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by Paul L. Hedren

Download After Custer: Loss and Transformation in Sioux Country fb2, epub

ISBN: 0806142162
Author: Paul L. Hedren
Language: English
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press; First edition (October 25, 2011)
Pages: 272
Category: Americas
Subcategory: History
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 879
Size Fb2: 1674 kb
Size ePub: 1784 kb
Size Djvu: 1291 kb
Other formats: lrf mobi txt doc


Numerous books have been written regarding General George Armstrong Custer and his 7th Cavalry on the Greasy Grass on June 25th, 1876.

Numerous books have been written regarding General George Armstrong Custer and his 7th Cavalry on the Greasy Grass on June 25th, 1876. Author Paul Hedren has provided us with a look as to what took place following this "Fruitless Victory" which is the name of the photo on the book jacket. It was hardly a time of celebration as the Indians knew their efforts to maintain their independence was on the wane

Between 1876 and 1877, the .

Between 1876 and 1877, the . Army battled Lakota Sioux and Northern.

Paul Hedren, author, After Custer, Sioux, Little Bighorn, MVSC, Missouri Valley Special Collections, Kansas City Public Library, Kansas City. Western historian and award-winning author Paul L. Hedren asked: Was George Custerâs defeat at Little Bighorn the greatest American Indian victory? Or was it the beginning of the end for Sioux country? This event took place on June 3, 2012 at the Central Library. External metadata update. 2019-03-31T20:14:17Z.

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. Fünf Jahre meines Lebens Ein Bericht aus Guantanamo.

Coauthors & Alternates

First Scalp for Custer: The Skirmish at Warbonnet Creek, Nebraska, July 17, 1876. ISBN 9780803272354 (978-0-8032-7235-4) Softcover, Bison Books, 1987. Coauthors & Alternates. Douglas C. McChristian. Learn More at LibraryThing. Paul L Hedren at LibraryThing.

Sioux County is included in the Scottsbluff, NE Micropolitan Statistical Area

Sioux County is included in the Scottsbluff, NE Micropolitan Statistical Area. In the Nebraska license plate system, Sioux County is represented by the prefix 80 (it had the 80th-largest number of vehicles registered in the state when the license plate system was established in 1922). YouTube Encyclopedic. sioux county nebraska drive. Village of Harrison, NE. ✪ After Custer - Loss and Transformation in Sioux County by Paul Hedren. BigRigTravels LIVE! Sioux City, Iowa to Gretna, Nebraska I-29, I-680, I-80-Dec.

Another 140 individuals were wounded.

Historians have analyzed the life of Lieutenant Colonel George Custer and the Battle of the Little Bighorn probably daily since the disaster for the 7th Cavalry back in June 1876. But Paul L. Hedren, a retired National Park Service superintendent, takes a different tack in his new book, studying what happened after the battle. Another 140 individuals were wounded. On the Indian side, Hedren estimates that 162 were killed and 236 wounded.

Discover Book Depository's huge selection of Paul L Hedren books online. Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles. Showing 1 to 28 of 28 results. Fort Laramie and the Great Sioux War. Paul L. Hedren.

Between 1876 and 1877, the U.S. Army battled Lakota Sioux and Northern Cheyenne Indians in a series of vicious conflicts known today as the Great Sioux War. After the defeat of Custer at the Little Big Horn in June 1876, the army responded to its stunning loss by pouring fresh troops and resources into the war effort. In the end, the U.S. Army prevailed, but at a significant cost. In this unique contribution to American western history, Paul L. Hedren examines the war’s effects on the culture, environment, and geography of the northern Great Plains, their Native inhabitants, and the Anglo-American invaders.

As Hedren explains, U.S. military control of the northern plains following the Great Sioux War permitted the Northern Pacific Railroad to extend westward from the Missouri River. The new transcontinental line brought hide hunters who targeted the great northern buffalo herds and ultimately destroyed them. A de-buffaloed prairie lured cattlemen, who in turn spawned their own culture. Through forced surrender of their lands and lifeways, Lakotas and Northern Cheyennes now experienced even more stress and calamity than they had endured during the war itself. The victors, meanwhile, faced a different set of challenges, among them providing security for the railroad crews, hide hunters, and cattlemen.

Hedren is the first scholar to examine the events of 1876–77 and their aftermath as a whole, taking into account relationships among military leaders, the building of forts, and the army’s efforts to memorialize the war and its victims. Woven into his narrative are the voices of those who witnessed such events as the burial of Custer, the laying of railroad track, or the sudden surround of a buffalo herd. Their personal testimonies lend both vibrancy and pathos to this story of irreversible change in Sioux Country.

Comments:

Porgisk
This book provides a good overview of the history of Eastern Montana, Western North and South Dakota, and North Eastern Wyoming between the end of the "Great Sioux War" of 1876-1877 and the Wounded Knee massacre of 1890.

The research is thorough and most of the book is well written except in a few instances, one of which I will highlight below. The topics are very interesting and provide a good review of the history of that period and area. The topics that I found most interesting were the building of the Northern Pacific Railroad and the mass killing of the northern plains buffalo. Other topics on what happened to the Indians after the Great Sioux War and The Beef Bonanza are handled by other books. So, these were nothing new to me but the new reader to this period will probably find them interesting as well.

