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by Dexter Hoyos

Download The Carthaginians (Peoples of the Ancient World) fb2, epub

ISBN: 0415436443
Author: Dexter Hoyos
Language: English
Publisher: Routledge (July 9, 2010)
Pages: 288
Category: Humanities
Subcategory: Other
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 877
Size Fb2: 1738 kb
Size ePub: 1891 kb
Size Djvu: 1777 kb
Other formats: lit azw mobi mbr


In addition, Dexter Hoyos’ The Carthaginians has the merit of being one of the few books in an already impoverished body of literature which deals with this fascinating culture without continual reference to their nemesis Rome.

In addition, Dexter Hoyos’ The Carthaginians has the merit of being one of the few books in an already impoverished body of literature which deals with this fascinating culture without continual reference to their nemesis Rome. Here they stand proud and loud as a successful and influential civilization in their own right, not just one of Rome’s early enemies. Mark is a history writer based in Italy. He holds an MA in Political Philosophy and is the Publishing Director at AHE. Related Content.

The Carthaginians reveals the complex culture, society and achievements of a famous . The Carthaginians Peoples of the Ancient World.

The Carthaginians reveals the complex culture, society and achievements of a famous, yet misunderstood, ancient people. Beginning as Phoenician settlers in North Africa, the Carthaginians then broadened their civilization with influences from neighbouring North African peoples, Egypt, and the Greek world.

Dexter Hoyos writes on Latin teaching and ancient history. Incredible book! The author does an excellent job discussing more of the cultural and historical events surrounding the Carthaginian empire. He even gets into the running of Government and colonial possessions. Everything is laid out clearly and I have learned so much more about Carthage reading this than reading books about just the Punic wars.

The Carthaginians book. The Carthaginians reveals the complex culture, society and achievements of a famous, yet misunderstood, ancient people. Their own cultural influence in turn spread across the Western The Carthaginians reveals the complex culture, society and achievements of a famous, yet misunderstood, ancient people.

series Peoples of the Ancient World.

Ancient sources concur that Carthage had become perhaps the wealthiest city in the world via its trade and commerce, yet few .

Ancient sources concur that Carthage had become perhaps the wealthiest city in the world via its trade and commerce, yet few remains of its riches exist. This is due to the fact that most of it was short-lived materials-textiles, unworked metal, foodstuffs, and slaves; its trade in fabricated goods was only a part of its wares.

item 2 The Carthaginians (Peoples of the Ancient World) New Paperback Book -The Carthaginians (Peoples of the Ancient . Place of Publication. Peoples of the Ancient World.

item 2 The Carthaginians (Peoples of the Ancient World) New Paperback Book -The Carthaginians (Peoples of the Ancient World) New Paperback Book. Free postage -The Carthaginians (Peoples of the Ancient World) (Paperback), Ho. .

The Carthaginians reveals the complex culture, society and achievements of a famous, yet misunderstood, ancient people. Beginning as Phoenician settlers in North Africa, the Carthaginians then broadened their civilization with influences from neighbouring North African peoples, Egypt, and the Greek world. Their own cultural influence in turn spread across the Western Mediterranean as they imposed dominance over Sardinia, western Sicily, and finally southern Spain.

As a stable republic Carthage earned respectful praise from Greek observers, notably Aristotle, and from many Romans – even Cato, otherwise notorious for insisting that ‘Carthage must be destroyed’. Carthage matched the great city-state of Syracuse in power and ambition, then clashed with Rome for mastery of the Mediterranean West. For a time, led by her greatest general Hannibal, she did become the leading power between the Atlantic and the Adriatic.

It was chiefly after her destruction in 146 BC that Carthage came to be depicted by Greeks and Romans as an alien civilization, harsh, gloomy and bloodstained. Demonising the victim eased the embarrassment of Rome’s aggression; Virgil in his Aeneid was one of the few to offer a more sensitive vision. Exploring both written and archaeological evidence, The Carthaginians reveals a complex, multicultural and innovative people whose achievements left an indelible impact on their Roman conquerors and on history.

