silviacolasanti.it
» » Alcestis

Download Alcestis fb2, epub

by Katharine Beutner

Download Alcestis fb2, epub

ISBN: 1569476179
Author: Katharine Beutner
Language: English
Publisher: Soho Press (February 1, 2010)
Pages: 304
Category: Fantasy
Subcategory: Fantasy
Rating: 4.8
Votes: 631
Size Fb2: 1556 kb
Size ePub: 1434 kb
Size Djvu: 1663 kb
Other formats: lit rtf lrf lrf


See a Problem? We’d love your help. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. by. Katharine Beutner (Goodreads Author).

Katharine Beutner’s Alcestis lends divine breath and flesh to that ancient shade of myth, the lonely and brave queen who gave her life to Hades in exchange for her husband’s. Alcestis is a novel about sacrifice, renunciation, and loss - also the persistence of desire and the vitality of love. Everyday life in the ancient world, a no-escape-clause afterlife in the underworld, vulnerable mortals, and passionate and tormented gods - all are imagined with intense actuality in a novel that is as intoxicating and hypnotic as the sacred smoke inhaled by the oracles

Katharine Buetner’s Alcestis is a far more willful heroine, and her encounters with the gods of the underworld resonate with a genuine sense of the numinous . Katharine Beutner grew up in Lancaster, Pennsylvania

Katharine Buetner’s Alcestis is a far more willful heroine, and her encounters with the gods of the underworld resonate with a genuine sense of the numinous. Jacqueline Carey, Namaah’s Kiss and Kushiel’s Dart Beutner renders her multilayered heroine with beauty and delicacy, and concerns herself with no less than the intricacies of the soul. Katharine Beutner grew up in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. She earned a BA in classical studies from Smith College in 2003 and an MA in creative writing from the University of Texas at Austin, where she is currently a PhD student in eighteenth-century British literature.

I lay with my hands flat over my eyes, slivers of gray light sliding between my knuckles idn’t know as many of the m. .

I lay with my hands flat over my eyes, slivers of gray light sliding between my knuckles idn’t know as many of the mourned dead as I thought-surely I couldn’t know so many. The calling of names slowed, then ceased, one last wail dying in the still atmosphere: Larisa, cried some woman, some sister or mother or lover

Read Alcestis, by Katharine Beutner online on Bookmate – n engaging, subversive reimagining of the tale of the . In Greek mythology, Alcestis is known as the good wife; she loved her husband so much that she died and went to the underworld in his place

Read Alcestis, by Katharine Beutner online on Bookmate – n engaging, subversive reimagining of the tale of the eponymous Greek heroine who is upheld as a shining example of the dutiful wife (J. In Greek mythology, Alcestis is known as the good wife; she loved her husband so much that she died and went to the underworld in his place. This compelling new take on the classic story gives voice to the woman behind the ideal: What were her true motivations? And what happened to Alcestis in the three days she spent in the afterlife? Historical Fantasy Sci-fi & Fantasy Fiction. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate. How do I upload a book?

In Greek myth, Alcestis is known as the ideal wife; she loved her husband so much that she died and went to the underworld in his place.

In Greek myth, Alcestis is known as the ideal wife; she loved her husband so much that she died and went to the underworld in his place. In Greek mythology, Alcestis is known as the good wife - she loved her husband so much that she died to save his life and was sent to the underworld in his place

n engaging, subversive reimagining of the tale of the eponymous Greek heroine who is upheld as a shining example of the dutiful wife (Jacqueline Carey). This compelling new take on the classic story gives voice to the woman behind the ideal: What were her true motivations?

Alcestis, Katharine Beutner. p. cm. ISBN 978-1-56947-617-8. 1. Alcestis (Greek mythology)-Fiction. I could not have written this novel without the tremendous love and support of my parents, Edward Beutner and Betsy Beyer.

Alcestis, Katharine Beutner. 2. Mythology, Greek- Fiction. My father lost his battle with cancer before this book went to print, but neither it nor I would be the same without the benefit of his love (or of his red pen). My mother continues to be my great friend and greater inspiration.

