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Download Nauvoo Polygamy: ... but we called it celestial marriage fb2, epub

by George D. Smith

Download Nauvoo Polygamy: ... but we called it celestial marriage fb2, epub

ISBN: 1560852011
Author: George D. Smith
Language: English
Publisher: Signature Books; 1st Edition edition (December 5, 2008)
Pages: 705
Category: History & Criticism
Subcategory: Literature
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 863
Size Fb2: 1183 kb
Size ePub: 1307 kb
Size Djvu: 1223 kb
Other formats: lit lrf mbr lrf


Nauvoo Polygamy is very readable and would be excellent for the interested reader to get a better idea of the early stages of plural marriage

Nauvoo Polygamy is very readable and would be excellent for the interested reader to get a better idea of the early stages of plural marriage. In his introduction, George Smith acknowledges how the LDS Church has kept a distance from officially recognizing the important aspects of polygamy. On page xvii, he writes how Smith’s wives remain unacknowledged in the official History of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

Nauvoo Polygamy book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Nauvoo Polygamy:. But We Called It Celestial Marriage" as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Nauvoo Polygamy book.

George Smith's Nauvoo Polygamy is an excellent book. He undertakes the unenviable task of fleshing out the details of an institution that played a central role in Mormon society and culture during the nineteenth century

George Smith's Nauvoo Polygamy is an excellent book. He undertakes the unenviable task of fleshing out the details of an institution that played a central role in Mormon society and culture during the nineteenth century. As with many Latter-day Saints in the Intermountain West, I had polygamists on both sides of my family. At least one her served a term in the territorial penitentiary for unlawful cohabitation

Smith's son Joseph Smith III, his lawful widow Emma Smith, and most members of the Reorganized Church of. .but we called it celestial marriage" (2nd e., Salt Lake City: Signature Books, ISBN 978-1-56085-207-0, LCCN.

Smith's son Joseph Smith III, his lawful widow Emma Smith, and most members of the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (RLDS Church) attempted for years to refute the evidence of plural marriages., Salt Lake City: Signature Books, ISBN 978-1-56085-207-0, LCCN 2010032062, OCLC 656848353, archived from the original on 2014-12-02.

Nauvoo Polygamy: 'We Called It Celestial Marriage'. Free Inquiry 28:44-45 (2008). This article has no associated abstract. No keywords specified (fix it). Categories. Ethics in Value Theory, Miscellaneous.

Criticism of oo Polygamy. lt; Criticism of Mormonism‎ Books. Table of Contents but we called it celestial marriage" but we called it celestial marriage", a work by author: George D. Smith. Response to claim: 55 - When polygamy was officially abandoned in 1890, that "what previously had been called 'celestial marriage' was subtly redefined to specify something new. Response to claim: 55 - "Despite his crowded daily schedule, the prophet interrupted other activities for secret liaisons with women and girls".

Items related to Nauvoo Polygamy - " but we called it celestial. George Smith shows how many of the prophet’s followers embraced plural marriage during a period when the LDS Church was emphatically denying the practice. a lucid writing style. Home Smith, George D. Nauvoo Polygamy - " but we called it celestial marriage". Daniel Walker Howe, Pulitzer Prize winning author of What Hath God Wrought: The Transformation of America, 1815-1848. An extremely important contribution to the history of polygamy. that allows us to see how Joseph Smith’s marriages fit into the context of his daily life.

Personal Name: Smith, George D. (George Dempster), 1938-. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book Nauvoo polygamy : "but we called it celestial marriage", George D.

Young was named president of the LDS Church on December 5, 1847, near Winter Quarters, where he had returned after investigating the Salt Lake Valley. Colonization had been delayed through the winter of 1846 by the selection and organization of troops to march on Mexico. Away from Brigham Young’s leadership, Brannan’s California Saints would resist the polygamous emphasis of the Utah Saints.

When Joseph and Emma Smith arrived in Ohio in 1831, several families offered them lodging, as did the Whitneys, whose five year-old daughter, Sarah Ann, and her eleven-year-old neighbor, Mary Elizabeth Rollins, would later play a role in Mormon polygamy. The Smiths soon moved in with the Johnsons, where Joseph met fifteen-year-old Marinda Nancy. In 1836, seven-year-old Helen Mar Kimball attended school near the Smith home. Each of these girls, whom Joseph met during the 1830s, would later marry him in the 1840s gathering place of Nauvoo, Illinois, on the east bank of the Mississippi River. In this thoroughly researched and documented work, the author shows how the prophet introduced single and married women to this new form of "celestial marrige"—a granted to the elect men of Nauvoo. Through their journals, letters, and affidavits, the participants tell their stories in intimate detail—before polygamy was forcibly abandoned and nearly forgotten.

Comments:

Cha
With the admissions made by the Mormon leadership over 2014 regarding polygamy, no longer can critics say this information presented on Mormon polygamy is nothing more than bad “anti-Mormon” argumentation.