Regarding the two topics mentioned above - the book describes how the Northern Pacific Railroad was built from early 1880 to the middle of 1883. At one point, the author mentions with some insight that if the Black Hills issue hadn't caused the Great Sioux War, the building of the railroad would have. Also, given this, if not for the depression of 1873, the Great Sioux War would have been fought in that year due to the railroad. This was a very insightful comment.

The killing of 2 million buffalo on the northern plains started shortly after the end of the Great Sioux War and by 1883 most of the buffalo were dead. Reading this and the impact of this event and the placement of the Sioux/Cheyenne on reservations, came across, as it should have, as a great travesty. What a waste of a national resource - I found myself thinking, why couldn't we have had the insight to save many of these buffalo somehow for the Indians? Very sad and certainly not one of the better periods of our history - millions of buffalo killed for their hides and left to rot on the ground when the Indians could have used them to sustain themselves.

There is also an interesting chapter on the development of the Custer Battlefield Monument now known as Little Big Horn National Park. Further, the book mentions the Wounded Knee Battlefield Park and burial site of Sitting Bull which has a nice setting - potential areas for future trips out west for me.

The only negative that I have with the book is that sometimes the writing is difficult to follow, for instance, this sentence at the very beginning of the chapter - "The Buffaloes are Gone" - "In the mid-1870s the tribesman in the Sioux and Northern Cheyenne camps probably never grasped that the buffalo across the plains were not nearly as plentiful as in decades gone by." I found myself having to read this and some other sentences a number of times to decipher what he meant. (In fact, I still struggle with what he meant here given that there were 2 million buffalo at that time and the essence of the chapter - which was that they were all killed within the next 10 years.)

All in all, this is a good book and it is recommended for anyone interested in the history of the Dakotas, Montana and/or Wyoming in the late 19th century. Mostly very readable, thorough and interesting and well researched.
Mohn
Numerous books have been written regarding General George Armstrong Custer and his 7th Cavalry on the Greasy Grass on June 25th, 1876. Author Paul Hedren has provided us with a look as to what took place following this "Fruitless Victory" which is the name of the photo on the book jacket.

It was hardly a time of celebration as the Indians knew their efforts to maintain their independence was on the wane. Changes were to be well under way in regard to their food supply (agriculture to replace the buffalo hunt), their religion (Christianity to replace the Sun Dance), and dress (short hair and white man's clothing as opposed to a loincloth).

The buffalo was to be eliminated through wasteful slaughter. Only the hide, tongue, and hump was to be used while the rest was left to rot on the plains. The building of the Northern Pacific railroad no longer would be stalled in North Dakota, and numerous treaties throughout the years were violated. Sitting Bull would take his Hunkpapa Sioux into Canada, but the Canadian government had their own Native Americans to deal with and didn't want Sitting Bull and his band to use what resources the Canadians had. The author covers the death of Crazy Horse at Fort Robinson in Nebraska along with the death of Sitting Bull at the Standing Rock Reservation which straddled the North and South Dakota border. The massacre at Wounded Knee on December 29, 1890, demonstrated the failure of the Ghost Dance and was the final culmination to the war between the United States army and the plains' Indians. As one Indian was known to say, "The white man made us many promises and they kept but one. They promised to take our land and they did."

You can find much of the information in this book elsewhere as well, but it is still a worthwhile read on this subject.
Felhann
Hedren's latest book on the western plains writes not a detailed book on the post Little Big Horn (LBH) Indian battles, although well referenced, but the transformation of the plains that starts almost immediately after the great concentration of Sioux, Cheyenne and Arapaho break up. With somewhat amazing speed, railroads were being built in these former Indian territories with protection from the army in the field and a proliferation of new forts. The transformation is so abrupt that within a few short years the Sioux and Cheyenne are either struggling to exist in Canada or on reservations. As Hedren describes, the virtual annihilation of the buffalo, aided by the railroad, devastates the buffalo population that once was in the millions almost making them extinct with gross effect on the all plains Indians. One of the last chapters covers in great detail how the tribes were placed on reservations, surrendering reluctantly and others by force such as the Northern Cheyenne who waged a flight to return to their preferred reservation that is very tragic. That chapter also covers the shrinking reservations, through modifications of previous treaties, the ineptitude of zealous and incompetent agents, Indian internal conflicts that led to the death of Spotted Tail, the hysteria brought by the Ghost Dance, death of Sitting Bull and the tragedy of Wounded Knee. The last chapter is a fascinating telling of the numerous and frustrating attempts to properly bury the 7th Calvary dead in and around last stand hill. Hedren is a gifted writer exemplified by the following, "This legacy included the extraordinary ascendancy of the Sioux and their allies at the Little Big Horn in 1876, rallying heroically in a successful defense of a way of life, the downhearted surrenders of 1877 and 1880-81, the fitful adjustments to reservation life in the 1880s, the incessant push for farming, education and Christianity at the expense of traditional ways, and the great land thefts of 1889."
Chuynopana
Excellent

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