Comments:

Amis
The Carthaginians is the most thoroughly researched and comprehensive book I have read about the Carthaginian civilization and its history. Dexter Hoyos draws upon both archeology and ancient writings to produce as complete a portrait of ancient Carthage and it's sphere of influence as possible, and in so doing he dispels or brings into question a number of the myths and misconception that modern students of history have about Carthage.
For example, there is a belief, based on recent archeology that the Carthaginians built up their circular inner harbor well after the Second Punic War in preparation for renewed hostilities with Rome. Hoyos believes that the inner harbor was actually constructed during the Second Punic War “As noted earlier, archeological work on Carthage's circular port has turned up very few items datable before the mid 2nd century; but rather than showing that she was now rebuilding a navy and so breaking peace terms, this suggests that the port had substantial work done on it then. The likeliest reason for the overhaul would be that merchant shipping had outgrown the capacity of the outer commercial port. The reported claim by Roman envoys to Carthage in 153, that they had seen quantities of wood stored for building a war fleet may misrepresent this project; similarly Masinissa's son Gulussa's allegation to the Roman Senate in 151 that the Carthaginians were evilly scheming a fleet-a claim he had already wrongly made over twenty years earlier. The senate, it is worth noting, treated all these assertions with remarkable sang-froid, probably aware that there were no such plans.”
Hoyos gives a thorough account of Carthaginian religion, gods both native and borrowed. On the question of whether or not the Carthaginians practiced child sacrifice, he declines to give a firm yes or no answer. He presents evidence, but seems to think that it is contradictory and inconclusive. Perhaps if your standard of evidence is “beyond a reasonable doubt,” you cannot say for certain that the Carthaginians followed this practice, but if your standard is “The preponderance of evidence,” one may conclude that, in all likelihood, they did.
As for the common myth that the Romans salted the ruins of Carthage and environs, Hoyos says: “Rome's new despots Caesar and then Augustus ignored Scipio's (Scipio Minor) curse to found a city which, like the rest of North Africa, would flourish far into the future. (They did not, incidentally, need to scrape away any salt: it was not Scipio in 146 BC but a historian in 1928 who scattered that all over the ruins.)
The Carthaginians is a valuable source for anyone interested in learning more about the substantial role that Carthage played in western history.
Valawye
Very good information!
Malakelv
Another excellent search into Mediterranean History.
melody of you
Excellent source, perhaps the best book on the suject
INwhite
This book provides a clear explanation of Carthaginian history, including much archaeological and narrative evidence for the author's points. I used this piece, at the recommendation of a professor, in writing a research paper for a college course and it served me well. Dexter Hoyos is a gifted author writing about an interesting subject. This is an excellent work for academic purposes, and it is quite good for leisure as well.
Mori
I hope Dexter reads these reviews, for I would like to sincerely thank him for writing this outstanding book.

Having a deep interest in the subject matter, I have read the Polybius and the Livy, Daily Life in Carthage by Charles-Picard, Carthage Must Be Destroyed by Richard Miles, The Punic Wars by Adrian Goldsworthy, and various books on the major actors of the era. This book I would select above them all for any person who wants to know what can be known about Carthage. Modest in size, Dexter's brilliant outline and economical yet powerful prose give the reader an intense amount of valuable information, and that with style and self-effacing grace.

I have read this work last of all of the books listed above, and the fact that I feel now that I have learned much more than what I knew before may be helpful to those seeking to maximize their time by selecting only a single book. They are all wonderful books. Perhaps The Carthaginians may be a more up to date volume to replace Daily Life in Carthage.

The hardcover edition itself is excellent. Very high quality in every detail. I thank the publishers as well for giving a great book a great edition.

I am no historian, just a fan of them and of history, and if you are as well then this book will be a friend to you and to scholars alike. I enthusiastically give it the highest rating.
Adaly
This is not only the best book (in my opinion) available on Carthage, it is my favorite book on my entire bookshelf. Other reviewers went into great detail about the book so I will just say the following. It provides the most comprehensive description of Carthaginian government, religion, trade, society, etc. that can be found. I have read other books on the subject including one of my past favorites (Carthage Must be Destroyed) and this book puts it to shame. It is well researched, well written, and concise (only about 225 pages). I recommend this book to anyone that wants to learn more about the amazing civilization of Carthage. If I could give it more stars I would. It is worth every cent of the seemingly high price attached to it. Dexter is to be commended.
This book is short but very sweet. It is so nice to find material about Carthage that goes beyond the scope of Hannibal and the Punic Wars. This is a must-have for any serious (or casual) student of Carthage. Unfortunately, the price is completely outrageous. The book is great but not worth being ripped-off for. (Of course, that is the fault of the publisher and not the author.)

Recommended.

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