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Download Fighting Angel fb2, epub

by Pearl S. Buck

Download Fighting Angel fb2, epub

ISBN: 0859973743
Author: Pearl S. Buck
Language: English
Publisher: C.Chivers; Large type edition edition (September 19, 1978)
Pages: 344
Category: Contemporary
Subcategory: Literature
Rating: 4.5
Votes: 842
Size Fb2: 1202 kb
Size ePub: 1300 kb
Size Djvu: 1671 kb
Other formats: lrf lrf mbr rtf


Pearl Sydenstricker Buck (June 26, 1892 – March 6, 1973; also known by her Chinese name Sai Zhenzhu; Chinese: 赛珍珠) was an American writer and novelist. As the daughter of missionaries, Buck spent most of her life before 1934 in Zhenjiang, China.

Pearl Sydenstricker Buck (June 26, 1892 – March 6, 1973; also known by her Chinese name Sai Zhenzhu; Chinese: 赛珍珠) was an American writer and novelist. Her novel The Good Earth was the best-selling fiction book in the United States in 1931 and 1932 and won the Pulitzer Prize in 1932

Fighting Angel: Portrait of a Soul (1936) is a memoir, sometimes called a "creative non-fiction novel," written by Pearl S. Buck about her father, Absalom Sydenstricker (1852–1931) as a companion to her memoir of her mother, The Exile.

Fighting Angel: Portrait of a Soul (1936) is a memoir, sometimes called a "creative non-fiction novel," written by Pearl S. The book is a conflicted portrait of her father written in 1936 to take advantage of the success of The Exile but also to tell a different part of her parents’ story

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Fighting Angel: Portrait of a Soul is Pearl S. Buck’s profoundly touching memoir of her zealous Southern Presbyterian missionary father, Absalom Sydenstricker

Fighting Angel: Portrait of a Soul is Pearl S. Buck’s profoundly touching memoir of her zealous Southern Presbyterian missionary father, Absalom Sydenstricker. Andrew (as he is called in the book) set off for China in 1880 and spent most of the next half century there until his death in 1931. From isolated settlements in the poor, hostile interior, he made long preaching trips through lands convulsed by famine, banditry, and revolution. Sydenstricker was a tragic Captain Ahab figure whose life’s work brought only a trickle of converts.

Pearl S. Buck’s timeless masterpiece, the Pulitzer Prize–winning story of a farmer’s journey through China in the . This ebook features an illustrated biography of Pearl S. Buck including rare images from the author’s estate. History & Fiction. Buck’s timeless masterpiece, the Pulitzer Prize–winning story of a farmer’s journey through China in the 1920s. The Good Earth is Buck’s classic story of Wang Lung, a Chinese peasant farmer, and his wife, O-lan, a former slave.

Fighting Angel is a slightly fictionalized story of Pearl Buck's father, and should be read with The Exile, her mother's story.

The biography of the father of Pearl S. Buck. A vigorous biography. Fighting Angel is a slightly fictionalized story of Pearl Buck's father, and should be read with The Exile, her mother's story. Both served as missionaries in China.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. This is the biography of an American missionary in China. It is the life story of Pearl Buck's father. Only the names of the people are changed. Absalom Sydenstricker (1852-1931) (renamed Andrew in the book) was the eighth of nine children born to a Presbyterian farming family in what would become West Virginia. Buck, June 26, 1892 - March 6, 1973 Pearl Sydenstricker Buck was an American author, best know for . She won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1938. Buck, June 26, 1892 - March 6, 1973 Pearl Sydenstricker Buck was an American author, best know for her novels about China. Buck was born on June 26, 1892, in Hillsboro, West Virginia, but as the daughter of Presbyterian missionaries she was taken to China in infancy. During her career, Buck published over 70 books: novels, nonfiction, story collections, children's books, and translations from the Chinese. She also wrote under the pseudonym John Sedges. In the United States, Buck was active in the civil rights and women's rights movements.

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

Comments:

POFOD
God bless Netflix for having that wretched movie "Angel" available for instant streaming. Otherwise I may have never found this wonderful book, which is now one of my all-time favorites. To me this book is flawless--a masterpiece.

This summer I saw the movie "Angel" on Netflix--I thought it was awful, yet I found it intriguing. Being an aspiring writer myself, I found the first half hour especially fascinating--this I watched over and over. Hearing that the star, Romola Garai, considered it her work she was most proud of, I watched it some more to see if it had more to offer than the shallow thrill of watching Angel skyrocket from disgruntled school girl to glamorous author. The movie is really bad, and in many important ways different than the book--not the least of which is how they transformed Angel from an insufferable, unattractive woman with about two redeeming qualities to a gorgeous bombshell whose worse offense seems to be a fatal combination of unrepentant cheekiness and ignorance. That change alone pretty much completely undoes the entire premise of the novel, which is actually about one of the most unattractive and repellent characters you will ever meet.

Elizabeth Taylor does an outstanding job of explaining her characters--they just make sense, as bizarre as their lives sometimes are. Often in literature the picture does not add up--the author loves their characters too much to show us his real warts and instead just shoves on us a couple tired character flaws (pride! never knowing when to give up! a fear of water!). Angel is an exaggerated version of a person we have all met. She is self-absorbed to the max, oblivious to the world around her where it does not serve her purposes (she lives solely for praise and admiration, notices the criticism but condemns it without hesitation and therefore ignores it--and she is completely oblivious to the suffering of those closest to her: her mother, her husband, her friend Nora, and her many pets who are left to die in anguish and neglect even while she deludes herself that she is some kind of heroic animal rights activist.) But Elizabeth Taylor does not just use the book to drive home some point about, "Isn't this woman just awful? Isn't she terrible? Ha ha, she's so stupid, right?" No, somehow Angel, as disgusting and terrible as she is, ends up being a very likable and interesting character. This novel had me rethinking people I knew who had some of Angel's off-putting characteristics who I generally have just written off as "bad or annoying people."

