silviacolasanti.it
» » Upscaling Downtown: Stalled Gentrification in Washington, D.C. (The Anthropology of Contemporary Issues)

Download Upscaling Downtown: Stalled Gentrification in Washington, D.C. (The Anthropology of Contemporary Issues) fb2, epub

by Brett Williams

Download Upscaling Downtown: Stalled Gentrification in Washington, D.C. (The Anthropology of Contemporary Issues) fb2, epub

ISBN: 0801421063
Author: Brett Williams
Language: English
Publisher: Cornell University Press (February 26, 1988)
Pages: 176
Category: Americas
Subcategory: History
Rating: 4.8
Votes: 800
Size Fb2: 1220 kb
Size ePub: 1823 kb
Size Djvu: 1774 kb
Other formats: mbr mobi rtf docx


In Upscaling Downtown, anthropologist Brett Williams provides an. .The brief book's six chapters seek to explore the ethnography of Washington, .

In Upscaling Downtown, anthropologist Brett Williams provides an ethnography of a changing urban neighborhood that she calls Elm Valley. Located in Washington. Upscaling Downtown is a clear, marvelously insightful analysis of the cultural dynamics of gentrification. Karen Bordkin Sacks). s Mt. Pleasant neighborhood during a time of transition in the mid-1980s.

In Upscaling Downtown, anthropologist Brett Williams provides an ethnography of a changing urban neighborhood that she calls "Elm Valley. Located in Washington, .

Series: The Anthropology of Contemporary Issues

Series: The Anthropology of Contemporary Issues. Published by: Cornell University Press. This book explores the complexities of life in a varied urban neighborhood I call Elm Valley. Here a core of longterm black American residents has welcomed many newcomers in the past ten years, including refugees from East Africa, Central America, Southeast Asia, and the Caribbean and, most problematically, prosperous white middle-class property owners. These years of stalled gentrification framed an anomalous time when the most unlikely groups of people tried to live together as neighbors.

In Upscaling Downtown, anthropologist Brett Williams provides an ethnog. Upscaling Downtown: Stalled Gentrification in Washington Dc (Anthropology of Contemporary Issues). 0801494192 (ISBN13: 9780801494192).

Stalled Gentrification in Washington, . In Upscaling Downtown, anthropologist Brett Williams provides an.As a result, Elm Valley experienced several years of stalled gentrification. Series:The Anthropology of Contemporary Issues. Cornell university press. In Upscaling Downtown, anthropologist Brett Williams provides an ethnography of a changing urban neighborhood that she calls "Elm Valley.

Williams, Brett 1988 Upscaling Downtown: Stalled Gentrification in Washington, D. The latter covered a field in which she is less well known but concerned a movement in the anthropology of the 1940s which influenced her and in which she herself took strong positions.

Williams, Brett 1988 Upscaling Downtown: Stalled Gentrification in Washington, DC. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press. References cited Krippner, Stanley, and April Thompson 1996 A 10-Facet Model of Dreaming Applied to Dream Practices of Sixteen Native American Cultural Groups.

Brett Williams Prof Emerita Department of Anthropology . 202) 885-1836 (Office). Bio. Brett Williams began her work as an anthropologist working among migrant farm workers in Illinois, exploring how they coped with terrible poverty and helping them organize a lettuce boycott and raise money for a halfway house.

Gentrification Fundamentals Contemporary gentrification .

Gentrification Fundamentals Contemporary gentrification, which scholars sometimes call state-led, municipally-managed, or revanchist (revengeful), follows broad political and economic shifts in the last quarter of the twentieth century, whereby government actors deregulated existing markets, bankers developed and expanded newer and riskier markets, corporate business people became involved in development, and state government officials put greater emphasis on local tax revenues. Gentrification cannot be explained by economic restructuring alone, however (Ley, 1986).

Upscaling Downtown Stalled Gentrification in Washington, . by Brett Williams and Publisher Cornell University Press. Save up to 80% by choosing the eTextbook option for ISBN: 9781501711626, 1501711628. The print version of this textbook is ISBN: 9780801494192, 0801494192.

Books by Brett Williams. Upscaling Downtown: Stalled Gentrification in Washington, . by Brett Williams (Author).

