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by Elizabeth Edwards Spalding

Download The First Cold Warrior: Harry Truman, Containment, and the Remaking of Liberal Internationalism fb2, epub

ISBN: 0813123925
Author: Elizabeth Edwards Spalding
Language: English
Publisher: University Press of Kentucky; First Edition (1st printing), edition (May 26, 2006)
Pages: 336
Category: Humanities
Subcategory: Other
Rating: 4.8
Votes: 484
Size Fb2: 1313 kb
Size ePub: 1520 kb
Size Djvu: 1900 kb
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The First Cold Warrior: Harry Truman, Containment, and the Remaking of Liberal Internationalism.

The First Cold Warrior: Harry Truman, Containment, and the Remaking of Liberal Internationalism. The University Press of Kentucky. p. 64. ^ McGhee, George (1990). Acheson and the Formulation of the Truman Doctrine" Journal of Modern Greek Studies 1999 17(2): 229–251. Kennan, 'Universalism,' and the Truman Doctrine," Journal of Cold War Studies, Spring 2009, Vol. 11 Issue 2, pp 3–34. Reconsiderations: Was the Truman Doctrine a Real Turning Point?"

Spalding's new book indicates what may become a new strain in the study of American foreign policy. "This Harry Truman biography is more academic than most books about his colorful personality and presidency.

Spalding's new book indicates what may become a new strain in the study of American foreign policy. ―Register of the Kentucky Historical Society. An important reevaluation of Truman. ―Ron Radosh, TNR blog. Spalding's final chapter is a substantive treatment of Truman's underestimated faith, particularly in relation to his Cold War anti-Communism. "―Paul Kengor, Christianity Today.

Elizabeth Edwards Spalding. From the first days of his unexpected presidency in April 1945 through the landmark NSC 68 of 1950, Harry Truman was central to the formation of America's grand strategy during the Cold War and the subsequent remaking of . Others are frequently associated with the terminology of and responses to the perceived global Communist threat after the Second World War: Walter Lippmann popularized the term "cold war," and George F. Kennan first used the word "containment" in a strategic sense.

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Home Browse Books Book details, The First Cold Warrior: Harry Truman,. The First Cold Warrior: Harry Truman, Containment, and the Remaking of Liberal Internationalism. By Elizabeth Edwards Spalding. Though certainly influenced by the idealistic internationalism of Woodrow Wilson and the pragmatic internationalism of Franklin Roosevelt, Truman's conception of liberal internationalism differed from that of his predecessors

Elizabeth Edwards Spalding. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 2006. Though certainly influenced by the idealistic internationalism of Woodrow Wilson and the pragmatic internationalism of Franklin Roosevelt, Truman's conception of liberal internationalism differed from that of his predecessors. Publication of this volume was made possible in part by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN-13: 978-0-8131-2392-9 (hardcover : alk. paper) ISBN-10: 0-8131-2392-5 (hardcover : alk. paper) 1. Truman, Harry . 1884–1972. 2. United States-Foreign relations-1945–1953.

From the first days of his unexpected presidency in April 1945 through the landmark NSC 68 of 1950, Harry Truman was central to the formation of America's grand strategy during the Cold War and the subsequent remaking of .

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for The First Cold Warrior: Harry Truman, Containment . From the moment he took the oath of office in April 1945, Harry Truman was required to make difficult decisions in an increasingly dangerous world

From the moment he took the oath of office in April 1945, Harry Truman was required to make difficult decisions in an increasingly dangerous world. University Press of Kentucky.

From the first days of his unexpected presidency in April 1945 through the landmark NSC 68 of 1950, Harry Truman was central to the formation of America's grand strategy during the Cold War and the subsequent remaking of U.S. foreign policy. Others are frequently associated with the terminology of and responses to the perceived global Communist threat after the Second World War: Walter Lippmann popularized the term "cold war," and George F. Kennan first used the word "containment" in a strategic sense. Although Kennan, Secretary of State Dean Acheson, and Secretary of Defense George C. Marshall have been seen as the most influential architects of American Cold War foreign policy, The First Cold Warrior draws on archives and other primary sources to demonstrate that Harry Truman was the key decision maker in the critical period between 1945 and 1950. In a significant reassessment of the thirty-third president and his political beliefs, Elizabeth Edwards Spalding contends that it was Truman himself who defined and articulated the theoretical underpinnings of containment. His practical leadership style was characterized by policies and institutions such as the Truman Doctrine, the Marshall Plan, NATO, the Berlin airlift, the Department of Defense, and the National Security Council. Part of Truman's unique approach―shaped by his religious faith and dedication to anti-communism―was to emphasize the importance of free peoples, democratic institutions, and sovereign nations. With these values, he fashioned a new liberal internationalism, distinct from both Woodrow Wilson's progressive internationalism and Franklin D. Roosevelt's liberal pragmatism, which still shapes our politics. Truman deserves greater credit for understanding the challenges of his time and for being America's first cold warrior. This reconsideration of Truman's overlooked statesmanship provides a model for interpreting the international crises facing the United States in this new era of ideological conflict.

