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by P G Sarang,Kyle Gabhart,Andre Tost,Tim McAllister,Rahim Adatia,Matjaz Juric,Ted Osborne,Faiz Arni,Jeremiah Lott,Vaidyanathan Nagarajan,Craig A. Berry,Dan O'Connor,John Griffin,Aaron Mulder,Dave Young

Download Professional EJB fb2, epub

ISBN: 1861005083
Author: P G Sarang,Kyle Gabhart,Andre Tost,Tim McAllister,Rahim Adatia,Matjaz Juric,Ted Osborne,Faiz Arni,Jeremiah Lott,Vaidyanathan Nagarajan,Craig A. Berry,Dan O'Connor,John Griffin,Aaron Mulder,Dave Young
Language: English
Publisher: Apress (July 2001)
Pages: 1200
Category: Programming Languages
Subcategory: IT
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 526
Size Fb2: 1533 kb
Size ePub: 1459 kb
Size Djvu: 1792 kb
Other formats: docx mobi doc lrf


Professional EJB will be a good refresher for those making the transition to EJB ., as well as those developers who are new to Sun's powerful component standard and want to get it right in a hurry.

Professional EJB will be a good refresher for those making the transition to EJB . IBM's solution is the main one showcased here. The book ends with Appendices A to G, which all evolve around the deployment of a simple EJB app on various commonly found app servers. Take a look if you are starting out with EJB; otherwise join the Java Pet Store deployathon for more fun. Now you ask me: what's missing from the book?

Professional EJB shows how to develop and deploy EJB applications using both the . and the new . specification. Finally, the book recognizes that one of the most difficult areas of EJB development is the deployment process

Professional EJB shows how to develop and deploy EJB applications using both the . The addition of container-provided services, such as container-managed persistence, and security and transaction management, are covered in detail. Finally, the book recognizes that one of the most difficult areas of EJB development is the deployment process. Thus it demonstrates how to deploy your EJB applications to some of the leading EJB containers including BEA WebLogic, IBM WebSphere and Sybase EAServer.

Find nearly any book by Kyle Gabhart. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. ISBN 9781861004017 (978-1-86100-401-7) Softcover, Apress, 2001. Find signed collectible books: 'Professional Java XML'.

Finally, the book recognizes that one of the most difficult areas of EJB development is the deployment process.

95 �4. 9 Pub Date: July 2001 Pages: 1200 Authors: P G Sarang, Dave Young, Kyle Gabhart, Andre Tost, Tim McAllister, Rahim Adatia, Keyur Shah, Matjaz Juric, Ted Osborne, Larry Kim, Faiz Arni, Jeremiah Lott, Misha Davidson, Vaidyanathan Nagarajan Professional EJB is the first book on the market to show how to. develop and deploy EJB applications using both the .

Dave Thurman, Justin Almquist, Ian Gorton, Adam Wynne, Jack Chatterton P G Sarang. Berry, Dan O’Connor, John Griffin, Aaron Mulder, and Dave Young. Wrox Press Inc, 2001.

Dave Thurman, Justin Almquist, Ian Gorton, Adam Wynne, Jack Chatterton. 2007 Sixth International IEEE Conference on helf (COTS)-Based Software Systems (ICCBSS'07).

1200 pages) by P G Sarang, Kyle Gabhart, Andre Tost, Tim McAllister, Rahim Adatia, Matjaz Juric, Ted Osborne, Faiz Arni, Jeremiah Lott, Vaidyanathan Nagarajan, Craig A. Berry, Dan O'Connor, John Griffin, Aaron Mulder, Dave Young. 654 pages) by Pravin V. Tulachan.

Professional EJB book. Mor. rivia About Professional EJB. atjaz Juric, Ted Osborne, Faiz Arni, Jeremiah Lott, Vaidyanathan Nagarajan, Misha Davidso. ess. Enterprise Java Beans (EJB) is a server-side component architecture and a central part of the J2EE platform.

Professional EJB von P G Sarang, Kyle Gabhart, Andre Tost, Tim McAllister, Rahim Adatia .

Professional EJB von P G Sarang, Kyle Gabhart, Andre Tost, Tim McAllister, Rahim Adatia, Matjaz Juric, Ted Osborne, Faiz Arni, Jeremiah Lott, Vaidyanathan. Mei Rahim Adatia Faiz Arni - AbeBooks. A Short History of Islam by RAHIM, A. ww. iblio. Find A Short History of Islam by RAHIM, A. Faiz Arni (Author of Professional EJB).

