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by Taylor Caldwell

Download A Pillar of Iron fb2, epub

ISBN: 0385053037
Author: Taylor Caldwell
Language: English
Publisher: Doubleday; 1st edition (June 1, 1965)
Pages: 700
Category: Contemporary
Subcategory: Literature
Rating: 4.5
Votes: 707
Size Fb2: 1282 kb
Size ePub: 1333 kb
Size Djvu: 1251 kb
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Home Taylor Caldwell A Pillar of Iron: A Novel of Ancient Rome. A book could be written about each of these personalities alone. His letters to his publisher and dearest friend, Atticus, fill many books in the Vatican Library, and in other great libraries all over the world.

Home Taylor Caldwell A Pillar of Iron: A Novel of Ancient Rome. A Pillar of Iron: A Novel of Ancient Rome, . His life as a politician alone would fill a library, and he has been called the Greatest Lawyer of Them All.

Caldwell was a masterful novelist and, Pillar of Iron is, indeed, a tour de force. She starts with the hour of Cicero’s birth and ends with his assassination, covering a vast amount in between. Cicero was born in 106 . at his family’s estate near Arpinum. This book was published in 1965, and by then Taylor Caldwell was already very much concerned about the direction of politics and life in the USA. She made this concern amply clear in this fictional biography of the great Cicero, at on time required reading for anyone claiming to be educated. In the real world, Cicero's life spanned the key final decades of the decline of the Roman Republic.

Taylor Caldwell" was presumed to be a man, and there was some public stir when the . A Pillar of Iron (1965). No One Hears But Him (1966).

Taylor Caldwell" was presumed to be a man, and there was some public stir when the author was revealed to be a woman. Over the next 43 years, she published 42 more novels, many of them best-sellers. Many of Caldwell's books centered on the idea that a small cabal of rich, powerful men secretly control the world. Dynasty of Death (1938).

Электронная библиотека. Поиск книг Z-Library B–OK. Download books for free. File: EPUB, . 2 MB. 3. The Devil's Advocate.

A Pillar of Iron book. The spirit of ancient Rome in its last days of glory. Taylor Caldwell tried to change that in 1965 with this historical fiction biography. Drawing on speeches and letters of Cicero and contemporaries like Julius Caesar, Caldwell gives a survey of Cicero’s thought as well as his life. It makes for a long story, but worth the effort. A Pillar of Iron joins the genre of historical fiction, based on a Christian world view, such as Quo Vadis and Ben Hur, in the popular in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Every age shouts, ‘We are a new era!’ Yet it is always the same, for man doesn’t change.

This ebook features an illustrated biography of Taylor Caldwell including rare images from the author’s estate.

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A Pillar of Iron: A Novel of Ancient Rome. com User, July 13, 2000. absolutely brilliant - could not put the book down was transported to Roman times recommed to all I know. A Pillar of Iron: A Novel of Ancient Rome. Dynasty of Death: A Novel. Taylor Caldwell, Jess Stearn. The Devil's Advocate: The Epic Novel of One Man's Fight to Save America from Tyranny. Dear and Glorious Physician.

The spirit of ancient Rome in its last days of glory. The hero of the story, the man called "a pillar of iron" is Marcus Tullius Cicero, the lawyer-statesman who tried vainly to save the republic he loved from the forces of tyranny.

It always seems impossible until it is done. The Arm and the Darkness. Unfolding here are the. Similar Free eBooks.

1965: Not 1st Edition - by Taylor Caldwell - 700 pages - A novel about Cicero and the Rome he tried to save.

Comments:

