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Download Incognito: The Hidden Life of the Brain fb2, epub

by David Eagleman

Download Incognito: The Hidden Life of the Brain fb2, epub

ISBN: 1847679382
Author: David Eagleman
Language: English
Publisher: Canongate Books; Main edition (April 1, 2011)
Pages: 290
Category: Psychology & Counseling
Subcategory: Health
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 261
Size Fb2: 1629 kb
Size ePub: 1949 kb
Size Djvu: 1594 kb
Other formats: lrf rtf doc docx


It is full of dazzling ideas, as it is chockablock with facts and instances.

It is full of dazzling ideas, as it is chockablock with facts and instances. The New York Observer Eagleman engagingly sums up recent discoveries about the unconscious processes that dominate our mental life. is the kind of guy who really does make being a neuroscientist look like fun. -The New York Times Although Incognito is fast-paced, mind-bending stuff, it’s a book for regular folks.

Incognito : the secret lives of the brain, David Eagleman. p. cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. Take a close look at yourself in the mirror. Beneath your dashing good looks churns a hidden universe of networked machinery. The machinery includes a sophisticated scaffolding of interlocking bones, a netting of sinewy muscles, a good deal of specialized fluid, and a collaboration of internal organs chugging away in darkness to keep you alive. A sheet of high-tech self-healing sensory material that we call skin seamlessly covers your machinery in a pleasing package.

Neuroscientist David Eagleman plumbs the depths of the subconscious brain to illuminate surprising questions: Why can your foot jump halfway to the brake pedal before you become consciously aware of danger ahead?

Neuroscientist David Eagleman plumbs the depths of the subconscious brain to illuminate surprising questions: Why can your foot jump halfway to the brake pedal before you become consciously aware of danger ahead? Why do strippers make more money at certain times of month, even while no one is consciously aware of their fertility level? Is there a true Mel Gibson? What do Odysseus and the subprime mortgage meltdown have in common? How is your brain like a conflicted democracy engaged in civil war? Why are people whose name begins with J more likely to marry other people whose name begins with . .

Incognito: The Secret Lives of the Brain is a New York Times bestselling non-fiction book by American neuroscientist David Eagleman, an adjunct professor at Stanford University. If the conscious mind - the part you consider to be you - is just the tip of the iceberg, what is the rest doing?" This is the main question throughout the entirety of the book.

and confabulation in brain-injured patients. They also look into the activity and role of brain systems

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When it meddles in details it doesn't understand, the operation runs less effectively. Incognito – The Secret Lives of the Brain David Eagleman, The Text Publishing Company Melbourne, 2011 ww. agleman.

The enhanced eBook of David Eagleman's INCOGNITO includes the full text of the book plus 8 videos in which the .

The ideas in Eagleman's book are well-articulated and entertaining, elucidated with the intelligent, casual tone of an enthusiastic university lecturer. -The New York Observer. The ideas in Eagleman's book are well-articulated and entertaining, elucidated with the intelligent, casual tone of an enthusiastic university lecturer.

David Eagleman's previous book, Sum: Forty Tales from the Afterlives, was a delightful collection of short fables, each offering a wish-fulfillment image of life after death in which the wish turns out to contain its own perverse consequences. The fable principle was grounded in a nicely ironic psychology, subtly underpinned by Eagleman's own profession, neuroscience. Using fiction, Eagleman found a neat way of revealing how the mind cannot escape the contradictions of its underlying construction.

In this sparkling and provocative new book, renowned neuroscientist David Eagleman navigates the depths of the subconscious brain to illuminate surprising mysteries: Why can your foot move halfway to the brake pedal before you become consciously aware of danger ahead? Why do you notice when your name is mentioned in a conversation that you didn't think you were listening to? What do Ulysses and the credit crunch have in common? Why did Thomas Edison electrocute an elephant in 1916? Why are people whose name begins with J more likely to marry other people whose name begins with J? Why is it so difficult to keep a secret? And how is it possible to get angry at yourself ? who, exactly, is mad at whom? Taking in brain damage, plane spotting, dating, drugs, beauty, infidelity, synaesthesia, criminal law, artificial intelligence and visual illusions, Incognito is a thrilling subsurface exploration of the mind and all its contradictions.

Comments:

Little Devil
I was that annoying kid in high school math who would raise his hand with an answer before the teacher had finished asking the question. My strategy was simple. During the question, if I was comfortable that I knew the answer, the hand would go up. I knew I had a few seconds before I was called on, and the odds of being called on were low -- unless no one else raised their hand. A bit after I felt comfortable that I knew the answer, it would become available for me to open my mouth and say it. I was normally right, and usually would then be asked how I had reached that answer. This was always the hardest part, and I struggled internally to deduce how this could have happened. Such an explanation was usually right too.