James McGovern, Rahim Adatia, Yakov Fain, Jason Gordon, Ethan Henry, Walter Hurst, Ashish Jain, Mark Little, Vaidyanathan Nagarajan, Harshad Oak, Lee Anne Phillips.

Demonstrates the basics of developing web-based enterprise applications using Enterprise JavaBeans (EJB) within the J2EE architecture. Written for experienced Java programmers, the book identifies the advantages of container-managed persistence, and examines four common design patterns for business services applications. Later chapters address how the EJB container handles deployment, runtime services, resource management, and clustering, and how to integrate EJBs with the component object model, CORBA, and wireless applications. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Comments:

Kearanny
DISCLAIMER: I am also a tech reviewer, but trust me my intention is to provide an un-biased review here.
Let me start by sharing a secret: since January I have been eagerly awaiting the arrival of the 2nd Ed. of Ed Roman's hugely popular EJB book. Well, guess what: while Ed's book is going through community review at theServerside.com (I applaud Ed for being the first to do this, although it may or may not have slowed down the publication process), Wrox managed to go a leg up and became the first publisher of an EJB 2.0 book. Judging from the content of the current book, I have good reasons to say that it has raised the bar for the next generation of EJB titles coming out in the 2nd half of this year. Why? For one thing this book is based on the new EJB 2.0 spec and is up-to-date with PFD 2. As if this not enough a selling point by itself, Wrox also threw in a bunch of other high-octane topics, which made the total value proposition very compelling.
Let's now go through the content of the book, should we?
Chapters 1 to 4 mostly target EJB newcomers. Here you find short and sweet code samples for each flavor of EJB 1.1 session and entity beans. The author's emphasis is clearly on the client views and life cycles of these beans. Many state and sequence diagrams are used to help readers to come to a good grip of this critical material. I consider the goal superbly achieved, even though the code could have used some System.out.println calls to demo actually how bean classes are invoked by an EJB container. Well, save that as your homework.
Chapters 5 and 6 cover the new EJB 2.0 entity bean features we all have been waiting for, i.e., local interfaces, container-managed relationships, home methods, and EJB QL, among others. Dan O'Connor was at his best again explaining how the new spec solves some of EJB 1.1's toughest problems, like the need to use coarse-grained beans to cut down the number of remote calls. Experienced EJB developers, start here.
Chapter 7 introduces MDB. Frankly, I would like to see it augmented to include more details on transactional MDB. Well, Tyler Jewell should fill that void in Ed's book.
Chapter 8 deals with EJB environment, an often-confusing topic to many. How do I specify a DataSource in my ejb-jar.xml file? What does "java:comp/env/..." mean and where does it come from? You get the answers here.
Chapters 9 and 10 are about EJB transactions and Security. And let me tell you - read these vital topics here and forget about any other book. The discussion is so much better in breadth and depth than anywhere else. You need an example on a distributed TX? No problem. Want to understand security principals? They have it covered.
Chapter 11 starts a section on EJB design issues by providing some well-thought-out advice. The topics are so timely and relevant, like bean granularity, session vs. entity beans, BMP vs. CMP, which people ask on a daily basis at various EJB forums. EJB architect wanna-be's: read this chapter and start to enjoy what used to be sleepless nights.
Chapter 12 is about EJB Design Patterns. Well, I guess you cannot cover in one chapter what 3 Sun J2EE patterns gurus wrote in an entire book. Go buy "Core J2EE Patterns" instead.
Chapter 13 tries to show how to use UML to design EJB's. Frankly, this topic is yet to be mature and I doubt many people really practice such. It is still food for thought though.
Chapter 14: if you read no other chapter in the book, please do read this one. EJB developers live and die on the performance of the beans they write. Bean-test is probably the best-known EJB testing tool today and this chapter shows you how to use it.
Chapter 15 gives you more stuff like patterns, idioms that you can use to achieve optimal EJB performance and scalability. It also explains how EJB containers optimize callbacks. To be honest, things start to get a little bit repetitive but I had no major complaint.
Chapter 16: if you believe in BMP or writing SQL is in your blood, this is the one for you. You see how the dirty flag is used, and how coarse-grained bean modeling parent-child relational tables are written. This is a very useful chapter about handling traditional RDBMS-based relationships in the EJB 1.1 world.
Chapter 17: if you are a black-belt EJB developer and want to try you hand to become an EJB container writer, read this. If you brain is swollen by now, save this chapter for later.
