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by L. P. Harvey

Download Islamic Spain, 1250 to 1500 fb2, epub

ISBN: 0226319601
Author: L. P. Harvey
Language: English
Publisher: University Of Chicago Press (December 15, 1990)
Pages: 386
Category: World
Subcategory: History
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 751
Size Fb2: 1549 kb
Size ePub: 1209 kb
Size Djvu: 1476 kb
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Harvey not only examines the politics of the Nasrids, but also the Islamic communities in the Christian kingdoms of the peninsula.

Harvey not only examines the politics of the Nasrids, but also the Islamic communities in the Christian kingdoms of the peninsula. This innovative approach breaks new ground, enables the reader to appreciate the situation of all Spanish Muslims and is fully vindicated. An absorbing and thoroughly informed narrative. -Peter Linehan, The Observer.

Start by marking Islamic Spain, 1250 to 1500 as Want to Read .

Start by marking Islamic Spain, 1250 to 1500 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Perhaps the distracting chapters could be rearranged as an appendix. While Harvey takes up his story in 1250, it would be wrong to think that al-Andalus was still in its glory by that time. Islamic Spain was at its height under the Umayyad caliphate, from 700 to roughly 1000 . This was followed by more puritanical and primitive rule from the Almoravid and Almohad caliphates, not unlike today's Salafists.

In Professor Harvey's first book, Islamic Spain, 1250 to 1500, he contextualized the culture of the Moriscos by providing a political narrative. That book is now considered a classic. Muslims in Spain, 1500 to 1614 is crafted in such a way as not to allow the reader ever to lose track of the unfolding tragedy, whose final act was the first sustained, government-directed ethnic cleansing of modern times. I believe Muslims in Spain will be even more of a classic than his first book.

Islamic Spain, 1250 to 1500. Harvey not only examines the politics of the Nasrids, but also the Islamic communities in the Christian kingdoms of the peninsula.

Read this book using Google Play Books app on your PC, android, iOS devices

Read this book using Google Play Books app on your PC, android, iOS devices. Download for offline reading, highlight, bookmark or take notes while you read Muslims in Spain, 1500 to 1614. Picking up at the end of his earlier classic study, Islamic Spain, 1250 to 1500- which described the courageous efforts of the followers of Islam to preserve their secular, as well as sacred, culture in late medieval Spain-L. P. Harvey chronicles here the struggles of the Moriscos. These forced converts to Christianity lived clandestinely in the sixteenth century as Muslims, communicating in aljamiado- Spanish written in Arabic characters.

This Best Selling Islamic Spain, 1250 to 1500 Tends to SELL OUT VERY FAST!! if this is a MUST HAVE .

Filed under : Compare, History, Modernity, tags: 1250, 1500, Islamic, Spain. Books related to Islamic Spain, 1250 to 1500. -Richard Hitchcock, Times Higher Education Supplement.

Similar books and articles. LP Harvey, Islamic Spain, 1250 to 1500. The Concept of Woman, Vol. II: The Early Humanist Reformation, 1250–1500. Paulette W. Kidder - 2004 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 78 (1):151-157. 2: The Early Humanist Reformation, 1250-1500.

Religion & Spirituality Books Islamic Books. ISBN13: 9780226319629. Islamic Spain, 1250 to 1500.

Harvey published his book Muslims In Spain, 1500–1614 in 2006, examining Muslims of Spain in the period between Rebellion of the Alpujarras . Menocal, María Rosa (1993). 1250 To 1500 By L. Harvey".

Harvey published his book Muslims In Spain, 1500–1614 in 2006, examining Muslims of Spain in the period between Rebellion of the Alpujarras (1499–1501) and the expulsion of the Moriscos (1609–1614). Herzog, Tamar (2006).

