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Download Privacy Payoff: How Successful Businesses Build Customer Trust fb2, epub

by Ph.D. Ann Cavoukian,Don Tapscott,Tyler J. Hamilton

Download Privacy Payoff: How Successful Businesses Build Customer Trust fb2, epub

ISBN: 0070905606
Author: Ph.D. Ann Cavoukian,Don Tapscott,Tyler J. Hamilton
Language: English
Publisher: McGraw-Hill (2002)
Pages: 332
Category: Small Business & Entrepreneurship
Subcategory: Money
Rating: 4.5
Votes: 359
Size Fb2: 1282 kb
Size ePub: 1902 kb
Size Djvu: 1287 kb
Other formats: docx lrf rtf azw


While Cavoukian's first book was consumer-oriented, this book is aimed at the small to medium business market .

While Cavoukian's first book was consumer-oriented, this book is aimed at the small to medium business market, providing an excellent insight into the importance of good privacy practices. In 12 chapters, this 300 page plus book addresses the significance of good data protection as a leading business issue (stating unequivocally that heightened post 9-11 government security concerns have absolutely nothing to do with the business need to address consumer privacy). Make space on your bookshelf for The PRIVACY PAYOFF: How Successful Businesses Build Customer Trust, a valuable new business primer on privacy by Ann Cavoukian and Tyler Hamilton.

Privacy Payoff: How Successful Businesses Build Customer Trust

Privacy Payoff: How Successful Businesses Build Customer Trust. No other recent book explains the many issues concerning privacy and technology as straightforwardly and comprehensively as Ann Cavoukian and Don Tapscott's /IWho Knows: Safeguarding Your Privacy in Networked World/N" - Jones, Don, The Wahington Times, 1/26/97.

It is shown how many Privacy Services work together to form the privacy protection framework. An examination of what current approaches to protecting privacy in an SOA environment is also presented.

Privacy Payoff: How Successful Businesses Build Customer Trust, Ann Cavoukian, Tyler J. Hamilton & Don Tapscott, published in 2002 by McGraw-Hill. Cavoukian, Ann; Hamilton, Tyler J. (2002). The Privacy Payoff: How Successful Businesses Build Customer Trust.

Ann Cavoukian (born October 7, 1952) is the former Information and Privacy Commissioner for the Canadian province of Ontario. Tyler Hamilton: The Privacy Payoff: How Successful Businesses Build Customer Trust, 2002. Don Tapscott: Who Knows: Safeguarding Your Privacy in a Networked World, 1997. 2014 – Top 50 Power List (Maclean's Magazine). 2014 – Power 50 (Canadian Business Magazine).

Don Tapscott, Ann Cavoukian, Tyler J Hamilton. The Privacy Payoff is the privacy primer for business that senior managers need to ensure their organizations avoid the risks of the privacy minefield and reap the business drafteess of becoming a privacy-sensitive corporation

Ann Cavoukian, Tyler J. Hamilton. ISBN 9780070905603 (978-0-07-090560-3) Hardcover, McGraw-Hill, 2002.

Ann Cavoukian, Tyler J. Who Knows: Safeguarding Your Privacy in a Networked World. by Ann Cavoukian, Don Tapscott. ISBN 9780070633209 (978-0-07-06332) Hardcover, McGraw-Hill, 1997.

Cavoukian A. and Hamilton . Privacy Payoff: How Successful Businesses Build Customer Trust. McGraw–Hill Ryerson Limited, New York Google Scholar

Cavoukian A. McGraw–Hill Ryerson Limited, New York Google Scholar. 7. Cohen J. and Cohen P. (1983). Applied Multiple on Analysis for the Behavioral Sciences, 2nd edn.

5 The Privacy Payoff: How Successful Businesses Build Customer Trust, Ann Cavoukian, P. and Tyler J. 6 Bruce Kasanoff, Making it personal: how to profit from personalization without invading privacy (Perseus, October 2001), . 5. 10 Privacy and Radical Pragmatism: Change the Paradigm.

Ann Cavoukian - Chair. Distinguished Expert-in-Residence, Privacy by Design Centre of Excellence (Ryerson University), Canada. Dr. Ann Cavoukian is recognized as one of the world’s leading privacy experts. Cavoukian served an unprecedented three terms as the Information & Privacy Commissioner of Ontario, Canada. Cavoukian is the author of two books, The Privacy Payoff: How Successful Businesses Build Customer Trust with Tyler Hamilton, and Who Knows: Safeguarding Your Privacy in a Networked World with Don Tapscott.

