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by John Kenneth Galbraith

Download Economics and the Public Purpose fb2, epub

ISBN: 0233965254
Author: John Kenneth Galbraith
Language: English
Publisher: HarperCollins Distribution Services; 3rd Edition edition (March 14, 1974)
Pages: 352
Category: Economics
Subcategory: Money
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 720
Size Fb2: 1785 kb
Size ePub: 1805 kb
Size Djvu: 1348 kb
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Economics and the Public Purpose is a 1973 book by Harvard economist John Kenneth Galbraith.

Economics and the Public Purpose is a 1973 book by Harvard economist John Kenneth Galbraith. Galbraith advocates a "new socialism" as the solution, nationalising military production and public services such as health care. He also advocates introducing disciplined wage, salary, profit and price controls on the economy to reduce inequality and restrain the power of giant corporations.

John Kenneth Galbraith is a Canadian-born American economist who is perhaps the most widely read economist in the world. He taught at Harvard from 1934-1939 and then again from 1949-1975. An adviser to President John F. Kennedy, he served from 1961 to 1963 as . His style and wit in writing and his frequent media appearances have contributed greatly to his fame as an economist. Galbraith believes that it is not sufficient for government to manage the level of effective demand; government must manage the market itself.

John Kenneth Galbraith (1908-2006) was a Canadian-American economist, who taught at Harvard University, served . He begins with the observation that not only does General Motors exist to serve the public, but "General Motors also serves itself

John Kenneth Galbraith (1908-2006) was a Canadian-American economist, who taught at Harvard University, served as . He begins with the observation that not only does General Motors exist to serve the public, but "General Motors also serves itself. Pg. 3) He asserts that no innovation of importance originates with the individual farmer.

Start by marking Economics and the Public Purpose as Want to Read . So far as I know, this is the book in which John Kenneth Galbraith came out of the closet and declared himself a democratic socialist.

Start by marking Economics and the Public Purpose as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

John Kenneth Galbraith, Economics and the Public Purpose (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1973). All page and chapter references in the text are to this work. 8. Scott Gordon, The Close of the Galbraithian System, Journal of Political Economy 76 (1968): 635–644CrossRefGoogle Scholar. Myron E. Sharpe, John Kenneth Galbraith and the Lower Economics (New York: Macmillan, 1973), p. 4. oogle Scholar.

2 people like this topic.

The planning system also comes in ahead of the market system where public policy and public support are concerned (as seen when one compares, for instance, the aerospace sector and the construction industry). However, both these systems still come in ahead of the broader public interest.

John Kenneth Galbraith, the iconoclastic economist, teacher and diplomat and an unapologetically liberal member of. .

John Kenneth Galbraith, the iconoclastic economist, teacher and diplomat and an unapologetically liberal member of the political and academic establishment he often needled in prolific writings for more than half a century, died Saturday at a hospital in Cambridge, Mass. He was 97. Mr. Galbraith lived in Cambridge and at an "unfarmed farm" near Newfane, Vt. His death was confirmed by his son J. Alan Galbraith.

John Kenneth Galbraith OC (October 15, 1908 – April 29, 2006), also known as Ken Galbraith, was a Canadian-born economist, public official, and diplomat, and a leading proponent of 20th-century American liberalism

John Kenneth Galbraith OC (October 15, 1908 – April 29, 2006), also known as Ken Galbraith, was a Canadian-born economist, public official, and diplomat, and a leading proponent of 20th-century American liberalism. His books on economic topics were bestsellers from the 1950s through the 2000s, during which time Galbraith fulfilled the role of public intellectual. As an economist, he leaned toward post-Keynesian economics from an institutionalist perspective.

the hegemony of accepted beliefs, which exclude the possibility of all contrary. time Galbraith was a teenager, his Uncle John had become a heavy drinker and. the whole family dropped the John in favor of Ken. Galbraith, 1952a) and A Theory of Price Control (Galbraith, 1952b), plus a.

Shipped from UK, please allow 10 to 21 business days for arrival. Good, A very good/good, clean and sound copy in light olive/beige cloth boards, gilt title on spine and good, clean and unfaded dust jacket.

Comments:

Yozshujind
This was part of a trilogy that began with *The Affluent Society* (1957), and continued with *The New Industrial State* (1967). However, as Galbraith readily concedes, he learned a great deal in the intervals between writing these books. In 1958, Galbraith's political career was on an upward trajectory; by 1967 he had ruptured with Pres. Johnson over the Vietnam War, and in 1974 he had become reconciled to life in the political and academic wilderness.

For strangers to Galbraith's views, it is necessary to understand that he was first and foremost a student of what was, rather than idealized systems. Hence, many of his critics, faced with a dualistic world view, will accuse him of favoring a command economy, on the grounds that he was critical of the pretensions of capitalist economies. I hope readers will immediately see the error of this way of thinking: a clear-sighted analysis of a system that embraces the whole of a society's transactions cannot possibly be reduced to a dualistic judgment.

Second, Galbraith was an institutionalist. While orthodox schools of economics tend to emphasize the inherent, automatic nature of all economic transactions regardless of the nature of the agents, institutionalists such as T. Veblen, J. Commons, C. Ayres, and Galbraith identify the economic agents--viz., institutions in the society--as the decisive factor. Galbraith frequently aroused a lot of ire by pointing out the shortcomings of a social science (economics) being dominated by political demagogues, although he preferred to say this using dry wit.

