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Download Sons of the Profits Or There's No Business Like Grow Business, The Seattle Story 1851-1901 fb2, epub

by William C Speidel

Download Sons of the Profits Or There's No Business Like Grow Business, The Seattle Story 1851-1901 fb2, epub

ISBN: 091489000X
Author: William C Speidel
Language: English
Publisher: Nettle Creek Publishing Co (1967)
Pages: 345
Category: Americas
Subcategory: History
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 362
Size Fb2: 1500 kb
Size ePub: 1385 kb
Size Djvu: 1765 kb
Other formats: lit lrf lrf mbr


Ships from and sold by Chacharealsmooth. Stepping outside of the seamstress business, she was a woman to make loans, and contributed to many of Seattle's businesses and much of her children's education and she always stopped to save many a Son in the early 1890s after the fire leveled much of the city and panic left many on the verge of ruin.

Sons of the Profits is a book about the founding fathers of Seattle. Interesting look at Seattle's history from 1851-1901. Heavily weighed down by the writing style, seeped in 1960s "folksy charm," dramatic storytelling, and a generous sprinkling of white male-centricism.

Published by Nettle Creek Publishing Co (1624).

The Seattle Story, 1851-1901.

Manufacturer: Nettle Creek Release date: 19 August 1997 ISBN-10 : 0914890069 ISBN-13: 9780914890065. add. Separate tags with commas, spaces are allowed. The Seattle Story, 1851-1901. Please select Production or behind the scenes photos Concept artwork Cover CD/DVD/Media scans Screen capture/Screenshot. Please read image rules before posting.

1851-1901 by William C. Speidel, Seattle Washington, Nettle Creek Publishing Company 1967, printed in 1967. This item is a book6 1/4" by 9 1/2" 345 page hardcover copy. This book is in good condition with some soiling and rubbing of the covers,there is some writing inside the front cover, the first page that is before the title pages has a black mark of aprox , and has some writing on it too, and the edges of the pages have two black marks of aprox , but the rest of the. pages are clean and tight, I have not seen any writing on the pages

Speidel, William C. (1967). Sons of the Profits (There's no business like grow business: the Seattle story, 1851–1901). Seattle: Nettle Creek Publishing Company.

Speidel, William C. pp. 57–80, 256. ISBN 14890-00-X. Speidel provides a substantial biography with extensive primary sources. James R. Warren, "Ten who shaped Seattle: Henry Yesler struck gold in lumber and real estate", Seattle Post-Intelligencer, September 25, 2001. org ("The Online Encyclopedia of Washington State History"), October 7, 1998, revised by Walt Crowley.

Sons of the Profits: There's No Business Like Grow Business. This is one of the best history books that I've read in years. Bill Speidel's witty story telling enhances the already amusing history about the people who founded Seattle. It's nice to read a book that doesn't 'fluff' the truth about people and politics. This a defiantly a MUST READ book!! If you like this book also check out Bill Speidel's book on Doc Maynard.

The Seattle Story, 1851-1901.

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An account of the real people that started and developed this city over its first fifty years.

Comments:

Gold Crown
If you're interested in a true history of Seattle, without the whitewash to make the founding fathers sound like saints, then I think you'll really enjoy this book. I've read it a couple of times, and I send it to friends often.
Mitynarit
Excellent condition and service. Like new. Ordered "Doc Maynard" first and found that this precedes that book and wanted to get the background. Book like new.
Zetadda
It was delivered quickly, cost much less than if bought in Seattle, and exactly as advertised
Oghmaghma
great
Larosa
Consistently funny, informative and entertaining.
Ance
What an informative book as well as a funny book about Seattle.
Hidden Winter
Just as expected.
Corro and I tripped and suffered as tourist hustlees do on our way to the corner of Yesler and 1st. It was in July that we were introduced to Bill Speidel and the disparate underground ruination of Seattle's own Skid Road, to the city's beginnings as a failed township at Alki Pt. run by two of Portland's very own hungry for bigger and brighter things, to the nation-wide political tug-o-war over the UP's northwest expansion and Washington/Tacoma's capitalhood, and to the 1889 fire that gave Seattle the makeover necessary to later bring in the swarms of settlers and fortune seekers foolhardy enough to risk it all in the rush for the wild Klondike dream--the sort of crowd that let Seattle grow into the bustling metropolis of hipsters and crack-addict hobos it is today.

Mill Street & 1st. Pioneer Square, in some ways the historical epicenter of Seattle: The former yard of Seattle's own blood business tycoon Henry Yesler, the location was the first great success for Seattle, the original progenitor for the city's future, and turned Yesler from a 2-cents-to-his-name bum into the city's wealthiest and greediest necessity. It was by this yard that Yesler, with the help of other early Sons of the Profits, built the Sound's first saw mill, which with the booming Californian demand for lumber in the mid 19th century brought enough prosperity to save a town that by all accounts deserved to fail to neighboring rivals in the better-located and more aggressively-funded Tacoma.

