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by Patrick Vinton Kirch

Download The Evolution of the Polynesian Chiefdoms (New Studies in Archaeology) fb2, epub

ISBN: 0521273161
Author: Patrick Vinton Kirch
Language: English
Publisher: Cambridge University Press (July 28, 1989)
Pages: 326
Category: Australia & Oceania
Subcategory: History
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 229
Size Fb2: 1236 kb
Size ePub: 1553 kb
Size Djvu: 1805 kb
Other formats: azw lrf txt docx


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Patrick Vinton Kirch. This is an archaeological perspective on the elaborate system of chiefdoms found in the islands of Polynesia. While the growth and development of complex social and political systems in this region have long interested anthropologists and ethnographers, the islands' rich sources of archaeological data have since been exploited.

by Patrick Vinton Kirch.

Start by marking The Evolution of the Polynesian Chiefdoms as Want to Read . Patrick Vinton Kirch, Director of the Oceanic Archaeology Laboratory, holds the Class of 1954 Professorship in Anthropology at the University of California at Berkeley. Books by Patrick Vinton Kirch.

Start by marking The Evolution of the Polynesian Chiefdoms as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Books by Patrick Vinton Kirch

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Patrick Vinton Kirch is an American archaeologist and Professor . 1984 – The Evolution of the Polynesian Chiefdoms (Cambridge Univ.

Patrick Vinton Kirch is an American archaeologist and Professor Emeritus of Integrative Biology and the Class of 1954 Professor of Anthropology at the University of California, Berkeley. Concurrently, he is Professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Hawai'i Manoa. The former Curator of Oceanic Archaeology in the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology, and director of that museum from 1999 to 2002, he is a member of the Board of Directors of the Bishop Museum.

this book is a major achievement and a magnificent accomplishment.

Kirch, Patrick Vinton 1984 The Evolution of the Polynesian Chiefdoms. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Peebles, Christopher . and Susan M. Kus 1977 Some Archaeological Correlates of Ranked Societies. American Antiquity 42:421–448. CrossRefGoogle Scholar. Renfrew, Colin 1973 Monuments, Mobilisation, and Social Organisation in Neolithic Wessex. In The Explanation of Culture Change: Models in Prehistory, Colin Renfrew, e. pp. 539–558. Renfrew, Colin 1974 Space, Time and Polity. In The Evolution of Social Systems, J. Friedman and .

Recommend this journal.

This is an archaeological perspective on the elaborate system of chiefdoms found in the islands of Polynesia. While the growth and development of complex social and political systems in this region have long interested anthropologists and ethnographers, the islands' rich sources of archaeological data have since been exploited. The author combines this fresh archaeological data with comparative ethnographic and linguistic materials to present an innovative and perceptive account of the processes of culture change in the islands over three millennia. Using comparative ethnography, lexical reconstruction and direct archaeological evidence, the author reconstructs the broad outlines of Ancestral Polynesian Society, from which the diverse societies of the Polynesian region descended. Major processes of cultural change are analysed in detail, including colonization, adaptation to changing environments, development of intensive production and social conflict and competition.

Comments:

Dodo
This book likely won't interest casual readers. It is dense, dry, and contains no anecdotes or witticisms. It is an academic study, through and through, consisting of social science and real research. However, if that's what you're looking for, look no further. This book will explain why pottery is only found at certain archaeological sites, why Hawaii could sustain greater populations than Rapa Nui, and why the Polynesians were willing to undergo such long and dangerous sea voyages in order to establish new homes. Not with stories or myths, but with hard scientific facts presented in easy-to-read tables.

I'm not an archaeologist or an anthropologist - I came to this book because I was geeking out on the subject of Polynesian migration. Paul Theroux actually mentions the book by name in his popular travelogue "The Happy Isles of Oceania" (1992), and I really wanted to learn more. This book was the perfect answer - clear and evidential. As a total amateur, I wasn't familiar with the concepts of primitive agricultural intensification or tribute systems, but both were laid out very clearly by the author. It seems to me that feedback loops inherent in the cycles of tribute and intensification can explain a lot more of human history than just the Polynesian migrations - the rise of the Mongolian and Roman Empires, for example. That's the kind of critical thinking that this hard analysis is capable of inspiring.

This book is generalized, and includes evidence from all the Polynesian archipelagos, but there are specific chapters devoted to case studies in Hawaii, Tonga, and Rapa Nui (Easter Island).
Thorgaginn
Fascinating, not excessively technical. Sort of a condensed version of human history, except the Polynesians generally lost the race between population and technology, whereas for humanity in general the race is still on. Presents (among other things) a very strong hypothesis about the origins of social hierarchy.

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