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Download The Way of the Fox: American Strategy in The War for America, 1775-1783 (Contributions in American History) fb2, epub

by David Richard Palmer

Download The Way of the Fox: American Strategy in The War for America, 1775-1783 (Contributions in American History) fb2, epub

ISBN: 0837175313
Author: David Richard Palmer
Language: English
Publisher: Praeger (February 20, 1975)
Pages: 229
Category: Americas
Subcategory: History
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 767
Size Fb2: 1178 kb
Size ePub: 1633 kb
Size Djvu: 1441 kb
Other formats: lit doc txt mbr


Series: Contributions in American History (Book 8). Hardcover: 229 pages. Publisher: Praeger (February 20, 1975). Here, Palmer neatly divides the war into four phases: (1) April 1775 to June 1776, when the Americans could attack without fear and had nothing to lose; (2) July 1776 to December 1777, the period when George Washington could not afford to risk his outnumbered Continental Army in pitched battle with the British; (3) January 1778 to October 1781, after the French intervened.

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Dave Richard Palmer (born May 31, 1934) is a retired United States Army Lieutenant General, former . River and the Rock: The History of Fortress West Point 1775-1783. The Way of the Fox; American Strategy in the War for America, 1775-1783 (Greenwood Press, 1975).

Dave Richard Palmer (born May 31, 1934) is a retired United States Army Lieutenant General, former Superintendent of the United States Military Academy at West Point(1986–1991), military historian and author, and former President of Walden University. Summons of Trumpet: US-Vietnam in Perspective (Presidio Press, 1978).

Dave Richard Palmer (born May 31, 1934) is a retired United States Army Lieutenant General, former .

Dave Richard Palmer (born May 31, 1934) is a retired United States Army Lieutenant General, former Superintendent of the West Point (1986–1991), military historian and author, and former President of Walden University. A 1956 graduate of West Point, he served two tours in the Vietnam War and numerous command positions during the height of the Cold War. YouTube Encyclopedic.

Book in the Contributions in Military History Series). Book by Palmer, Dave Richard. Select Format: Hardcover. ISBN13:9780837175317. Release Date:February 1975.

Dave Richard Palmer, American military officer, academic administrator. Decorated Legion of Merit (3); Bronze Star (2), Distinguished Service Medal(2); named Distinguished Graduate, United States Military Academy, 2005, Outstanding Alumnus Army War College, 2007. Board directors Walden University, 1992-2001. March 31, 1934 (age 56). Ada, Pontotoc County, United States of America. He was commissioned a second lieutenant in the armor branch and embarked on a military career that spanned the Cold War era.

History: Unit . HistorySage. 1. Analyze how the American colonies developed a sense of identity and unity in the decades prior to the American Revolution. com The American Revolution: 1775-1783 I. Second Continental Congress, May 10, 1775 Use space below for A. All 13 colonies were present notes  Delegates were still not interested in independence but rather the redress of colonial grievances (this was a relatively conservative position at the time). 2. Analyze the political and economic causes for the American colonies’ resistance to British imperial rule between 1763 and 1775.

The Way of the Fox: American Strategy in the War for America. November 1975 · The Journal of Southern History

The Way of the Fox: American Strategy in the War for America. November 1975 · The Journal of Southern History. This book examines the lives and contributions of American women physicists who were active in the years following World War II, during the middle decades of the 20th century. It covers the strategies they used to survive and thrive in a time where their gender was against them. The percentage of woman taking PhDs in physics has risen from 6% in 1983 to 20% in 2012 (an all-time high for women). By understanding the history of women in physics, these gains can continue.

The American Revolutonary War, or War of American Independence as they prefer to call it, has never appealed strongly to. .Readers should not come to The War for America with misplaced expectations. It is not the rousing battle narrative that makes up s.

The American Revolutonary War, or War of American Independence as they prefer to call it, has never appealed strongly to British historians and their readers except insofar as it could be used to prove how wrong King George III had been to reject enlightened Whig leadership in his government, and instead to try to rule through royal prerogative.