Giving thanks to his wife and children for their patience, George D. Smith, one of the founders of Signature Books, shows plenty of scholarship in his almost-700-page book Nauvoo Polygamy that I think should be right next to Todd Compton’s In Sacred Loneliness, Linda King Newell and Valeen Tipppetts Avery's Mormon Enigma: Emma Hale Smith, and Richard Van Wagoner's Mormon Polygamy as must-read books on the topic. Nauvoo Polygamy is very readable and would be excellent for the interested reader to get a better idea of the early stages of plural marriage.

In his introduction, George Smith acknowledges how the LDS Church has kept a distance from officially recognizing the important aspects of polygamy. On page xvii, he writes how “Smith’s wives remain unacknowledged in the official History of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.” Later, on page 5, he explains,

When asked about polygamy on national television in 1998, LDS President Gordon B. Hinckley dismissed its historical importance, positing that “when our people came west [in 1846-47], they permitted [polygamy] on a restricted scaled.” He failed to acknowledge how important the “law of celestial marriage” had been for the church’s founder and his followers. Particularly revealing was how the church president phrased his answer to exclude the entire pre-Utah period of church history. He made it clear he would not welcome any probing into the life of Joseph Smith and his wives or of Smith’s requirement that others embrace the practice.

At first glance this paperback book could feel daunting—it’s almost 700 pages in length—but it is quite readable. There are nine chapters dealing with different aspects of polygamy, which actually could be read out of order for a person who might be interested in focusing on particular aspects of this topic. In chapters 2 through 4, the author takes a closer look at Joseph Smith’s polygamy, with bios writen on each wife. A total of 37 plural wives are credited to Joseph, a number larger than what is given by some scholars but not as many as others. (For example, the number I usually use is the more conservative 33 number based on Todd Compton’s book; this way nobody can say that I am trying to pad the total.)

Joseph Smith's polygamous ways started very early, perhaps even further back than Fanny Alger (who many think was Smith's first plural wife). George Smith writes on page 29:

Emma’s first son died in childbirth on June 15, 1828. While she was in mourning, her cousin Levi Lewis reportedly told Martin Harris that Joseph had tried to “seduce” one of Emma’s friends, Eliza Winters. Lewis said the response from the Book of Mormon financier was that he did not care if Joseph had “attempt[ed] to seduce Eliza Winters &c.,” thereby acknowledging the report.

Many who know about Smith's philanderous ways may assume that the women Joseph Smith ended up marrying must have been widows or “old maids" and their prophet was doing a favor to them by marrying them. However, the idea that Joseph Smith somehow rescued his plural wives from being single is just not accurate. The fact of the matter is that Joseph Smith met the majority of his wives when they were just preteens or teenagers. As George Smith writes,

When the Smiths moved to Ohio in 1831, Joseph there met the majority of his future wives. Most of them were still adolescents—the children of close associates. . . . In most cases, the women were adolescents or in their twenties when he met them. About ten were pre-teens, others already thirty or above. . . . He became acquainted there with some twenty-seven of the women who would later become his mates.

He adds on page 35:

In other words, for a decade prior to Smith’s first plural marriages, he met and established relationships with those who would later become his wives.

Over the years, Joseph Smith nurtured these girls until he married them, with the vast majority of these marriages taking place between 1841 to 1843. At least a quarter of his wives were no older than teenagers when Smith (who was in his late 30s) married them; the majority of his wives were under 30. Only an eighth of Smith’s wives were older than he was at marriage.

On page 36, George Smith provides a list of the plural wives along with the age of their initial meeting. Consider that 9 of these wives (about a quarter) were 12 years of age or under, even as young as 5 (Sarah Ann Whitney) or 6 (Nancy Winchester)! This, I’m sure, would be news for the majority of Latter-day Saints who may have always thought that 19th century polygamy was all about rescuing widows and “old maids” from their dilemma of loneliness and their need to have someone take care of them.

He finishes chapter 1 by writing on page 51, “By the time the Latter-day Saints settled in Illinois, the young women Joseph once met as pre-teenagers had become old enough for him to marry.”

Biographies of each wife Joseph married are given, beginning with Louisa Beaman in April 1841. Each woman's story is described in at least four or five pages. The details in Compton's work is much deeper, but enough of the stories are given in Nauvoo Polygamy for the reader to have a good feel to better understand the circumstances.

Many may wonder how Joseph Smith was able to get so many women to agree to marry him. That issue is dealt with on page 229:

One question that inevitably arises, even a century and a half later, is how Smith persuaded so many teenagers and married women, all of Puritan New England stock, to become his wives.

The answer to this question is that marrying someone higher up in the LDS hierarchy was considered prestigious for blessings in the next life. George Smith writes,

This is why Presendia Buell, Zina Jacobs, and Mary Elizabeth Lightner risked their marriages to non-Mormons or church members of low ecclesiastical status for a secret marriage with the prophet. This took them to the head of the line at the gates of heaven.