Chapter 18 tries to put together a real-world J2EE sample application with servlets, JSP's and EJB's. Well, I only know one attempt that may have ended with some sort of a deliverable(the end-result is known as the Java Pet Store). FYI that pet project of someone has gone through 3 revisions and people are still tinkering with it.
Chapters 19 to 21 are about interoperating with EJB from COM, CORBA, and WAP clients. They are good enough to get you started by following the examples step-by-step.
Chapter 22 is about J2EE as Web Services. IBM's solution is the main one showcased here. Stay tuned.
The book ends with Appendices A to G, which all evolve around the deployment of a simple EJB app on various commonly found app servers. Take a look if you are starting out with EJB; otherwise join the Java Pet Store deployathon for more fun.
Now you ask me: what's missing from the book? Well, topics like EJB build and packaging strategy will definitely of interest to many. Discussion on clustering is also sorely missed.
Overall, I am excited about the book. I can imagine Ed Roman et al. and Richard Monson-Haefel working hard to top this one. To me, competition is a healthy thing.
Coirad
This is really one of the most practical books out there in the market. After giving an initial introduction/code examples to basic EJB development, the book slowly progresses to the real stuff like EJB2.0, Design Strategies, UML Modelling, Web Services, Wireless, etc. Each of the topics are thought out and covered well.
One particular area that this book would beat out everyone else is in the examples. Almost all the chapters contain very practical code examples.
This is not one of those EJB books that explains the theory with some simple examples.. it goes much more beyond that.
Programmers are going to love this one.
Dont_Wory
I agree that this book is very good at covering the topics that it sets out in the outline.
This covers the EJBs in great detail - both 1.1 and 2.0. The knowledge of the individual authors definitely does come through - I have not purchased a Wrox title before, but I rather like the idea of multiple authors working on a book - I find the different views and experiences very powerful.
I did find that at times it did gloss over topics - I would have liked more information on the different pieces of the J2EE architecture, but that may have lost the focus of the book I suppose.
All in all, this book has been able to help us considerably in our development - it gives more than just 'theoretical' scenarios and has significantly reduced the learning curve amongst our team.
I never give perfect marks - but this book is definitely one of the better books that I have purchased.
Hasirri
This is one of the best books I've read in a long time. It is extremely detailed, clearly written, and well organized. If you're looking for a brief introduction to EJBs, this is probably not your best choice. But, if you want a thorough coverage of EJBs, this is a great choice. The book even covers EJB 2.0 which is not yet covered in most books.
Tcaruieb
This book does cover EJB2.0 extensively (the review below must be for a different book!). It not only covers the differences between 1.1 and 2.0 but it gives great illustrative examples.
Although I have been working with EJB for sometime, the book covers the topics that I don't have time to play around with - it provides very good coverage of topics such as Local interfaces and their uses, EjbQL, and home methods (finally!)
The only chapters 19-21 are the only ones that do not go into real depth - but they shouldn't since they relate to topics not necessarily meant for this book; however, they give a great examples to start from such as the wireless one.
I definitely recommend this book - I already have to the rest of my team!
Cezel
This was a great book, but EJB changed a lot since then version 2.0. I wish they come up with a new edition for EJB3.1 and above.
Whitebeard
The authors tochs all the topics but hardly in details. They wrote 700+ pages and tried to cover every aspect of Enterprise Java Development: every major Java API, tie-ins/comparisons to CORBA and COM/COM+, EJB etc.
I was disappointed because I was looking for solid direction on architecting Java Enterprise Applications. The book constantly presents what a Java API (or CORBA model, etc.) can do for you. Only in a few instances does it clearly help you weigh the strengths/weaknesses of alternative approaches to solve a problem.
What you are left with is an overload of information but nowhere to "store" the information in your mind.
I picked this up last summer as it was the only book at the time offering coverage of EJB 2.0.
In the tradition of Wrox books, it offers good coverage of the entire EJB API. While some topics weren't covered exhaustively, that is not what these books are for. This book does provide *effective* coverage of almost everything in EJB 2.0. There is also coverage of design, which is a nice addition!
It is GREAT for it's intended purpose. Highly recommended...

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