This is a richly detailed account of Muslim life throughout the kingdoms of Spain, from the fall of Seville, which signaled the beginning of the retreat of Islam, to the Christian reconquest."Harvey not only examines the politics of the Nasrids, but also the Islamic communities in the Christian kingdoms of the peninsula. This innovative approach breaks new ground, enables the reader to appreciate the situation of all Spanish Muslims and is fully vindicated. . . . An absorbing and thoroughly informed narrative."—Richard Hitchcock, Times Higher Education Supplement"L. P. Harvey has produced a beautifully written account of an enthralling subject."—Peter Linehan, The Observer

Comments:

Narder
First, the review from Dulles, VA is spot-on correct.
Second, note that this book does not present a complete history of "Islamic Spain" from 711 to 1492 but rather just the last 250 years from 1250 to 1500. If you're looking for material on Cordoba and the zenith of Al-Andalus in the 10th Century, this is not the right volume.
With the exception of the intriguing situation in Navarre, the initial chapters that survey the role of Muslims who continued to live within Christian kingdoms during the period covered by the book can be a bit trying. However, I was intrigued by the discussions of the efforts that were made to acommodate Islamic law within Christian kingdoms.
Once Harvey gets all that out of the way and gets to the story of Granada, the book takes wing. The story of the shifting alliances between and among the various Iberian kingdoms, the influence of North Africa from across Gibraltar, court intrigues, the development of military technology (especially artillery), the Christians gradual destruction of Granadan agriculture, and other factors combine to provide ample material for a rich story covering the 250 years of Granada and its seemingly inevitable downfall. The account of the siege of Malaga alone makes the book worthwhile.
Having recently travelled in modern Andalucia, I have a good sense of where the critical events transpired. I join in the criticism that the book's maps are disappointing. For example, several Nasrid rulers abdicated to "Guadix" but it wasn't until I pulled out my Michelin road map of Andalucia that I was able to locate it at all. Apart from that, I recommend the book.
Ferne
Re-reading this book Harvey provides, & which I had forgotten, a panoramic
view of the final 250 years of Islam in the Iberian peninsula. The
concluding date of 1500 is that of the prohibition of Islam; by 1250
Christian military supremacy had been established, and that is the
approximate date of the rise of the dynasty that was to rule Granada
until its fall.
After a information filled chapter on terminological problems and a
chapter on small autonomous Islamic enclaves (Murcia, Niebla,
Crevillente), six chapters survey the demographic and legal status of
mudéjares in the various Christian kingdoms of what would later be
Spain. There follow ten chapters on the political and diplomatic
history of the kingdom of Granada, elegantly and correctly called a
complicated ballet (pg 160). The panorama is somewhat uneven:
Muslims living in Christian kingdoms, in almost all cases quite small
minorities (ix), ‘sought to have no history’, to live unperceived and
thus unmolested (pg 68). Granada was ‘a lively center of artistic and
literary creativity’ (pg 189), but from the largest mudéjar community,
that of Valencia, ‘rarely do we get more than an ill-spelled receipt for
a brace of chickens’ (pg 119). One important contribution is the
evidence assembled on the use of Castilian among the mudéjares,
who ‘may never have possessed Arabic, even at the beginning of our
period, as their spoken language’ (pg 99). The moriscos thus have clear
roots in the fifteenth century and before. The translation of the Koran
into Spanish, the model for aljamiado literature, is ‘a radical
departure within the history of Islam in general’ (pg 87).
Harvey’s primary emphasis is on Christian-Muslim relations. He
studies how the Muslims saw themselves in relation to their Christian
rulers or neighbors, and how the Christians saw them. While
Christian historians up to the present have always portrayed Granada
as a vassal of Castile, one of Harvey’s most significant innovations
is showing how distorted that view is (pgs 26-30). We follow the
dizzying politics through which the granadinos skillfully played off
competing enemies, and the varying terms on which the Castilians
allowed Granada to exist undisturbed through short and long truces
(at the beginning, in exchange for the peaceful entrega of Jaén). He
also devotes special attention to understanding dissension within both
camps. There has never been a book treating Granada’s diplomacy so
fully: relations not just with Castile and North Africa but also with
Aragon and Navarre are studied. The sources used are exceptionally
broad and thorough, from Aragonese archival materials to Moroccan
legal texts that quote examples from lost Granadine archives. While
there have been a number of histories of Granada, most have had a
pro-Castilian bias, and none has used all the sources Harvey has
assembled.
The story told is a melancholy one, of decline and fall. Granada
fell, Harvey explains, not because of palace intrigues, which have
long figured prominently in Christian literature on the topic (pgs 266-67).
Rather, Granada fell because it was militarily weaker. It could not
match the Castilian armies in size, staying power, or technology
(cannons). Thus, Granada could not avoid being bled by decades of
forced tribute, nor protect its agriculture from devastating raids.
Harvey provides much fascinating information on the steady stream
of fighting Volunteers for the Faith their link with the Christian concept of caballería
andante is well worth investigation. Yet while their psychological
impact was large, their military impact was small. The rulers of North
Africa, themselves weakened, could no longer help. Especially
significant in the fifteenth century was Islamic dissension faced with
Christian solidarity; the alliance of Castile and Aragon through the
marriage of Fernando and Isabel had profound and ominous strategic
implications for Granada. The surprise is not that Granada fell, but
that it held out as long as it did.
If there is a shortcoming in this vital book, it is that more might
have been said about what Islamic Spain represented to both Muslims
and Christians, and how its history has been manipulated for
symbolic purposes. Harvey’s political and diplomatic analysis does
not pause long over Granada’s material, artistic, and intellectual
splendor, its mystique and Sufi foundations (another surprise, pgs 29-31),
and why its fall was taken harder than, say, the fall of Zaragoza.
Indeed, Harvey has provided a good index and bibliography for the curious to
discover and build on what he has set forth. Ex - a more detailed work on the Sufi traditions of Granada,
Vudogal
Despite Franco, despite television, Spain in 2009 is far from a homogenous nation state. The most irreducible difference is language, with Castilian, Galician, and Catalan speakers all conducting daily life and teaching public schools in their separate languages, not to mention the many nearly separate dialects throughout the southern provinces, and the unassimilated non-Indoeuropean Basque! Oddly, however, aside from the Basques, there are not the visible differences in 'racial' types between north and south that most tourists expect. The reason is simple; everyone is everything. Spanish identity is a conglomerate of pre-Roman Iberian, Carthagenian, Greek, Italic, Visigothic, Jew, and Berber, amounting to genes for every color of hair and eyes, every complexion, and every shape of nose in every cranny of the country. Spanish history is a similar mosaic, a twining and vining of elements over time and space that looks much like the filagree on the ceiling of a mosque... or of a monastic chapel in upper Castile, built by mudejar artisans with Gothic blue eyes.