In Upscaling Downtown, anthropologist Brett Williams provides an ethnography of a changing urban neighborhood that she calls "Elm Valley." Located in Washington, D.C., Elm Valley was one of the first neighborhoods to draw middle-class property owners back to the inner city, but a faltering housing industry halted what might have been the rapid displacement of the poor. As a result, Elm Valley experienced several years of stalled gentrification. It was a period when very unlikely people lived side by side: black families who had migrated to the nation's capital from the Carolinas decades earlier, newly arrived refugees from Central America and Southeast Asia, and more prosperous whites. For Williams, a ten-year resident of Elm Valley, stalled gentrification offered a rare opportunity to observe how people 'with varied cultural traditions and economic resources saw and used the neighborhood in which they lived.

Comments:

Dalarin
Not being an ethnographer, urbanist, or sociologist, I almost hesitate to comment on this book, since it is rooted in those fields. However, since it is written at a level appropriate to a general audience, and concerns my home town, it seems reasonable to do so. The brief book's six chapters seek to explore the ethnography of Washington, D.C.'s Mt. Pleasant neighborhood during a time of transition in the mid-1980s. Williams attempts to disguise her study's location (which was also her home) by calling it "Elm Valley" and using fake street names, but people from D.C. will recognize Mt. P pretty quickly. Williams is a good writer and each individual section reads well, however, the chapters feel quite separate and it is sometimes a bit of a struggle to connect them to any larger thesis.

Chapter 1 briefly discusses the common "myths" of Washington as a city and traces the migration of one extended family from the Carolinas to D.C. Chapter 2 focuses on a particular block and its inhabitants, in an attempt to demonstrate how the prevalence of migrants from the south (such as the family from Chapter 1) has led to a local microculture which mimics those origins, especially in relation to food and gardening, which are treated in some detail. Chapter 3 shifts to another block, where an old apartment building faces a series of row houses. Williams spent a great deal of time talking to inhabitants of both, and is able to paint a fine picture of the dichotomy between them. Renters vs. home-owners, gentrifiers, asians, etc. However this gets a little bogged down in the finer semantic distinctions between "home" and "house", and veers off-course a little into a critique of how the idea of "home" has been culturally sold in post-war America.

Chapter 4 discusses the ethnography of "Main Street" (ie. Mt. Pleasant Street), and is striking in that the issues of twenty years ago remain largely unresolved, and if anything, are only heightened. For example, There are still economic tensions between shopping at local markets and an excursion to suburban supermarkets (although this is changing rapidly as chain stores take root several blocks away) and the issue if people hanging out on the street at all hours remains. However, the "stalled" gentrification has clearly been "unstalled" as every year sees more upscale-oriented businesses dotting the streetscape (such as a coffeehouse called "Dos Gringos", a bar called "Marx Cafe", and a boutique pizzeria).

Chapter 5 focuses on television viewing habits, contrasting the aspirational viewing habits of the poorer renters (who favor "Dallas", "Dynasty" and other such "Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous" viewing) with that of the more affluent homeowners (who favor "Hill Street Blues", "St. Elsewhere", and other such "gritty" representations of big city life). Williams has some nice analysis here, pointing out the obvious problems of the wealthy watching shows which more or less reinforce stereotypes of "city life", and how children of all classes watch the same shows. But this veers off-course again in a mini-rant against how children's programming has become commodified and exists primarily as a marketing vehicle. None of this is untrue, it's just not particularly germane.

The final chapter begins by outlining two grassroots efforts at creating community: a street festival highlighting the cultural traditions of Mt. Pleasant's diverse inhabitants, and a homeowner-led attempt to gain "historic" designation for the neighborhood. Then, in a hasty ten final pages, Williams attempts to pull everything together into a meaningful conclusion. Somewhat unhelpfully, she concludes that "the problems of Elm Valley are inseparable from the problems of militaristic consumer capitalism." To be more precise: "The problem in Elm Valley was that newer residents lent time and resources too rarely and that they too often undertook efforts in their own interest without considering others' sentiments and needs. Middle-class people...did not really know how to root their connections and resources in local life. Despite their rhetoric, they did not really know how to live in an integrated neighborhood." This is rather an interesting conclusion, since throughout the book Williams has treated all perspectives and demographics with respect and clarity (despite somewhat romanticing the 1950s-70s). So it's somewhat surprising to learn at the end that basically it's all the fault of those damn yuppies. Williams does offer some salves, such as the idea that the people of the neighborhood must "democratically invent community" through the "construction of a ritual life" (such as that of festivals or the faux-Carolina of the back alleys), and need to build a "world of routine interactions" in such shared spaces as day-care centers, the thrift store, and the farmer's market. Presumably the idea is that by these kind of regular interactions will foster cross-cultural understanding.This all sounds nice, but is contradictory to Williams' own findings that spaces currently shared by different ethnic and class groups (such as apartment hallways or alleys behind houses), can serve as catalysts for the mistrust and dislike of "the other."