Celen
Taylor Caldwell was born in 1900 and was one of the 20th century’s most acclaimed novelists. She published forty books during her 50 year career. She was a favorite of my mother, but, although her books were certainly available in my high school library, I somehow never chanced to read any of them. When I recently learned that she had written a novel of Cicero, Pillar of Iron, I was eager to read it.
Caldwell was a masterful novelist and, Pillar of Iron is, indeed, a tour de force. She starts with the hour of Cicero’s birth and ends with his assassination, covering a vast amount in between. Cicero was born in 106 B.C. at his family’s estate near Arpinum. His father, also named Marcus Tullius Cicero but referred to in the book as Tullius, was a member of the equestrian class and his mother, Helvia, came from a patrician family. In Rome, Cicero was considered a plebeian and a “new man.”
In Caldwell’s novel, Cicero’s relationships with both Julius Caesar and Lucius Sergius Catalina go back to his childhood. Cicero is enrolled in a school and becomes a friend and confidant of the younger Julius Caesar, already a prodigy. At one point he protects Caesar from the bullying of Catalina. Catalina, whose patrician ancestry is unquestioned, despises Cicero as a Novus Homo. The two are bitter enemies from an early age. While Cicero is fond of Caesar, he has no illusions about his character, integrity, and ambition. While attending the school, Cicero also becomes friends with a Jewish boy named Noe Ben Joel, who influences him Jewish spiritual ways. This fictional character is a major presence throughout the book.
Young Cicero has little interest in military affairs, preferring to leave such concerns to his younger brother Quintus. He becomes apprenticed to Quintus Mucius Scaevola to study law, and soon becomes a rising star in the Roman law courts. Among his most notable successes were his defense of Sextus Rocius on a charge of patricide, and his brilliant prosecution of Gaius Verres, former governor of Sicily on charges of extortion and corruption.
All during this time Cicero interacts sporadically with Caesar, Pompey, Crassus, and Catalina. Caldwell presents these four as the core of a cabal whose purpose and ambition is to completely dominate and rule Rome. Catalina holds great sway with the dregs of the city, and it becomes clear to Caesar, Pompey and Crassus that he has become a madman. Cicero experiences an attack on his life where his attackers attempt to drown him to make his death appear as an accident. Caldwell portrays Caesar as Cicero’s protector thereafter, not from any altruistic motive but because Caesar has use for the honorable and uncorrupt Cicero as a front for his ambitions.
Cicero becomes a politician and rises in the hierarchy of Rome. In 63 B.C. he is elected Consul with the tacit consent of Caesar. Pompey and Crassus, as they fear the mad Catalina more. Catalina forms a conspiracy with a number of senators as well as disparate unruly elements of the Roman population to, according to Cicero, burn Rome, massacre the Senate and take complete power. Cicero exposes the conspiracy and Catalina flees. Several of Catalina’s co-conspirators are arrested and, at Cicero’s urging and with consent of the Senate, are executed. In so doing, Cicero made two very powerful enemies, Publius Clodius Pulcher, and young Marc Anthony, the stepson of one of the executed conspirators. These enmities will make the rest of Cicero’s life difficult.
Caldwell is a writer of great power and eloquence and the work is infinitely absorbing. At the same time, her religious and political agenda are clear and I think detract from the authenticity of the work. She presents Cicero as a sort of “proto-Christian” who maintains theistic beliefs in an “unknown God” and is obsessed with the notion that a “Massias” or savior is soon to come. The fictional Noe Ben Joel is her vehicle for imbuing Cicero with these notions. Cicero was esteemed by early Christians, as was Cato Uticensis whom Dante admits to Heaven despite his suicide. I think Caldwell would desire that Cicero be admitted to Heaven as well. In any case the novel has a decided pro Christian slant that I felt was inappropriate in a work about pre-Christian Rome.
While Caldwell has obviously done a vast amount of research on Ancient Rome, there appears to be some gaps in her knowledge. For example, she has war chariots present at the battle where Catalina and his rag-tag army are destroyed. While the Romans loved their chariot races and triumphant generals rode through the streets in chariots, they never employed them in combat.
Pillar Of Iron is a magnificent novel with much to recommend it, but I suggest it be taken with a pillar of salt.
Liarienen
Read this book as a teenager when it first came out in 1965. Taylor Caldwell was a huge bestselling author at one time and it is now difficult to find her books. This fictionalized account of the life of Cicero is more relevant today than it was in the '60's. The parallels between the Roman Empire and present-day USA are inescapable. It is well-written, dramatic and compelling. You may have forgotten what it was like to read a bestseller that had no foul language, gratuitous sex scenes or cynicism. I recommend that you revisit this classic from the past.
fetish
This book was published in 1965, and by then Taylor Caldwell was already very much concerned about the direction of politics and life in the USA. She made this concern amply clear in this fictional biography of the great Cicero, at on time required reading for anyone claiming to be educated.
In the real world, Cicero's life spanned the key final decades of the decline of the Roman Republic. He sought to stem this decline, and his writings and speeches of this period have been noted by many as relevant to the decline of our republic. This was already the case, after the election of Franklin D. Roosevelt and the introduction of the New Deal, and Caldwell thought that Cicero's warnings were even more apt by the early 1960's. This book is definitely not pc due to Caldwell's views on the masses, and her repetition of Aristotle's view that "Republics decline into democracies and democracies degenerate into despotisms.
This is a long book, and the complex but exciting plot is slowed down by excerpts of Cicero's speeches, as well as by the author's moralizing, and her introduction of a religious leitmotif centering around the expectations of the imminent arrival of the Messiah. Historically, this was true in the Middle East, but this had little impact on events in Rome. All the same, this is a very good book for anyone interested in what happened in and to Rome 2200 years ago, as there is much detailed information and description about life and events there. Indeed, this book is a painless way to learn about the Roman Republic, provided only that one disregards most of what Caldwell wrote about the military of the time. As always, Caldwell's writing is in the form of high literary English, and this is another reason for reading Caldwell's works. I rated this book four stars because the digressions from the main theme; in 500 pages this would have been a five star book in my view.
Hulis
I know this is an older book but it is excellent. About the life of Cicero, the decadence in the Roman empire, and Cicero's attempts to save it. Wonderful research done my Ms. Caldwell. Sometimes this type of reading can get very dull, but there is not a dull page in this book. Quotes from correspondence of the people Cicero lived amoung. I have recommended it to many, who missed it the first time around. Although these incidents happened a long time ago, it is like reading the newspaper about what is happening in our country today.
Brannylv
There is a lot of great research here and if like me, you are curious or interested in Cicero, there is much to recommend in Caldwell's version of history. I couldn't give it more than 4 stars due to the writers style. It dragged and bored me at times but the story made up for that, so I recommend it but sometimes a description made me cringe.
Westened
This is a little hard to get through, I leave it for awhile than come back to it. Lots of big words which I'm enjoying since it's easy to lookup with Kindle. History might be repeating itself now, the book gives a lot to think about. I recommend it because it's very interesting.
Shem
Amazed how this book written in 1965 about Roman politics and society applies today over 2000 years later. Rome was founded as a Republic which fell into a democracy ending as a dictatorship. Excellent book. You could feel the pain of Cicero as his life long efforts to save the Republic failed.

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