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by Plato,Robin Waterfield

Download Phaedrus (Oxford World's Classics) fb2, epub

ISBN: 0192802771
Author: Plato,Robin Waterfield
Language: English
Publisher: Oxford University Press (January 16, 2003)
Pages: 176
Category: Humanities
Subcategory: Other
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 867
Size Fb2: 1403 kb
Size ePub: 1926 kb
Size Djvu: 1259 kb
Other formats: docx mobi doc mbr


Plato, Robin Waterfield. I have heard some call this work a confused jumble of unrelated concepts.

Plato, Robin Waterfield. The first part of the dialogue deals with three speeches on the topic of love. This is used only as an example and is not the primary theme (though it is an extremely thorough and compelling examination of the subject.

Only 9 left in stock (more on the way). Only 16 left in stock (more on the way). Robin Waterfield's translations include Plato's Republic, Symposium, Gorgias, Aristotle's Physics, Herodotus' Histories, Plutarch's Greek Lives and Roman Lives, Euripides, Orestes and Other Plays and The First Philosophers: the Presocratics and the Sophists. He is also the author of a biography of Kahlil Gibran. Series: Oxford World's Classics.

Republic (Oxford World's Classics).

Plato: Phaedrus (translation, introduction, notes), Oxford University Press (Oxford World's Classics), 2002

Plato: Phaedrus (translation, introduction, notes), Oxford University Press (Oxford World's Classics), 2002. Plato: Timaeus and Critias (translation; introduction and notes by A. Gregory), Oxford University Press (Oxford World's Classics), 2008.

Why Read Plato's "Republic"? Robin Waterfield - Продолжительность: 2:18 Oxford Academic (Oxford University . The Symposium by Plato - FULL Audio Book - Ancient Greek Philosophy.

The Symposium by Plato - FULL Audio Book - Ancient Greek Philosophy. Some of our greatest blessings come from madness Phaedrus is widely recognized as one of Plato's most profound and beautiful works. It takes the form of a dialogue between Socrates and Phaedrus and its ostensible subject is love, especially homoerotic love. Socrates reveals it to be a kind of divine madness that can allow our souls to grow wings and soar to their greatest heights. Then the conversation changes direction and turns to a discussion of rhetoric, which must be based on truth passionately sought, thus allying it to philosophy.

Publisher: Oxford University Press; Oxford World's Classics. Published in print: 2002. Published online: January 2019.

The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists (Oxford World's Classics). Plutarch; Philip A. Stadter, Robin Waterfield (trans. The Masnavi, Book One (Oxford World's Classics). Phaedrus (Oxford World's Classics). Категория: Образование. 7 Mb. The Complete Fairy Tales (Oxford World's Classics Hardbacks).

Plato Translated by Robin Waterfield. Oxford World's Classics. Some of our greatest blessings come from madness. Phaedrus is widely recognized as one of Plato's most profound and beautiful works

Plato Translated by Robin Waterfield. Phaedrus is widely recognized as one of Plato's most profound and beautiful works.

Oxford University Press. Серия: Oxford World's Classics. The fables of Aesop have become one of the most enduring traditions of European culture, ever since they were first written down nearly two millennia ago. Aesop was reputedly a tongue-tied slave who miraculously received the power of speech; from his legendary storytelling came the collections of prose and verse fables scattered throughout Greek and Roman literature.

Phaedrus is widely recognized as one of Plato's most profound and beautiful works. It takes the form of a dialogue between Socrates and Phaedrus and its ostensible subject is love, especially homoerotic love. Socrates reveals it to be a kind of divine madness that can allow our souls to grow wings and soar to their greatest heights. Then the conversation changes direction and turns to a discussion of rhetoric, which must be based on truth passionately sought, thus allying it to philosophy. The dialogue closes by denigrating the value of the written word in any context, compared to the living teaching of a Socratic philosopher. The shifts of topic and register have given rise to doubts about the unity of the dialogue, doubts which are addressed in the introduction to this volume. Full explanatory notes also elucidate issues throughout the dialogue that might puzzle a modern reader.