Katharine Beutner grew up in Lancaster, Pennsylvania.

A curious book, beautifully written with elegant prose and a very vivid visual sense of the scenes being described, which nevertheless feels rather empty at times. There was much I liked about it: the. Библиографические данные.

In Greek myth, Alcestis is known as the ideal wife; she loved her husband so much that she died and went to the underworld in his place. In this vividly-imagined debut, Katharine Beutner gives voice to the woman behind the ideal and reveals the part of the story that’s never been told: What happened to Alcestis in the three days she spent in the underworld?From the Trade Paperback edition.

Comments:

Aria
I love me my Greek myths. Persephone's abduction is explanation for seasons? Yes please. Athena punishes master weaver Arachne by turning her into a spyder who's cursed to "weave" forever? Outstanding.
When I cam across Alcestis, an entire novel centered around a Greek myth, I thought, "yahtzee!" And to be fair, for the first half of the book, the author delivers: mortals co-existing with gods, gods manipulating mortals' lives, etc. However, about halfway through the book things start to get really trippy. To be fair, any Greek myth is obviously laced with magical realism and imagination benders but in the case of Beutner's Alcestis, it is flat out bizarre. For about 100 pages Alcestis is just wandering around the underworld playing a sexual hide and go-seek with the gods and making non-sensical conversation with ghosts. It's like the author discovered hallucinogenic drugs in the midst of writing and decided the novel should double as a visions journal.
Perhaps my expectations for the book were a little exaggerated but when all was said and done Alcestis was less than divine.
Amerikan_Volga
Slow to start, but it picked up very quickly. I love how the theme of grief plays out. I love how the story explores the ability of women to tell their own stories, and how it explores the sexuality of the characters.
Bys
I loved this book! I thought it was well written and the author did a good job in bringing to life the complicated relationship between fickle Greek Gods and their mortals...
The only thing I wish the author had done differently was to really convince me that Alcestis fell madly in love with Persephone in just three days...(so much so that she didn't want to leave...) I wish the author could have elaborated more on this. Other than that, great book! I think someone should turn this into a play, it would be awesome!
Jonide
The book expanded on a the story of Alcestis as told from her point of view. I would have liked to know what happened to some of the supporting characters as they disappeared after a few chapters without explanation.
Hulis
Alcestis is an interesting story, and Beutner gives a good go of it for awhile. But after Alcestis's descent into the underworld it becomes dreary enough to make the reader long to drink the waters of the Lethe. Despite some very good ideas this novel goes nowhere and the end is a fizzle followed by the sort of epilogue that belongs in a the sort of didactic juvenile literature so eager to make sure its message is made clear that it shows no confidence in either itself or its reader.

(What follows contains spoilers)

The flaws are mostly to do with the nature of Alcestis's relationship with Persephone. The idea of pairing Admetus's relationship with the divine Apollo is brilliant, but in the end Alcestis becomes just like her husband, a helpless and willing pawn of the gods. Except that her stereotypical relationship with Persephone is really hard to believe. Persephone is a goddess, yet here she is a tragic seductress right out of a 1950s era Sapphic potboiler. This is combined with the hackneyed romantic trope of the girl in love with death. That this personification of death is a distaff one does not really elevate this above the sort of Victorian death worship exemplified by Alberto Casella Death takes a Holiday.