"Mudejar" is a term used to identify Muslims living under Christian rule, but don't rush to suppose that it implies a Moorish ethnicity. You'll have to make subtler distinctions and adjust to the complexities of multi-cultural, religiously pluralistic societies - both Christian and Muslim in governance - if you want to follow L. P. Harvey's dense and detailed history of the Islamic communities in Spain from 1250 to 1500. Those communities were never restricted to Andalucia; there were Muslim populations throughout Christian Spain, and some, even as far north as Pyrenean Navarre, remained semi-autonomous and privileged by law until the final expulsion. Likewise, of course, Mozarabes (Christians under Muslim rule), both Catholic and Arian, lived fairly securely if not quite equally under 'morisco' governance. And of course, there were Jews in all regions and at all economic levels.

I can't say this is an easy book to digest. The scholarship is immense, and much of it is painstakingly specific. For my taste, there's too much about dynastic rivalries and confrontations of leadership... military stuff that I find paradoxically bloodless. But the chapters that describe the legal constraints and protections surrounding the lives of religious minorities, Christian and Muslim, are both fascinating and pertinent to our modern dilemma of absolutist antagonism between the two religious camps. As much as European and American Christians have romanticized and/or forgotten the Islamic history of Spain, assuming that the Reconquest is a final episode, Muslim extremists remember it as an invasion and pillaging of their finest realm. Reading this book carefully, you'll chiefly find that nothing was ever so simple, that neither modern camp has more than a sketchy cartoon in mind.

This is the best book I know on the subject. I'd be delighted to get suggestions, via comments, about more recent studies, or about challenges to Harvey's interpretations.

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