Overall, the book provides strong examples of urban ethnographic fieldwork and writing, while being somewhat weak on context and focus. For example, the analysis in Chapter 2 of how neighbors interact via their backyards and shared alleys is striking. Another example of her keen ear appears in Chapter 3, where she explores the differing perceptions of public space, such as hallways and laundry rooms, between longtime black residents of the apartment building, and newer Latino residents. However, the racial and class issues she delves into lack solid contextual grounding. It would have been nice if she'd been able to mine some census or city data to empirically demonstrate how the neighborhood's demographics have changed over time. And despite the centrality of the housing and rental market to her study, she kind of dances around it, failing to provide any real data on how housing prices have escalated disproportionately to wages in the period she examines. Still, this is a good quick read for anyone with a strong interest in Washington, D.C.'s ethnography, or simply as an example of how to translate painstaking fieldwork into a narrative.

Note: Gabriella Modan's "Turf Wars: Discourse, Diversity, and the Politics of Place" picks up the ethnographic and economic story of Mt. Pleasant almost twenty years later.
Boyn
Not being an ethnographer, urbanist, or sociologist, I almost hesitate to comment on this book, since it is rooted in those fields. However, since it is written at a level appropriate to a general audience, and concerns my home town, it seems reasonable to do so. The brief book's six chapters seek to explore the ethnography of Washington, D.C.'s Mt. Pleasant neighborhood during a time of transition in the mid-1980s. Williams attempts to disguise her study's location (which was also her home) by calling it "Elm Valley" and using fake street names, but people from D.C. will recognize Mt. P pretty quickly. Williams is a good writer and each individual section reads well, however, the chapters feel quite separate and it is sometimes a bit of a struggle to connect them to any larger thesis.

Chapter 1 briefly discusses the common "myths" of Washington as a city and traces the migration of one extended family from the Carolinas to D.C. Chapter 2 focuses on a particular block and its inhabitants, in an attempt to demonstrate how the prevalence of migrants from the south (such as the family from Chapter 1) has led to a local microculture which mimics those origins, especially in relation to food and gardening, which are treated in some detail. Chapter 3 shifts to another block, where an old apartment building faces a series of row houses. Williams spent a great deal of time talking to inhabitants of both, and is able to paint a fine picture of the dichotomy between them. Renters vs. home-owners, gentrifiers, asians, etc. However this gets a little bogged down in the finer semantic distinctions between "home" and "house", and veers off-course a little into a critique of how the idea of "home" has been culturally sold in post-war America.

Chapter 4 discusses the ethnography of "Main Street" (ie. Mt. Pleasant Street), and is striking in that the issues of twenty years ago remain largely unresolved, and if anything, are only heightened. For example, There are still economic tensions between shopping at local markets and an excursion to suburban supermarkets (although this is changing rapidly as chain stores take root several blocks away) and the issue if people hanging out on the street at all hours remains. However, the "stalled" gentrification has clearly been "unstalled" as every year sees more upscale-oriented businesses dotting the streetscape (such as a coffeehouse called "Dos Gringos", a bar called "Marx Cafe", and a boutique pizzeria).

Chapter 5 focuses on television viewing habits, contrasting the aspirational viewing habits of the poorer renters (who favor "Dallas", "Dynasty" and other such "Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous" viewing) with that of the more affluent homeowners (who favor "Hill Street Blues", "St. Elsewhere", and other such "gritty" representations of big city life). Williams has some nice analysis here, pointing out the obvious problems of the wealthy watching shows which more or less reinforce stereotypes of "city life", and how children of all classes watch the same shows. But this veers off-course again in a mini-rant against how children's programming has become commodified and exists primarily as a marketing vehicle. None of this is untrue, it's just not particularly germane.

