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by Nathan H Brandt,Nat Brandt

Download The Town That Started the Civil War fb2, epub

ISBN: 081560243X
Author: Nathan H Brandt,Nat Brandt
Language: English
Publisher: Stan Clark Military Books; 1st edition (May 1, 1990)
Pages: 315
Category: Americas
Subcategory: History
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 336
Size Fb2: 1260 kb
Size ePub: 1620 kb
Size Djvu: 1903 kb
Other formats: mobi lrf doc rtf


Nathan Brandt; Nat Brnadt.

Home, Furniture & Appliances. Nathan Brandt; Nat Brnadt. Product - The Town That Started the Civil War : The True Story of the Community That Stood Up to Slavery-and Changed a Nation Forever.

I have a lot of old books about old stuff. I have the stuff people are trying to figure out now. My old guru whom I got all of this from, had all of this figured out years ago.

The book that started me on this trek was The Town that Started the Civil War by Nat Brandt. Brandt was a newspaper/TV journalist along with his book writing, so his writing style is very reader-friendly. Through this book I learned about the little town (Oberlin, Ohio) and how the Oberlin/Wellington Rescue was connected to John Brown's Harpers Ferry revolt, and the earlier cases of Anthony Burns (runaway slave living in freedom in Boston, but kidnapped by slave catchers) and the Amistad (ship) Slave Revolt.

This situation came to a head with the Oberlin-Wellington Rescue, a pivotal event described in Nat Brandt's book The Town That Started the Civil War. On September 13, 1858, a fugitive named John Price was captured by federal officials and held in neighboring Wellington, Ohio. On September 13, 1858, a fugitive named John Price was captured by federal officials and held in neighboring Wellington, Ohio Oberlin "Rescuers" outside the Cuyahoga County jail. Langston is seventh from right in front row, with hat over his chest.

Home Browse Books Book details, The Town That Started the Civil Wa.

Home Browse Books Book details, The Town That Started the Civil War. The Town That Started the Civil War. By Nat Brandt. Writing under the nom de plume Petroleum V. Nasby early in the second year of the Civil War, humorist David Ross Locke echoed a theory that became widely held, at least in the Western Reserve: "Oberlin commenst this war. Oberlin wuz the prime cause uv all the trubble. A simplistic view, the stuff of which local legend is made.

Before the War Between the States, there was the war between the . Target/Movies, Music & Books/Books/All Book Genres/History Books‎. product description page. The Town That Started the Civil War - by Nat Brandt (Paperback). government and Oberlin, Ohio. A fascinating, gripping narrative. -James M. McPherson, author of Battle Cry of Freedom On a crisp autumn day in Ohio, 1858, two Kentucky slave hunters were closing in on a runaway slave named John Price. Federal law said they had the right to bring the man back across state lines.

Start by marking The Town That Started the Civil War as Want to Read . In this fascinating, spirited telling of one of the most extraordinary confrontations in .

Start by marking The Town That Started the Civil War as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Nat Brandt; Nathan H Brandt. The whole book just seemed like one big quote and a bunch of "and then this happened, and then this happened" - I often only got a few pages in before falling into a deep sleep. Names are thrown at you left and right, there was just no way to keep up with everyone the author mentions - although he nicely adds a list at the beginning of who everyone is, and it's quite the list. James M. McPherson, author of Battle Cry of Freedom.

Predating by a year the Raid of John Brown at Harper's Ferry, Brandt makes the case this was just as likely the place where the Civil War began.

Recounts how the pro-abolitionist people of Oberlin, Ohio rescued a man from slave hunters in 1858 and the subsequent trial of the leaders of the rescuers

Comments:

Funky
Heard about this book during Black history month. Visited a historical site in Columbus, Ohio who mentioned the building was stop on the underground railroad. The curator talked about how the town of Oberlin in Ohio and how it was instrumental in providing refuge for run away slaves.
She spoke of the rescue of an escaped slave, John Price, who had been recaptured. As he was being held in a nearby jail, the "entire" town of Oberlin came to his aid. This fascinating story is told by Nate Brandt in this book. The book itself is written at the college level and is well researched and documented. It is a great insight to the interactions between the north and the south and the prevailing thoughts about slavery, both for and against, in the pivotal time before the Civil War.
Quemal
I just recommended this book for the umpteenth time to someone interested in antebellum history, and then went and read my copy AGAIN.

I got my MA in History. My "specialty" area is pre-American Revolution, up to the Civil War. My thesis was on the contributions of lesser-known, wealthy men of faith in support of ending slavery. They felt "guilty" for their wealth and felt that God's *Higher Law* superseded man's law and did what they could to assist more militant abolitionists without getting caught.

The book that started me on this trek was The Town that Started the Civil War by Nat Brandt. Brandt was a newspaper/TV journalist along with his book writing, so his writing style is very reader-friendly. Through this book I learned about the little town (Oberlin, Ohio) and how the Oberlin/Wellington Rescue was connected to John Brown's Harpers Ferry revolt, and the earlier cases of Anthony Burns (runaway slave living in freedom in Boston, but kidnapped by slave catchers) and the Amistad (ship) Slave Revolt. All of these events are connected through the finances of this small group of men.

All of those connections are what intrigued me and led to my thesis topic, and led me to fall in love with Oberlin.

In my research - then, now, and in the future - I am always intrigued by the little stories behind the big story. This is one of those stories.
Xisyaco
Anyone who is interested in antebellum history will enjoy this book. It provides a fascinating side story to events that led up to the Civil War. Additionally, I enjoyed the well-researched look at the early days of Oberlin College.
Initially, I bought the book to use as research for a novel and ended up reading it cover to cover. Well written and entertaining.
Burisi
I read it years ago and decided to read it again (from the library) recently after starting a Facebook page about old Oberlin. Bought this copy for my son and he says it's pretty interesting.
Whitecaster
This book brings to vivid life the underground railroad and the politics of a nation poised on the brink of civil war. Slave catchers lurk around the edges of communities, hunting for escaped slaves or free blacks that they can kidnap. Radical abolitionists were militant about blocking any such kidnappers from reaching the south (regardless of the legality of the act). This book tells the true story of an escaped slave who is captured and then freed by a large group of Oberlin and Wellington abolitionists. This leads to a trial which made sensational national headlines and crystallized the growing crisis between north and south. It is absolutely gripping.
sergant
Excellent historical research presented as a gripping story.
Fenrikasa
Reading this book changed the direction in which my recently finished novel went! My historical novel, A Small War in Paradise, grew and improved because of what Mr. Brandt so skillfully explained. Not only educational, but inspiring and an exciting read. Kudos.
I must admit I was certainly dissatisfied with this book. Any one who has done their research properly should know that the author left out the real star of Oberlin. John Todd ,who was a minister in Tabor Iowa and a key factor in the transportation of slaves north from Missouri and bleeding Kansas. John Brown stopped to rest and regenerate in Tabor many times.John Todd also stored the guns that John Brown used in his Harper's ferry raid in the basement of his house. In truth the congregation at Tabor lit the fuse that was John Brown that set off the powder keg of the slavery question that started the civil war. How anyone can mention Oberlin college and not mention Jon Todd is a mystery.

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