There is some great humor in this book. A short yet scathing letter from a detractor was a delicious surprise dropped in unexpectedly and not labored over for long, as many of the delights of this book are--"Dear Madam," she read. "Since you can only describe what you write of from your own experiences, we must deduce from this fact that you are nothing but a common whore. Please keep your excesses to yourself and spare yours in disgust, Lover of Literature." Angel gets her "comeuppance" in similar ways here and there throughout the book, but she displays a remarkable resilience that is actually admirable and inspiring. Ultimately, as disgusting as Angel is, to me she was an inspiring character. From the very beginning--if she wants something, she goes after it. Most people would never even dare to have the wishes she had from childhood, let alone actually try for them, let alone succeed.

I know this may seem like weird praise, but one of the things I love about this book is the complete absence of a identifiable voice from the author (Taylor, not Angel). Fun is made of Angel over and over, yet the author does not come across as someone trying to be jolly or cutting--she just gives you information and it speaks for itself. Angel is never described as ugly or disgusting or odious directly. Instead you have people's hair-raising reactions to her (an enraged woman telling Angel to keep her misguided efforts of charity to herself, a reporter choking down spoiled food because he's too scared of Angel to reject it, a poor woman whose dog was killed by Angel's own pet, who Angel has the audacity to heap abuse and threats upon.) Taylor does not have a clear and recognizable voice in this book--but boy do her characters. Angel seems prone to inspiring angry diatribes from others--and they are a delight to read.

I am a shameless bibliophile. I have read many of the "great authors." Charles Dickens, Thomas Hardy, Victor Hugo, Gustave Flaubert, Jane Austen, Margaret Mitchell--I've read them all, and I liked most of them quite a bit. I can't put Taylor up on their level because I simply have not read enough of her work to make that judgement. But I loved this book--I cannot remember the last time a book so delighted me. Granted, being an aspiring writer myself may have played a role in my fascination of reading a book by an author written about an author. But I wish to God there were more books like this being written. Everybody today seems to rely on style or elaborate plots or having a "schtick"--they would do better to just create better characters like the ones you find here. Elizabeth Taylor must have been a very keen observer of human behavior in her life. She has an amazing understanding of it. She understands why people act like they act, why they think the way they think, and why they are the way they are. In a world of hamburgers and hotdogs, this book was like a choice cut of steak, grilled to perfection, served with savory and perfectly complimentary side dishes. There is no fat here to be trimmed off, no excess, no dragging in the middle, no filler.

If you are the kind of person who finds other human beings fascinating and you are capable of recognizing and appreciating subtle or sometimes dark humor, you will likely enjoy this book. I think a lot of the beauty of this book would be completely lost on the "average" reader who relies on more obvious direction from the author on what they're supposed to be thinking. If you enjoy reading about extravagant lifestyles and people who clamber to the highest pinnacle of success, you will get that here, too. If you want to feel like somebody else out there understands you, you will likely feel after reading this that Elizabeth Taylor does. If you just want several hours of very absorbing entertainment to escape from this world we live in, this book may fit the bill for you. I have found reading this book strangely relaxing. It is like a breath of fresh air after hours locked in a room crowded with unwashed people----ahhhhh, it just feels good to read this book.
Anardred
Angel is proof that we do not need to like our protagonist to want to know his or her life and story. Angel is far from likable, but there are few heroines as absorbing. I love this era of 20th century British literature, too. It's been months since i read Angel, and yet i remember the novel more vividly than the crime show i watched on TV last night. A gem of a book.
Vertokini
The novel's heroine is described within as an exotic bloom from a cactus plant: the novel ANGEL itself might be described the same way. Its title heroine grows up spoiled and adored by her shopowning mother and mother's sister; indifferent to their ideas for her future (or indeed to just about anything else), Angel discovers her gift for fantastic fictions translates beautifully into the publishing world, where she becomes a bestselling author of contempibly popular potboilers. Angel accordingly re-invents herself as a glamorous author figure of the Elinor Glyn school, and we follow her through her successes, marriage, eventual popular neglect, and poverty.

ANGEL is a cult favorite among many British novelists, including Hilary Mantel, but is only really transcendent when it allows Angel to strive (at the beginning and the end of her career) against difficult odds. The scene, for example, where she tells off her aunt for planning to make her a ladies' maid is enormously funny and satisfying. But when Angel is rich and successful Taylor seems too invested in scoring points of of her heroine, as if she, too, feared what Angel might do if not kept in her place.
Snowskin
May be agreat nivel, but is not even remotely based on the person, the life, or work of Marie Corelli as the director of the movie claims.
Tiainar
I ground my way through this book. It was monotonous I did not like the main character. The story told over and over how he totally ignored his family, and I felt, sought recognition for himself. I was not entertained, or educated, or even somewhat enthused about this story. Yuk!!!
Nto
I recommend Angel as an enjoyable, easy read. Taylor's dry humor and all-too-familiar characters had me chuckling from start to finish.
Daron
Elizabeth Taylor's Angel is a good read, as other reviewers have noted, hence my 4 stars, but Kindle users should know that the current digital version has not had the OCR errors corrected, and this detracts from the reading experience. To Hachette Digital: It's one thing to deal with typos if you've downloaded some public domain novel off a free site, quite another when you've paid the publisher $9.99 on Amazon for the right to read it. It's disrespectful to both the author and the readers.
Bought for a Birthday Gift and the recipient was delighted!

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