The final chapter begins by outlining two grassroots efforts at creating community: a street festival highlighting the cultural traditions of Mt. Pleasant's diverse inhabitants, and a homeowner-led attempt to gain "historic" designation for the neighborhood. Then, in a hasty ten final pages, Williams attempts to pull everything together into a meaningful conclusion. Somewhat unhelpfully, she concludes that "the problems of Elm Valley are inseparable from the problems of militaristic consumer capitalism." To be more precise: "The problem in Elm Valley was that newer residents lent time and resources too rarely and that they too often undertook efforts in their own interest without considering others' sentiments and needs. Middle-class people...did not really know how to root their connections and resources in local life. Despite their rhetoric, they did not really know how to live in an integrated neighborhood." This is rather an interesting conclusion, since throughout the book Williams has treated all perspectives and demographics with respect and clarity (despite somewhat romanticing the 1950s-70s). So it's somewhat surprising to learn at the end that basically it's all the fault of those damn yuppies. Williams does offer some salves, such as the idea that the people of the neighborhood must "democratically invent community" through the "construction of a ritual life" (such as that of festivals or the faux-Carolina of the back alleys), and need to build a "world of routine interactions" in such shared spaces as day-care centers, the thrift store, and the farmer's market. Presumably the idea is that by these kind of regular interactions will foster cross-cultural understanding.This all sounds nice, but is contradictory to Williams' own findings that spaces currently shared by different ethnic and class groups (such as apartment hallways or alleys behind houses), can serve as catalysts for the mistrust and dislike of "the other."

Overall, the book provides strong examples of urban ethnographic fieldwork and writing, while being somewhat weak on context and focus. For example, the analysis in Chapter 2 of how neighbors interact via their backyards and shared alleys is striking. Another example of her keen ear appears in Chapter 3, where she explores the differing perceptions of public space, such as hallways and laundry rooms, between longtime black residents of the apartment building, and newer Latino residents. However, the racial and class issues she delves into lack solid contextual grounding. It would have been nice if she'd been able to mine some census or city data to empirically demonstrate how the neighborhood's demographics have changed over time. And despite the centrality of the housing and rental market to her study, she kind of dances around it, failing to provide any real data on how housing prices have escalated disproportionately to wages in the period she examines. Still, this is a good quick read for anyone with a strong interest in Washington, D.C.'s ethnography, or simply as an example of how to translate painstaking fieldwork into a narrative.

Note: Gabriella Modan's "Turf Wars: Discourse, Diversity, and the Politics of Place" picks up the ethnographic and economic story of Mt. Pleasant almost twenty years later.

Related to Upscaling Downtown: Stalled Gentrification in Washington, D.C. (The Anthropology of Contemporary Issues)

Download Green Valley Arizona (Images of America) fb2, epub

Green Valley Arizona (Images of America) fb2 epub

Author: Philip Goorian
Category: Americas
ISBN: 0738520721
Download Ferghana Valley: The Heart of Central Asia (Studies of Central Asia and the Caucasus) fb2, epub

Ferghana Valley: The Heart of Central Asia (Studies of Central Asia and the Caucasus) fb2 epub

Author: S. Frederick Starr
Category: Humanities
ISBN: 0765629992
Download Chicago's Southeast Side (Images of America) fb2, epub

Chicago's Southeast Side (Images of America) fb2 epub

Author: Rod Sellers
Category: Americas
ISBN: 073853403X
Download Haunted Valley and Other Ghost Stories fb2, epub

Haunted Valley and Other Ghost Stories fb2 epub

Author: Mary Williams
Category: Short Stories & Anthologies
ISBN: 0718301161
Download Beyond the Valley (Heart of Green Valley) fb2, epub

Beyond the Valley (Heart of Green Valley) fb2 epub

Author: Meredith Resce
Category: Literature & Fiction
ISBN: 0958552363
Download The St.Croix Valley fb2, epub

The St.Croix Valley fb2 epub

Author: Debra Chial
Category: United States
ISBN: 0896581837
Download Stalled Democracy: Capital, Labor, and the Paradox of State-Sponsored Development fb2, epub

Stalled Democracy: Capital, Labor, and the Paradox of State-Sponsored Development fb2 epub

Author: Eva Bellin
Category: Politics & Government
ISBN: 0801439426