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Download The Fastest Clock in the Universe (Methuen Drama Modern Plays) fb2, epub

by Philip Ridley

Download The Fastest Clock in the Universe (Methuen Drama Modern Plays) fb2, epub

ISBN: 1408126710
Author: Philip Ridley
Language: English
Publisher: Methuen Drama (September 17, 2009)
Pages: 112
Category: Humanities
Subcategory: Other
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 841
Size Fb2: 1627 kb
Size ePub: 1458 kb
Size Djvu: 1597 kb
Other formats: lrf docx docx doc


Publisher: Methuen Drama (September 17, 2009). I feel like I would be able to say that The Fastest Clock in the Universe was well written were it not for the fact that every other sentence is the contains one if not two or three f-words.

Publisher: Methuen Drama (September 17, 2009). Take that lovely little expletive out and the play would probably lose a third of its volume. However, the word was used beyond what was needed and just left a bad taste in my mouth.

The Fastest Clock in the Universe is a two act play by Philip Ridley. It was Ridley's second stage play and premiered at the Hampstead Theatre, London on 14 May 1992 and featured Jude Law in one of his early major stage roles in the part of Foxtrot Darling. The production was the second collaboration between Ridley and director Matthew Lloyd, who would go on to direct the original productions for the majority of Ridley's plays until 2000.

Philip Ridley's edgy and provocative drama caused a sensation when it premiered at Hampstead Theatre in 1992, winning the Evening Standard Award for Most Promising Newcomer to the Stage and the Meyer Whitworth Prize. It is now regarded as a contemporary classic. A bit like a ride on a ghost train. you find yourself shuddering with shock and laughing uproariously. horror has rarely been so much fun' Daily Telegraph.

Poster advertising 2013 revival of The Fastest Clock in the Universe at the Old Red Lion . The Methuen Drama Guide to Contemporary British Playwrights.

Poster advertising 2013 revival of The Fastest Clock in the Universe at the Old Red Lion Theatre. Written by. Philip Ridley. Three men, two women, aged 15-88. Like Ridley's previous play The Pitchfork Disney, The Fastest Clock was considered shocking for its time but generated considerable more controversy due to it featuring scenes of violence onstage  . Pages 430 - 3. Aleks Sierz (2012). Modern British Playwriting: The 1990s: Voices, Documents, New Interpretations.

Philip Ridley's multi-award-winning play caused a sensation when it. .Written in 1992, this is the most apt cultural portrait ever created of the modern monster of gay male vanity.

Philip Ridley's multi-award-winning play caused a sensation when it premiered at Hampstead Theatre in 1992. A provocative and edgy drama, it is now regarded as a contemporary classic. Set in a strange room in East London, party preparations are underway but the presence of a very, very sharp knife does not bode well for an entirely happy birthday. Eerily dead-on in its prediction of obsessions with youth, beauty, and sex.

Poster advertising the 2013 London revival of The Fastest Clock in the Universe at the Old Red Lion . London, Great Britain: Methuen Drama.

Poster advertising the 2013 London revival of The Fastest Clock in the Universe at the Old Red Lion Theatre. Three male and two female. Like Ridley's previous play The Pitchfork Disney, The Fastest Clock was considered shocking for its time but generated considerable more controversy due to it featuring scenes of violence onstage as well as descriptions of animal cruelty  . Sierz, Aleks (24 May 2012).

Philip Ridley was born in the East End of London where he still lives and works. As well plays for young people and the highly acclaimed screenplay for the The Krays feature film, his plays for adults include The Pitchfork Disney, Leaves of Glass, Piranha Heights and the highly controversial Mercury Fur. Country of Publication.

Modern Slavery Statement TREMers in association with Dréim Productions presents The Fastest Clock.

Modern Slavery Statement. Home News & Features Theatre News The Fastest Clock In The Universe by Philip Ridley. The Fastest Clock In The Universe by Philip Ridley. Thursday, 15 August, 2013. TREMers in association with Dréim Productions presents The Fastest Clock In The Universe by Philip Ridley, at the Old Red Lion Theatre, a 60-seat fringe venue above the pub, in Angel north London, from 5 to 30 Nov 2013. Directed by Tom O’Brien, cast includes Joshua Blake (Cougar Glass), Ian Houghton (Captain Tock), Dylan Llewellyn (Foxtrot Darling), Ania Marson (Cheetah Bee), Nancy Sullivan (Sherbet Gravel)

It's Cougar's birthday. He's having a party. And the gift he'd kill for is youth. . .