Comments:

Shou
This great work of Plato is a recording of a philosophical discussion and debate of Socrates and his contemporary philosopher friends at a banquet held by Agathon at his residence over the subject called DOCTRINE OF LOVE.

One would get mesmerized by the different opinions about love by some of the greatest Greek minds.The discussion and debate proceeds one after the other with each of the great persons like Agathon, Aristodemus, Eryximachus, Pausanias, Aristophanes and finally Socrates describe love in all possible permutations and combinations. Each of them have their own versions which might appear true to every reader in some context or the other. But the one given by Socrates was of course the best! His version of love is that of immortality through beauty. According to him every living thing loves to be immortal and eternal and hence it re-creates itself through an emotion called love. Hence according to Socrates, love is nothing but one’s affinity for eternity or immortality of body and fame, which is attained through this complex psychological emotion.
At one point in the book, the reader gets an impression about the speakers favoring homosexuality as some of them argue about the purity of love more in the same sex rather than opposite sexes. One gets a feeling that even Socrates favored this in his opinion. But we are not sure of how it got contemplated later.
One can get the best of philosophical definitions and derivations about love in this book right through some of the greatest minds of Greek philosophy.

My favorite quote in the book
“Evil is the vulgar lover who loves the body rather than the soul, in as much as he is not even stable, because he loves a thing which is in itself unstable, and therefore when the bloom of youth which he was desiring is over, he takes wing and flies away, in spite of all his words and promises; whereas the love of the noble disposition is life-long, for it becomes one with the everlasting”

My rating is 3.75 out of 5
Elizabeth
While I felt I should find great inspiration in this classic work, I found it rather tedious. The introduction was just a “pre-hash” of the book to come, so as I slogged my way through it, I felt like I was reading it twice. For the most part both the introduction and the translation utilized somewhat archaic language, making sentence structure very difficult to follow.

The part I enjoyed was the description of the three genders: male, female, and androgynous. It is my understanding that it is from this explanation of the origin of humans that the belief in soul mates comes. However, most descriptions of soul mates do not mention that the concept is only for the split souls, not for the average male and female who were never merged in the first place. If the translation is accurate, then many present-day beliefs about soul and Plato’s concept of soul mates are at variance with Plato (or Plato’s Aristophanes). By this I mean, after my reading Symposium, I have come to see that the ideas about love that I was taught were Plato’s, were more interpretations of what Plato’s ideas about love were. Like any philosophy, his ideas are subject to interpretation and commentary, losing the purity of the original thought and infusing it with the personal perspective of each interpreter.

I recently read a YA book entitled Dead Beautiful by Yvonne Woon (Hyperion, 2010, New York) which quotes the Symposium in the Prologue. Upon reading the quotation, I immediately acquired Symposium to read the context of the quote for myself. Ms. Woon’s application of “soul mates” is, I believe, much closer to the mark than the average, romantic version of them.
AGAD
Ignore the title and please do not judge me poorly because of it. I found the “Symposium” insightful and titillating (i.e. not in a sexual connotation). I have always had a difficult time trying to convey what “love” meant. So I denoted the term as a “feeling”, instead realizing that “love” could not be compacted into a simplistic meaning. I had unintentionally devalued its worth. I can’t ensure that I completely understand what love is, but I can safely say that this book has helped clarify a couple of my misconceptions. I am happy to say that I have gained a lot of insightful knowledge from this book.

P.S. The dialogue with the drunken character and Socrates was hilarious.
Thetahuginn
It is a classic oldie. I got it because Persig identified his alter ego as Phaedrus. And I was curious. I still do not know why the Zen motorcyclist identified with Phaedrus. I do know that Socrates talks about love here and he specifically addresses the question of how one should treat a young boy that one loves. Things were different then, huh. Or were they? Take out the man-boy relationship used as an example, and there's a lot there about the right way to love someone. Still, I understand why it is not on the Great Books reading list.
Runeterror
Exactly what was pictured. Was scheduled to arrive on Monday, but got here Friday afternoon. A must-buy for any philosophical bookworm.

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