Today--no one calls it Mill Street anymore, and no one really calls it Skid Road, either. It's been too many years since lumber or anything other than cars and people was last seen tumbling (or skidding) down that hillacious hill we now know as Yesler Way in honor of that selfish monster we owe so much to--even if all he did in his later years was demand the hanging of criminals on his yard and attempt again and again to sue his own city into bankruptcy and delay the post-fire reconstruction. Yesler's old `front yard' that caused such a ruckus circa 1890 is now Pioneer Square, a quaint little plaza around which today's oldest still-standing Seattlean buildings are located--all of them built after the 1889 Great Seattle Fire--, where Bill Speidel himself, the man sittin' kids like me on his lap for `Back in my day...' after `Back in my day...' stories of the Seattle's earliest years opened shop and fought to preserve the underground remnants of Seattle's burned-up or sunken (and still-sinking) past one whole century after the town's conception, and where one sight really sticks out like a sore thumb to most tourists: A massive totem pole from the northern Kinninook clan. It's a little puzzling why shipmates aboard the City of Seattle swam ashore at Fort Tongass and thought this 60-foot graveyard pole constructed circa 1790 was the perfect fit for Seattle's streets, so perfect in fact that it was worth sawing in two and struggling weakly to paddle on back to the ship figuring no Indian in their right mind would care if Seattle done gone stole'd their history. A little more couldn't hurt.*

Bill Speidel manages to keep this grandfatherly story-telling tone throughout his 50-year Seattle history, and while it doesn't make for the greatest writing in the world, it keeps things entertaining--particularly refreshing for a historical study--, keeps ya turnin' dem pages and chuckling along with his cheap gags and hefty amount of shining personality. My only complaint is: while learning about the importance of the train to Seattle's growth, and just how complex the battle for it with so many other cities in the area was, Speidel devoted much too much space to the dramatic city v. city battle.** It just dragged on and on and then moved on; forget this, there are more important developments elsewhere. What's old Arthur Denny been up to? This is his town, after all, and we haven't heard from him at all yet, have we? Towards the end of his days--towards the end of all the Sons' days--towards the end there, he decided it was up and time he became mayor--this was his town! right? right!--and he would have, too, if it wasn't for those meddling women, with their votes counting in a progressive town such as Seattle! There's only one way to handle such a situation, and that's to Praise the Lord and take away those game-changing votes, delay national women's suffrage another 32 years! Progress! (sneer. wheeze) that's for the wussies in Tacoma.

I wish I could have known a woman like Lou Graham, Seattle's hostess, her Madame. She arrived much like Yesler did, nearly penniless and filled with ambition; and just as quickly she rose to the top of Seattle's ladder, leading her young, busting--or, ohmm, you know what I mean--army of `seamstresses' into the pants of every Seattle Son, and if you ever experience the legacy of Speidel's influence in Seattle, i.e., his Underground Tour--highest recommendations--there are toilets!--, you'd get the impression Graham built the entire city her own self, that she's responsible for the wealth and brilliance of the city as it stands today. The color of that woman! Stepping outside of the seamstress business, she was a woman to make loans, and contributed to many of Seattle's businesses and much of her children's education and she always stopped to save many a Son in the early 1890s after the fire leveled much of the city and panic left many on the verge of ruin. I wish every city had a ballsy cat of a chronicler with Bill Speidel's strong humor. I wanna know it all, baby doll. Seattle, Seattle, sweet Seattle, God, I miss Seattle. There'll be a time...

And when I'm flying into Seattle again I can lean over the lap of my neighbor, camera in hand, clicking away as the stratocumulaic masses pawing over the plane's breadth give way to a fractured landscape littered lovingly with a variance of architecture and citizens, admiring the historical beauty of it all; I can wax eccentric tourguide to my altogether annoyed neighborly audience: "oh! oh! oh! and there's Alki Point, where in 1853 Charlie Terry founded the town of Alki, a word borrowed from the nearby Duwamish Indian tribe meaning `by and by,' as in, `by and by a town will grow'--cute, I know--as the primary rival to Arthur Denny's Seattle, or New York as it was known at the time, named so as to lure in unsuspecting scallywags and men of business looking for the wealth and livelihood associated with the burgeoning evolutionary expanse of Whitman's Paumanok, but don't worry, haw haw haw, the high winds they experienced around the coast, which would have been about...well, let's say about there back in the 19th century, caused it to ultimately fail, leaving Terry to rid himself of the lands to the town doctor-slash-drunk David "Doc" Maynard and move into Denny's settlement, and--oh! yes! over there where you see that golf course and the little thick gathering of woods, that's where the long-since vanished town of Newcastle was once located. Y'see, when Seattle was fighting for control of the railroad (and it was a losing battle, mind you), the rich ore deposits in the Newcastle mine...."

80%

*After an arsonist attack in 1938, Chief-of-All-Women's honorary graveyard totem was replaced by a much less mindblowing replica that still stands today.

**Tacoma proved a nuisance, backed by the wealthy easterner Charles Wright, a guy who hated all things Puget Sound, they seemed to constantly have the edge over Seattle with so much green support and slandering of Seattle's fine name haw haw. Seattle won when after the years started piling up, `n' things were lookin' grim, the citizens threw up their arms and said Eff this, working together under lousy conditions to get themselves the railroad in their own unique way. Suck it, Tacoma. Suck it good.+

+Unfortunately, Tacoma did well regardless. Also unfortunately, the other big contenders, nice towns with bright, hopeful futures like Port Townsend and Walla Walla, were left to rot.

[Written May 2010 for LibraryThing.]

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