On page 376, a quote is borrowed from Gary James Bergera who says that these women married Smith

primarily as a show of loyalty, obedience, and sacrifice to Smith, coupled with Smith’s assurance that blessings unimaginable awaited them. For Smith, plural marriage represented the pinnacle of his theology of exaltation: the husband as king and priest, surrounded by queens and priestesses eternally procreating spirit children. . . [for] additional glory, power, and exaltation—the entire process of exaltation cycling forever worlds without end.

Beginning in chapter 4, George Smith delves into issues involving general polygamy during the days in Nauvoo. The statistics are telling. For instance, by 1846 (the year Brigham Young took the Mormons out of Illinois) there were 521 wives married in Nauvoo to a total of 196 men. Add to that the number of first wives to these men and there was a grand total of 717 wives, or about 3.7 average women per polygamous man. As reported on page 289,

…since institutional histories have minimized the incidence and profile of polygamy, it is easy to imagine that most men who entered polygamy did so in a cursory way. In reality, the typical Utah polygamist whose roots in the principle extended back to Nauvoo had between three and four wives, with a higher incidence of large families.

The other players of early polygamy is dealt with in chapter 4, beginning with Brigham Young. Young ended up having 55 marriages, 15 that ended in separation or divorce. Fifteen of his wives had 55 of his children.

Nauvoo Polygamy is chock full of interesting charts and analysis about how polygamy worked during the first decade of Mormonism's history. All in all, I recommend Nauvoo Polygamy as a worthwhile read, especially for the Latter-day Saint who has never done serious research in this very important matter.
Bukelv
Obviously the writing of this book took a great deal of time and effort on his part, and he probably employed research assistants. I know nothing about the author, but I assume that he is independently wealthy or has wealthy benefactors that allowed him time to write this. The anticipated readership numbers and sales of such a book would not come close to covering his costs, in my opinion. I could not really ascertain if his primary intention in writing this was pursuit of truth or attack of myth and dogma. Given the 'War and Peace' numbers of persons involved, and their relationships, intermingling, intermarriages he wisely knew we would be lost without access to super-computers, and therefore, thankfully!, placed summation tables precisely in places where we otherwise would have abandoned the book.

On finishing it, I had the same feeling of emotional disquiet and even nausea that I experienced at the book review in Provo many years ago of "Mormon Enigma: Emma Hale Smith," delivered by its two authors. Not only their research information, apparently driven by and ending with honest curiosity, but also their retelling of a previous very disappointing encounter that had experienced with Elders Oaks and Maxwell (neither of whom had completely read their book prior to the interrogation/discussion) destroyed my previous beliefs about and perceptions of Joseph. My deepest sense was that those authors had honestly sought and were reporting facts as they found them: they were not trying to destroy anyone or anything. That experience, as well as G Smith's book destroyed my previously held Truman Madsen view of Joseph Smith. That emotional trauma was and is very painful.

I guess this underscores Truman Madsen's reply to a question posed by a student to him in a philosophy course in which I was enrolled at BYU; the student asked him if his reading of original Church historical documents confirmed or damaged his beliefs in the Church's claims: he answered, "Yes!"
HeonIc
This book is extremely well researched. I grew up on a diet of rumors about polygamy in the early days of the Mormon Church. This is the first time I have been able to locate the original sources of this information! What a treat! The author clarified the accounts that were written only by a second hand recorder

I was brought up in polygamy and am now a member of the Mormon Church. The information in the book has solidified my understanding of these confusing days and why polygamists keep living the life style. When my grandfather was sent to Mexico to marry his second wife in 1904 and then repudiated by the Church, I now understand. Why church leaders wouldn't cooperate with the Federal goverment during the late nineteenth century, why Joseph Smith chose to lie to his own wife and others about polygamy while teaching and living it in secret has helped me realize how deeply imbedded dishonest paradigms are in my own culture.

Emotional ties and an addiction to my tribe makes it difficult at my age to permanently move beyond those whom I love and share common values with. But I am grateful to know the truth.

It is good to realize that all religions have shady histories. Since Mormonism is comparitively new, resources about its early days are easier to find.
Drelahuginn
This is a really great book and very readable. It is very well researched! I really recommend it. On top of everything else it's very readable.
Shakanos
Good expose. The more the lies of the Mormon religion started by Joseph Smith Jr. can be exposed, the fewer the people that will be duped by such silly, non-sensical, and family destroying lifestyles as polygamy and polyandry; nothing to do with the teachings of monogamy that God Himself established. Can you believe the Law doesn't do more to rid the world of this awful, hurtful, and destructive man-created problem in our world?
Winail
Great book, very Illuminating!
Joni_Dep
Grew up in Utah and this was sure a subject never discussed!

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