In a strange room in East London the party preparations are under way. Everything has been planned to the last detail. Surely nothing can go wrong? After all, there's the specially made birthday cake, the specially written cards, the specially chosen guest of honour. . . and a very, very sharp knife.

Philip Ridley's edgy and provocative drama caused a sensation when it premiered at Hampstead Theatre in 1992, winning the Evening Standard Award for Most Promising Newcomer to the Stage and the Meyer Whitworth Prize. It is now regarded as a contemporary classic.

'A bit like a ride on a ghost train. . . you find yourself shuddering with shock and laughing uproariously. . . horror has rarely been so much fun' Daily Telegraph

'Scorchingly nasty. . . fingers an age and its icons with terrifying accuracy' Guardian

Comments:

SING
I would just like to provide a counter view to the rather prudish one-star review. Yes, the play falls into the genre of grotesque black comedy and Phillip Ridley revels in creating a dark surreal fantasy world. These characters are not you and me; they're the sort of people we have nightmareas about.

Cougar Glass is a narcississtic thirty-year-old for whom every birthday is his 19th. The relationship between him and his friend Captain, who unrequitedly loves him, is comically endearing but also tragic as we see the effort Captain goes to maintain Cougar's perverse fantasies. His "nineteenth" birthday party is really just an excuse to seduce beautiful schoolboy Foxtrot Darling (yes, the names are wonderful). Unfortunately Foxtrot is straight, and he turns up with pregnant fiancee Sherbert. Then in the tradition of Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf and other dinner party plays, the fun begins.

Ridley's talent is to mix childhood fantasy with dark perversity. Whilst the play is dark in many respects, there's also something quite innocent about it. The characters are well-developed and the dynamics are strong. If you want to say what the play is about, it's about adults who are obsessively and unnaturally in love with their youth, and how those who love them perpetuate these fantasies just to stop the fragile protagonists from breaking.
Erienan
The Fastest Clock in the Universe is not a play I would recommend reading, and certainly not a play I would recommend seeing. Although it contains a fascinating, well-developed group of characters, the play is so completely lacking morality of any sort that it leaves readers and viewers wanting. I found the character Cougar, the gay pedophile desperately trying to stay young, both interesting and revolting, the latter being the stronger of the two feelings. My reason for finding him repulsive was not that it was too difficult to consider what people in "the real world" might be like, but that, to spite all his apparent charm, there was nothing human in his character. The age-old fear of losing one's youth didn't even make him remotely human. Instead, I felt like he was a mix between a machine and some untamable creature. It did not help, as a reader, that most of the other characters in the play came off as being mechanical too. Although Sherbet is bubbly and vivacious, she seems to be a broken record until the very end. Throughout, you feel like these are wild animals, beasts that cannot control themselves and will not be controlled by others. They are not even desperate for survival, which is a natural instinct; they are preoccupied only with getting what they want. The idea of humans having no real control is an interesting point of debate and discussions for many psychologists. Personally, I find that this theory demeans the human experience, and the promotion of it is not something I find even mildly entertaining. The twisted exploration of loose sex and messed-up relationships is also not worth reading about, mainly because it doesn't explore a single searching questions on either topic. They're just there. Questions should be asked, especially in writing of a creative nature. This gives your audience something to look at. They will hopefully reap something from the exchange of words and time. Honestly, to say it again, this play is just there. There is a slight stab at asking questions about "love" but they are not sincerely asked and leave nothing to think about.

Another problem that I have difficulty accepting in creative writing: there is absolutely nothing good in anyone in the entire play; no one, not even the victims, has any redeeming qualities at all. As an actor, I found it really difficult to find emotions in the characters because they seemed like stone to me.

I feel like I would be able to say that The Fastest Clock in the Universe was well written were it not for the fact that every other sentence is the contains one if not two or three f-words. Take that lovely little expletive out and the play would probably lose a third of its volume. Don't get me wrong, I have no problem with strong language that promotes a character and that is necessary to express a point. However, the word was used beyond what was needed and just left a bad taste in my mouth. In the end, as much as I was hoping to attribute something good to this play, I find the only positive thing I can say comes from the perspective of the performer. It provided a serious challenge, which can be really fun to make an attempt at resolving. However, as a reader, I found The Fastest Clock in the Universe not just dissatisfying, but degrading. I felt like I had been left off worse upon its completion, than I was before I opened it up.

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