability to use inquiry, seek proof, and strive for humanity's betterment. Not simply to make a choice to not observe a particular religion without fear of reprisal.

An interesting read, but persuasively weak.
Perongafa
One should always be mindful, if not suspect, of authors who begin their works describing their own ethnic no less religious background as a prelim for the inspectional research they are about to offer the reader. Reza Asian in his recent non-fiction Zealot: The Life and Times of Jesus Christ fails into the same trap with such personal recounts serving as a first strike offensive maneuver, liken to an opening statement in a trial, just in case they are attacked and wish to defend against any prejudicial criticism of the presentation that follows. Wish that writers professing to take an accounting of history would follow the example of Pulitzer Pricing winning author Jared Diamond and state at the outset what they wish to prove as opposed to trying to show their unbiased appraisal of the facts they unveil. This tripping point is what prevents the book from receiving a five star rating.
Putting aside this observation the insights as the contextual birth and developmental evolution of Islam against the backdrop of the societal environment that begot and molded the third leg of western theology based on the chief tenant of Abrahamic introduction, one supreme deity, is a worthwhile read. While the genesis of the Moslem faith is revisited along with the divide of Sunnis and Shiites the true value of the book is an examination of the two key principles that affect if not control the lives of the faithful – the Koran, written verses of the Prophet Mohammed and Shariah law, as derived from Islamic Hadith, supposedly oral ‘overheard’ sayings attributed to him of which thousands have circulated. Interesting that Judaism contains an identical parallel with the Torah and Mishnah or Gemara providing duel guidance for its followers. Both of these mutual references seem to cause the most problems in applying the two religions with faithful observance due at times troubled by the conflicting aspects between both as well as the interpretations offered of the two duel prime texts, the Koran and Torah by the respective Hadith and Mishnah . The author presents at great length how the Hadith impacted Islam observance across different social-political environments – and here he is at his best.
The second area where the author provides insightful references is in his discussion of the Ottoman Empire as it wrestled with the flow of modernization seeping across its western borders while trying to maintain its traditional Moslems roots. The old adage that to go forward one must understand and appreciate the past helps to give the reader a valued background for the events that continue to reshape the Islamic world today.
While the book has been criticized by the Islamic orthodoxy as to its historic religious references and political observers regarding the portrayal of how best to settle issues in the future; it might be best for its readers to draw their own conclusions as at least it offers another step on the ladder of knowledge in the complicated world of religious history as influenced by the social, political and economic environments that helped birth it and gave nourishment to its development.

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