In this book, he unites several concepts into an explanatory system. One of these is the concept of the "convenient social virtue," the tendency of people to profusely admire traits in other people they are not prepared to compensate; hence, the admiration of workers whose sense of duty and self-sacrifice transcends any rational economic explanation. He applies this analysis to women, who remain an undercompensated cadre of the workforce. Another concept is that of "the market system" as distinct from the "planning system"; usually economists and demagogues speak of the public sector [bad] versus the private sector [good], as if there were nothing but kinship between the multinational corporation and the corner espresso cart.

Galbraith explains that, while the giant industrial firm has very different needs and wants from small shops, it is likely to be very closely aligned to the needs and wants of those holding political power. Hence, the boundary between public and private sectors is less meaningful than that between the planning and the market systems. While the market system is admired, it is also punished with far greater danger and with "self-exploitation" by desperate proprietors.

The illusion that we live in an economy that is a free market, with an adversarial relationship to the state, is a dangerous one. First, it leads to people assuming that problems of waste and unemployment will solve themselves once an obvious regulatory obstacle is removed. In reality, we live in a planned economy ridden by systems of price controls and monopoly, and that planning is designed to serve industrial management. Assuming the opposite, of course, will only make such problems worse.

Second, it is dangerous because we overlook the influence of the planning system on the basic purpose of the state. The insistence of economist-demagogues is that the state is miraculously devoted to the toiling masses, and intent on expropriating the creative fountainhead, John Galt and Henry Reardon. Militarism is assumed to be therefore a rational response to a genuine foreign threat; whereas if the influence is understood to be symmetric, or even understood to flow the other direction, then one will expect militarism to serve the planning system and one will be skeptical of it.

There's a lot more in this book, and I believe it deserves a far better review than I've supplied. But I hope this gives a taste of the issues that Galbraith addresses.
Mysterious Wrench
I don't understand it... There are thousands of books out there, all sorts of garbage that you can find at any run-of-the-mill bookstore, and when there is a provocative and profound study of the ailments of society, and HOW they can be CORRECTED...it cannot be heard - for it is OUT OF PRINT. And most people only care about the Fabio-cover pages and unimaginative fiction. As JKG puts it "[life in society] can also be pleasant - a womb in which the individual rests without the pain of mental activity or decision."
JKG wrote this in the Affluent Society : "Nothing counts so heavily against a man as to be found attacking the values of the public at large and seeking to substitute his own. Technically, his crime is arrogance. Actually, it is ignorance of the rules. In any case, he is automatically removed from the game." I'm not sure if he was 'seeking to substitute his own' ideas, but he gave an option for emancipation - to free oneselve from persuasive grasp of big business. So I guess Economics and the Public Purpose broke the rules by enlightening the readship to this option, and it is now destined to be left in the care of a few university libraries and the occasional footnote.
Tragic. It's a really good book.
Utchanat
John Kenneth Galbraith (1908-2006) was a Canadian-American economist, who taught at Harvard University, served as U.S. Ambassador to India (1961-1963), and wrote a number of bestselling books, such as American Capitalism,The Affluent Society (A Mentor Book),The New Industrial State (James Madison Library in American Politics),The Great Crash 1929,The Age of Uncertainty (which was a TV series on the BBC), etc.

He wrote in the Foreword to this 1973 book, "This book is in descent, the last in the line, from two earlier volumes---'The Affluent Society' and 'The New Industrial State.' There are also some genes, though not many, from ... 'American Capitalism.' ... The earlier volumes were centrally concerned with the world of the great corporations... There is also the world of the farmer, repairman, retailer, small manufacturer... This book seeks to bring them fully into the scene... This (book also) gives the first elements of the international scene."

He begins with the observation that not only does General Motors exist to serve the public, but "General Motors also serves itself." (Pg. 3) He asserts that no innovation of importance originates with the individual farmer. "Were it not for the government and farm equipment and chemical firms, agriculture would be technologically stagnant." (Pg. 48)

He notes that the market system is subordinate to the planning system, which supplies power, fuel, machinery, transportation, communications, etc. He then contrasts the "relatively secure and favorable income for participants in the planning system" versus a "less secure and less favorable return for those in the market system." (Pg. 50) He suggests that the growth in acquisitions of one firm by another is motivated less by monetary rewards, than by the "prestige" of "not a greater rate of return but a greater size." (Pg. 101)

The technostructure thus favors a policy that keeps prices under control, and then serves its affirmative interest in the growth of the firm. (Pg. 115) Galbraith invents the term "Bureaucratic Symbiosis" for the tendency of public and private organizations to "find and pursue a common purpose." (Pg. 139) He asserts that the small businessman and farmer are "extremely vulnerable to adversity emanating from the planning system." (Pg. 177)

He concludes that "the economy must be managed"; but not one economy, but two: "one that is subject to the market and one that is planned by its constituent firms." (Pg. 214) He proposes that conversion of "the fully mature corporations... into public corporations." (Pg. 261)

Not as innovative or thought-provoking as the earlier three volumes, this book nevertheless represents an important continuation in the development of Galbraith's thought.

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