Comments:

furious ox
I've been interested in privacy issues for a while, both as a consumer and from a business perspective. Most of the books I've seen out there have been geared at consumers, and tend to make out companies as villains. This book is the first I've seen that deals with the issue of consumer privacy while at the same time being sensitive to business issues. It's the only "business" book on consumer privacy I've seen, at least the only overview of the issue. Parts of the book could have benefitted with a few more examples, but all and all, it was a great overview of an important issue. Any businesses that collect and use customer information should have this book. Being in the U.S. (I'm a Canadian living in New York), I felt it had the right balance of U.S. content but also gave me a solid look at what's happening in the rest of the world. Information doesn't respect borders, so I found the more international flavour of Privacy Payoff to be refreshing as well. OK, I've been rambling to long... what I really mean to say is the book was well worth the purchase.
Slowly writer
This book will appeal more to U.S. readers as it is fully of American case law than to Canadians or other international audiences. There is no comparison of jurisdictions making it diffuclt to know what the best practices are and what the statutes actually say.
The few international examples included in the book seem to come out of left field and are not placed in content. No reason is given as to why a certain example is even used in the book.
Fararala
Make space on your bookshelf for The PRIVACY PAYOFF: How Successful Businesses Build Customer Trust, a valuable new business primer on privacy by Ann Cavoukian and Tyler Hamilton. Cavoukian is the Information and Privacy Commissioner of Ontario and co-author of a previous book on privacy entitled Who Knows: safeguarding your privacy in a networked world. Hamilton is a business reporter and technology columnist at the Toronto Star who has covered consumer privacy issues extensively.
While Cavoukian's first book was consumer-oriented, this book is aimed at the small to medium business market, providing an excellent insight into the importance of good privacy practices.
In 12 chapters, this 300 page plus book addresses the significance of good data protection as a leading business issue (stating unequivocally that heightened post 9-11 government security concerns have absolutely nothing to do with the business need to address consumer privacy).
Chapters 3 and 4 address the fundamental concepts of privacy and the development of fair information practices or FIPS, with an explanation of how these FIPs have been translated into various codes (OECD, CSA and the FTC's "Big Four"). Chapter 4 goes on to describe the global regulatory environment, including the development of the EU Directive and the impacts of article 25 (adequacy of non EU-nation data protection), as well as the development of PIPEDA and the U.S. Safe Harbor arrangement. Other key U.S. privacy laws are also briefly summarized and there is a short comment on Asia/Pacific privacy legislation.
Chapter 5 looks at the need for business to take a comprehensive approach to privacy implementation beginning with a privacy diagnosis. Some tools are highlighted that businesses can use to assess their own current level of privacy principles compliance and shortcomings, including a Privacy Risk Assessment Test developed by Forrester Research Inc.
Some readers of this book may turn to chapter 6 first where the authors include profiles on six Chief Privacy Officers (five U.S.) including IBM's Harriet Pearson and Peter Cullen of the RBC Financial Group, who reports a 50 percent drop in privacy complaints since RBC committed to a high profile approach to privacy protection to maintain customer trust and achieve competitive differentiation. Jules Polonetsky of DoubleClick, which has had a roller-coaster ride of privacy problems, Kirk Herath of Nationwide Insurance Companies, Zoe Strickland of the US Postal Service, and Oliver Johnson of Merck & Co. are also profiled. All of the CPOs offer useful advice on the processes of privacy management within large and diversified organizations - see especially Zoe Strickland's five-point list.
Chapter 7 covers safeguards leaks, glitches and breaches with descriptions of viruses, worms and Trojan Horses, first-hand evidence on the perils of unsecured wireless networks, and a bottom-line comment that "sorry isn't enough."
In Chapter 8, the authors focus on consumer worries about digital data shadows, solutions to the cookies problem, the privacy risks of biometrics, satellite tracking, electronic tags, interactive TV, and other similar devices, and the growing, in fact alarming, increase in identity theft.
Chapters 9 and 10 cover the impacts of such consumer fears on marketing activities and the big issue of workplace privacy (there are excellent tips for employers on pages 247-249).
Chapter 11 covers technologies that can be used to enhance privacy (an ongoing focus of the Ontario Commissioner) and chapter 12 concludes with very practical advice on a privacy action plan for business. The "Top 25 Tips for Privacy Payoff" list is useful and practical.
This book is well researched and any observations and conclusions made by the authors are well-supported by factual detail and analysis. If there is any criticism of this book for a Canadian reader it is the orientation towards the U.S. marketplace as a source of research, examples of privacy issues, CPO profiles, and in some cases, even legislation. For example, a discussion of workplace privacy law starts off with a discussion of the U.S. Electronic Communications Privacy Act. It is only two pages later that Canada's private sector privacy law and its effect on workplace surveillance is briefly mentioned. While the authors cannot be faulted in aiming their book at the larger market of U.S. corporations (their publisher, McGraw-Hill, owner of Standard & Poor's and Business Week, is one of the world's biggest business publishing houses), and U.S. privacy mistakes by business tend to have far more dramatic impacts, more Canadian focussed content would have been desirable.