Book by Palmer, Dave Richard

Comments:

Aurizar
Has history shortchanged General George Washington, the strategist? Dave Richard Palmer thinks so. "Historians have talked around rather than to the subject.... Washington's generalship and the war's strategic framework are inextricably spliced together.... It was he who executed it and, in most instances, planned it. It is he, therefore, who should receive credit or criticism" (p. xviii; 76).
The historiography of the Revolution offers a wide range of opinions regarding American strategy in the war and the role of Washington as strategist. Depending on which author you read, claims Palmer, Washington was "bold or cautious, brilliant or bumbling, judicious or just plain lucky" (p. xix). This debate provides the impetus for Way of the Fox. Palmer believes the issue is much more complex than the existing literature would have us believe; likewise, Washington possessed a much greater strategic acumen than history has credited him with.
Palmer dedicates part I to exploring the "various ingredients of strategy as they acted to shape the conduct of the Revolutionary War" (p. xix). Part II chronicles the actual planning and execution of American military strategy during the war. Although a sound approach, I have a problem with Palmer's execution: he gives equal weight to both parts of the book.
Part I begins with a general discussion of eighteenth century military strategy and tactics and ends with a specific description of the situation in North America in 1775. Although Palmer is a good writer, he offers six chapters of deep prose where one chapter would have sufficed. His description and analysis of the opposing sides in the American Revolution, particularly that of the English, is the only passage truly germane to part II.
Palmer's description of the British high command is on the mark. London fielded an incompetent war team that deserves much of the blame for the outcome of the war. Palmer correctly indicts the most culpable subjects: King George III, Prime Minister Sir Frederick North, and Secretary of State for Colonies Lord George Germain. Of the three, none "stands charged at the bar of history for possession of any unusual degree of wisdom" (p. 34). Palmer profiles Lord Germain, the central point for strategic direction, as an "ex-army officer convicted by a court-martial of malfeasance in the face of the enemy during the Battle of Minden in 1759" (pp. 35-36).
Part I closes with an assertion and a question. First, Washington could not have achieved either of his goals by pursuing a patently defensive strategy. America went to war with England because it sought territorial aggrandizement and independence. Both goals required aggressive action by Washington. However, Palmer asks, did America emerge free and enlarged because of or in spite of the strategy it pursued?
Part II is the meat of Way of the Fox. Here, Palmer neatly divides the war into four phases: (1) April 1775 to June 1776, when the Americans could attack without fear and had nothing to lose; (2) July 1776 to December 1777, the period when George Washington could not afford to risk his outnumbered Continental Army in pitched battle with the British; (3) January 1778 to October 1781, after the French intervened and provided a legitimacy to the American cause while also counterbalancing the Royal Navy; and (4) November 1781 to December 1783, the negotiation period when the Americans struggled to "win the peace." According to Palmer, General Washington consciously recognized each phase and adopted his strategy accordingly: "In the first period which called for audacity, he was audacious; when the second cried caution, he turned cautious; as decisive victory became feasible, he thirsted for a decision; when events after Yorktown required steadfastness, he became the nation's solid anchor [p. 202]."
General Palmer is a soldier and a scholar. He taught military history at West Point and among his other books focusing on military strategy, he is most famous for his work on the Vietnam War: Summons of the Trumpet (1978).
So, how does Way of the Fox grade out? Palmer presents some valid arguments. Yes, the vast literature of the war generally overlooks Washington's performance as America's principal strategist. General Washington is generally portrayed as a figurehead--an amateur who, with more inspiration and luck than skill, preserved the Continental Army and outlasted the British. Way of the Fox corrects this oversight while showing that yes, "even before the word [strategy] was coined, George Washington had become this nation's preeminent strategist" (p. 204). Although Palmer over generalizes and often lacks the in-depth analysis to carry his arguments to completion, Way of the Fox still passes scholarly inspection. In sum, as the only single-volume work devoted to American military strategy, Palmer's book deserves a space next to Don Higginbotham's War of American Independence (1971) in the war literature of the American Revolution.
Tisicai
An excellent review of the American campaigns and strategy in the Revolution. The author coherently demonstrates, from beginning to end, how various social, political, and military pressures on General Washington influenced strategy. At the same time the author does an excellent job illuminating Washington's hand guiding strategy.

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