As an additional complaint, Pelopia, Alcestis's, dramatically unnecessary, brother in this novel, is in every other version of this story, her older sister. Which the feminine name would seem to indicate.
Uylo
The beginning was strong. After she enters the underworld the strange relationship with Persephone was interesting, but the obsession with her sister was distracting and made the story overlong.
Wenyost
As others have noted, this book is actually two stories told in two completely different prose styles. The first part is an astonishingly good magically realistic take on everyday life in ancient Mycenae, circa 1400 BC told in the first person by a granddaughter of Poseidon. Humans and gods mingle freely, and the relationship of Alcestis to her sisters is touchingly beautiful as well as mysterious and intriguing. Alcestis eventually marries Admetus, the king of Pherae. At the time of her marriage, Alcestis is a true, pure, traditional Greek maiden, very young and naive on her wedding night. But there is no consummation. The reason, as Alcestis slowly realizes, is because Admetus is in love with Apollo, with whom she suspects he shares a full sexual relationship. In this imagined telling of the myth, when the marriage remains unconsummated a year later, a now disillusioned Alcestis, chooses to die in the place of her husband and descends into Hades. As befits such a radical change in locale, the literary style changes. The dialog is nonsensical, nothing is familiar, and the writing becomes tedious and dreary. It should be noted that the unconsummated marriage is a great departure from the Alcestis story told in the eponymous play by Euripides whose dying scene includes the sobbing of her children by Admetus. In the Euripides version, Alcestis goes on to insist that in return for taking his place in Hades, Admetus may not remarry nor have a stepmother raise their children.

This part of the review contains spoilers and is shared for those who have already read the book and are unsettled, as I am, about its meaning. To me, this part of the story is not so much the myth re-imagined, but a second story overlaid on the lacuna of the myth for Alcestis' stay in Hades is not tol. Here, Alcestis shares a lesbian love affair with the goddess Persephone, one so powerful that when Heracles comes to return Alcestis to the land of the living, where such a relationship is strictly forbidden, Alcestis is unwilling to go back. During this time, Alcestis is constantly seeking among the numberless shades for the sister, Hippothoe, she lost in early childhood. She confronts her grandmother, Tyro, the one whose coupling with Poseidon produced her father Pelias, about the nature of her relationship to the god. As is almost always the case, the god has tricked Tyro by coming to her disguised as Enipeus, the river god she loved, not an outright rape, but not a loving act. The end of her search for Hippothoe is a painful reminder of the finality of death. When Alcestis is restored to Admetus, and her existence is again circumscribed by the walls of her house as it was for the women of Greece in ancient times, she feels no joy to be still alive. And her relationship with Admetus is again distant and kindly, not passionate and filled with love. I see many feminist themes here, and yet I found this last section taxing and overlong. It is in hindsight, when I am no longer wandering in Hades with Alcestis, that I have come to appreciate the ideas the author has tried to convey about the finality of death and of the circumscribed life women to this day have to deal with in a world whose social rules, structure, and limits are created by the males of our species.

Related to Alcestis

Download An Ideal Wife fb2, epub

An Ideal Wife fb2 epub

Author: Betty Neels
Category: Contemporary
ISBN: 0263807436
Download Alcestis (Greek Drama) fb2, epub

Alcestis (Greek Drama) fb2 epub

Author: Charles Rowan Beye,Euripides
Category: Dramas & Plays
ISBN: 0130434485
Download An Ideal Husband fb2, epub

An Ideal Husband fb2 epub

Author: Oscar Wilde
Category: Classics
ISBN: 1605890871
Download Mob Girl: A Woman's Life in the Underworld fb2, epub

Mob Girl: A Woman's Life in the Underworld fb2 epub

Author: Teresa Carpenter
Category: Regional U.S.
ISBN: 0671683454
Download Edith Wharton's Letters From the Underworld: Fictions of Women and Writing fb2, epub

Edith Wharton's Letters From the Underworld: Fictions of Women and Writing fb2 epub

Author: Candace Waid
Category: History & Criticism
ISBN: 0807843024
Download An Ideal Husband fb2, epub

An Ideal Husband fb2 epub

Author: Oscar Wilde
Category: Humanities
ISBN: 140650243X
Download Doctor Who and the Underworld fb2, epub

Doctor Who and the Underworld fb2 epub

Author: Terrance Dicks
ISBN: 0426200683
Download An Ideal Husband (Webster's Korean Thesaurus Edition) fb2, epub

An Ideal Husband (Webster's Korean Thesaurus Edition) fb2 epub

Author: Oscar Wilde
Category: Schools & Teaching
ISBN: 0497925508
Download Gangland: Underworld in Britain and Ireland Vol 2 fb2, epub

Gangland: Underworld in Britain and Ireland Vol 2 fb2 epub

Author: James Morton
Category: Social Sciences
ISBN: 0316909971