In high school math, I knew something I did not quite understand until reading this book, and did not verbalize until writing this review: that we can know before we can say, that our reasoning can be at first non-conscious, and then, with effort, be piped up to our feeble consciousness, as if it had taken place there.

We give great credit to our consciousness, very little credit to our brains. It should be the other way around. As it turns out, our conscious experience is a small, dim fragment of our actual experience. When a perception finally reaches our consciousness, it has been washed clean of noise, twisted according to our expectations and prejudices, and packaged into something more familiar. Most everything that happens in that brain never reaches the surface of awareness.

If you think your brain is a second class citizen, and your consciousness is driving things, then read Incognito: The Secret Lives of the Brain, by David Eagleman. Turns out that much of the action is below consciousness. You know this from your reactions to brake in a dangerous situation before you are fully aware of the danger, or to pull your hand from the stove before you become aware of the pain. The decision-making process of the unconscious brain is not always revealed to our consciousness. In one study, men rated some women as more attractive than others from photographs, but couldn't explain why. Turns out, the pupils of the more attractive women had been artificially dilated with Photoshop. The unconscious brain knows that dilated pupils are an indicator of sexual arousal.

You must read Eagleman's book. When you are finished, you will marvel even more at what the hundreds of billions of neurons in your head can do, understand yourself a bit better, and maybe even understand that your "self" is just a constructed reality.
Meztisho
I liked this a lot. Pretty clear that we are finally getting a handle on our brains really work.
It's a contest in there!
And WE are not really in charge of it.

Now, if someone could just give me a way to "paternalistically" update the brains of those around me so they are not so STUPID, we might have something worthwhile. Just kidding. If you read in this literature, we ALL think we are right and they are wrong - no matter what the topic.
Zainn
A review of Incognito: the secret lives of the brain (2011) by David Eagleman

David Eagleman is a neuroscientist with expertise in genetics, evolution, animal behavior, philosophy, and criminal justice. He has a studied eye to the future and how his discipline may inform our sense of self, of justice, and free will. The book disposes of any notion of what we see and hear being an accurate representation of the physical world, the possibility of our objectivity, and blame as a fair basis for sentencing. As a consummate scientist he rejects reductionism in favor of the emergent qualities of the aggregate of simpler systems. Neurons, hormones, and transmitters, will never explain consciousness. Most of what we do is programmed by genes working neural systems that never arise to the level of consciousness. These systems have overlapping and competitive functions that get resolved by trial and error. Occasionally, especially at the learning stage, consciousness may have to intervene in the conflict of rival functions--as when we are learning to ride a bike or field a fly ball. But eventually these behaviors become totally removed from the thinking process. He does not over emphasis inheritance at the expense of the importance of the interaction of genes with experience and environment. Eagleman theorizes that consciousness arises as a function of the number of inborn options we have available to resolve behavioral problems--humans having the most options and so the most consciousness. I loved the book because of its breath and originality.

Jerry Woolpy
Ger
Eagleman fills this book with page after page of neuroscientific information couched in terms even I could understand. His theme is that so many of the functions of daily life and even of our senses are not apparent or even known by our conscious self. We are a product of our chemistry. Our moods, abilities, etc. can all be traced back to areas of the brain that may or may not have been damaged. I confess I was getting depressed about half way through when I realized that my ego needed to let go of the idea that it was the central entity in my brain. Indeed, Eagleman says that just as Copernicus and Galileo ended our solar-sentric universe, and later scientists ended our earth-centric universe, neuroscience ends our ego-centric universe. I highly recommend this book. It's readable and the footnotes are so worthwhile that I would "read ahead" in the footnotes to see what was coming. As a "dabbler" in science and nature, I had no problem understanding the concepts. However, you scientific sorts out there may have some quibbles that I am unaware of. But then again, apparently there are a lot of things I am unaware of.
Dukinos
There are some interesting ideas in this book. He introduces a paradigm where the brain is analogous to a democracy as many different inputs weigh in on decisions. Some of what he says about perception is new, but if you read about neuroscience somewhat often, a lot of it will be review. He spends some time exploring criminal justice. It's not the best part of the book. He's right that most courts operate as if free will is a thing while most scientists see free will as an illusion. But his suggestions for reform are pretty unrealistic. Also, I've seen others make the same point better. If you get the Kindle version, you might be surprised by how short the book is because when your Kindle says 68%, you'll be done with book (except for footnotes).

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