Nevertheless, this is an excellent primer for any business reader seeking to understand the broad issues of privacy protection in the commercial world and the business imperative to implement a thorough and cohesive privacy program. The practical advice in Chapter 12 alone makes the book worth every cent. For readers interested in Ann Cavoukian's views on opt in and opt-out consent, the book is also worth the money.
Murray Long, Canadian privacy consultant and journalist
N.B. This review taken from my electronic privacy newsletter
Coiwield
Make space on your bookshelf for The PRIVACY PAYOFF: How Successful Businesses Build Customer Trust, a valuable new business primer on privacy by Ann Cavoukian and Tyler Hamilton. Cavoukian is the Information and Privacy Commissioner of Ontario and co-author of a previous book on privacy entitled Who Knows: safeguarding your privacy in a networked world. Hamilton is a business reporter and technology columnist at the Toronto Star who has covered consumer privacy issues extensively.
While Cavoukian's first book was consumer-oriented, this book is aimed at the small to medium business market, providing an excellent insight into the importance of good privacy practices.
In 12 chapters, this 300 page plus book addresses the significance of good data protection as a leading business issue (stating unequivocally that heightened post 9-11 government security concerns have absolutely nothing to do with the business need to address consumer privacy).
Chapters 3 and 4 address the fundamental concepts of privacy and the development of fair information practices or FIPS, with an explanation of how these FIPs have been translated into various codes (OECD, CSA and the FTC's "Big Four"). Chapter 4 goes on to describe the global regulatory environment, including the development of the EU Directive and the impacts of article 25 (adequacy of non EU-nation data protection), as well as the development of PIPEDA and the U.S. Safe Harbor arrangement. Other key U.S. privacy laws are also briefly summarized and there is a short comment on Asia/Pacific privacy legislation.
Chapter 5 looks at the need for business to take a comprehensive approach to privacy implementation beginning with a privacy diagnosis. Some tools are highlighted that businesses can use to assess their own current level of privacy principles compliance and shortcomings, including a Privacy Risk Assessment Test developed by Forrester Research Inc.
Some readers of this book may turn to chapter 6 first where the authors include profiles on six Chief Privacy Officers (five U.S.) including IBM's Harriet Pearson and Peter Cullen of the RBC Financial Group, who reports a 50 percent drop in privacy complaints since RBC committed to a high profile approach to privacy protection to maintain customer trust and achieve competitive differentiation. Jules Polonetsky of DoubleClick, which has had a roller-coaster ride of privacy problems, Kirk Herath of Nationwide Insurance Companies, Zoe Strickland of the US Postal Service, and Oliver Johnson of Merck & Co. are also profiled. All of the CPOs offer useful advice on the processes of privacy management within large and diversified organizations - see especially Zoe Strickland's five-point list.
Chapter 7 covers safeguards leaks, glitches and breaches with descriptions of viruses, worms and Trojan Horses, first-hand evidence on the perils of unsecured wireless networks, and a bottom-line comment that "sorry isn't enough."
In Chapter 8, the authors focus on consumer worries about digital data shadows, solutions to the cookies problem, the privacy risks of biometrics, satellite tracking, electronic tags, interactive TV, and other similar devices, and the growing, in fact alarming, increase in identity theft.
Chapters 9 and 10 cover the impacts of such consumer fears on marketing activities and the big issue of workplace privacy (there are excellent tips for employers on pages 247-249).
Chapter 11 covers technologies that can be used to enhance privacy (an ongoing focus of the Ontario Commissioner) and chapter 12 concludes with very practical advice on a privacy action plan for business. The "Top 25 Tips for Privacy Payoff" list is useful and practical.
This book is well researched and any observations and conclusions made by the authors are well-supported by factual detail and analysis. If there is any criticism of this book for a Canadian reader it is the orientation towards the U.S. marketplace as a source of research, examples of privacy issues, CPO profiles, and in some cases, even legislation. For example, a discussion of workplace privacy law starts off with a discussion of the U.S. Electronic Communications Privacy Act. It is only two pages later that Canada's private sector privacy law and its effect on workplace surveillance is briefly mentioned. While the authors cannot be faulted in aiming their book at the larger market of U.S. corporations (their publisher, McGraw-Hill, owner of Standard & Poor's and Business Week, is one of the world's biggest business publishing houses), and U.S. privacy mistakes by business tend to have far more dramatic impacts, more Canadian focussed content would have been desirable.
Nevertheless, this is an excellent primer for any business reader seeking to understand the broad issues of privacy protection in the commercial world and the business imperative to implement a thorough and cohesive privacy program. The practical advice in Chapter 12 alone makes the book worth every cent. For readers interested in Ann Cavoukian's views on opt in and opt-out consent, the book is also worth the money.
Murray Long, Canadian privacy consultant and journalist
N.B. This review taken from my electronic privacy newsletter

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