Comments:

Ynye
Prof. Spalding's little study of Harry Truman's coming to grips with the developing Cold War must enthrall some historians and Truman fans. While other writers are enlarging Truman's role in formulating the geographic containment of the Soviet Union, Spalding elevates Truman to mythical statuses of thought and action on a par with Lincoln's. At times she reduces Winston Churchill to but a glib flack for Trumanesque wisdom: "he invited Winston Churchill to give the Fulton (College) address (on the Iron Curtain) of March, 1946, relying on him to articulate and underscore the stakes of the Cold War to the American public as only Churchill could". George Kennan's spring, 1946 "Long Telegram" from Moscow was, Ms. Spalding opines, overshadowed by a 100,000 word tome written by an obscure White House aide in the name of close Truman confidant Clark Clifford. She admits that the Clifford report is "often overlooked or dismissed as overzealous anticommunism", yet credits it as "the theoretical basis of containment". Truman biographer David McCullough does credit Clifford and aide George Elsey for work on the President's announcement of the Truman Doctrine. Finally, Ms. Spalding trods the halls of Marxism, asserting the Trumanesque belief that Yugoslavia's Marshal Tito would have attempted to unseat Stalin as leader of the Communist Bloc if only Yugoslavia's army had been a tad stronger. A pretty thought, but if she is correct, Truman's view of 1948 Balkan events exaggerated the point of resurging Yugoslav nationalistic Marxism. She also fails to deal with US covert operations aimed at causing mischief in Soviet satellites.
A strong spin on still evolving respect for Truman, but one that left this writer not toally convinced.
Larosa
Elizabeth Edwards Spalding's book, The First Cold Warrior: Harry Truman, Containment, and the Remaking of Liberal Internationalism examines the role of Harry Truman and his administration in setting the stage for the Cold War. The author notes the differences between Truman's approach to foreign policy and those of his predecessors, Woodrow Wilson and Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Spalding places Truman front and center in formulating policies that dealt with the Soviet Union in a confrontational manner.

Spalding's basic argument is that for too long Harry Truman has not been given his due because he had been eclipsed by other foreign policy luminaries of the era, notably George F. Kennan. Where Kennan's approach to foreign policy was based upon a pragmatic assessment of Soviet and American power, as well as a traditional balance of power politics, Truman was very much the ideologue who viewed the burgeoning Cold War in terms of good and evil. Truman led the way in the early Cold War initiatives largely because of this world view. And while Kennan, George Marshall, and others had a hand in crafting the Marshall Plan, the founding of NATO, the Truman Doctrine, the Berlin Airlift, and even the Korean War, it was Truman who proved the primary force behind these policies.

Truman's opposition to Communism was founded in a belief that it was a tyrannical form of government that squashed freedom. According to Spalding, Truman was moved far more by Churchill's dramatic declarations against the Soviet Union that he was by Kennan's reasoned assessments. “In the summer of 1946, he fully accepted the reality of the treat and conflict as articulated by Churchill rather than Kennan (47-48).” It was Truman and not Kennan, Spalding argues, who was the true author of Containment.

Spalding also draws important distinctions between Truman's world view and that of FDR and Wilson. Though Truman held each of his predecessors in very high regard, he differed sharply with them when it came to his vision of international liberalism. Truman did not believe that international institutions and goodwill alone would preserve the peace, as had FDR and Wilson. Rather, “The president stressed that only strength would deter future aggressors form threatening peace or liberty... (18).” For Truman, as for his predecessors, American leadership in the post-war world was essential. However, Truman understood that the triumphant Allies of World War II could not solve all of the world's problems in the way that Wilson and FDR imagined they could. Rather, strength, and a willingness to confront the Soviet Union rather than placate it was paramount to the free world's security.

Kelly Crager, writing for Humanities and Social Sciences Net Online, called the world “deftly written,” but believed the author stumbled in “often heavy-handed defense of Truman” and in Spalding's attempts to draw parallels with the George W. Bush administration.

Spalding makes a strong and convincing case for Truman's centrality in creating America's political weapons of the Cold War. She also succeeds in painting Truman as the ideological cold warrior that he was. Just as Wilson and FDR were motivated by their ideological convictions for creating institutions to preserve peace after the war, here Truman is given his due as a figure who understood the world as it is, one in which evil must be confronted rather than appeased in the hopes of positive result. Perhaps Spalding does give Truman too much credit in creating the policy of containment. Certainly Kennan is an essential figure when considering the intellectual framework of the policy. But Spalding is correct in her portrayal of Truman as the essential implementer and leader of the policy, the man who understood the evil of the Soviet Union and was willing to confront it.
Weernis
Democrats struggling to develop a foreign policy vision in the post-9/11 world would do well to study Harry Truman's tough response to Soviet aggression following the Second World War. This book, based on years of primary research, is an excellent introduction to the subject.

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