silviacolasanti.it
» » Executioner's Current: Thomas Edison, George Westinghouse, and the Invention of the Electric Chair

Download Executioner's Current: Thomas Edison, George Westinghouse, and the Invention of the Electric Chair fb2, epub

by Richard Moran

Download Executioner's Current: Thomas Edison, George Westinghouse, and the Invention of the Electric Chair fb2, epub

ISBN: 0375410597
Author: Richard Moran
Language: English
Publisher: Knopf; 1 edition (October 15, 2002)
Pages: 304
Category: Engineering
Subcategory: Engineering
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 887
Size Fb2: 1788 kb
Size ePub: 1294 kb
Size Djvu: 1611 kb
Other formats: doc docx rtf mobi


Moran skillfully used the story of the creation of the electric chair to illustrate the brutal clash between Edison and . The majority of the book is about George Westinghouse and Thomas Edison's competition with each other

Moran skillfully used the story of the creation of the electric chair to illustrate the brutal clash between Edison and Westinghouse. Washington Post Book World. The majority of the book is about George Westinghouse and Thomas Edison's competition with each other. It is really repetitive, using the term "quick and painless" so many times I lost count.

Executioner's Current book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

Executioner's Current book. The amazing story of how the electric chair developed not out. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Executioner's Current: Thomas Edison, George Westinghouse, and the Invention of the Electric Chair as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Электронная книга "Executioner's Current: Thomas Edison, George Westinghouse, and the Invention of the Electric Chair", Richard Moran. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iO. . Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Executioner's Current: Thomas Edison, George Westinghouse, and the Invention of the Electric Chair" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Six years later, George Westinghouse lit up Buffalo with his less expensive alternating current (AC)

Six years later, George Westinghouse lit up Buffalo with his less expensive alternating current (AC). The two men quickly became locked in a fierce rivalry, made all the more complicated by a novel new application for their product: the electric chair. In 1882, Thomas Edison ushered in the age of electricity when he illuminated Manhattan’s Pearl Street with his direct current (DC) system.

Westinghouse fought back, attempting to stop the first electrocution and keep AC from becoming the .

Westinghouse fought back, attempting to stop the first electrocution and keep AC from becoming the executioner's current.

About Executioner’s Current. The story of the electric chair also reveals the way in which public policy is often affected by behind the scenes maneuvering of political and economic interests.

The electric current and charge requirements were determined for effective anodic protection (AP) of progressively filled stainless steel tanks. Potentiostatic AP was applied to an upright cylindrical tank of 6 liters capacity, filled with 50% sulfuric acid at various filling rates.

Richard Moran, Executioner's Current: Thomas Edison, George Westinghouse, and the Invention of the Electric Chair, Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group - 2007, page 42. ^ Tesla: Inventor of the Electrical Age by W. Bernard Carlson. Princeton University Press.

You're getting the VIP treatment! With the purchase of Kobo VIP Membership, you're getting 10% off and 2x Kobo Super Points on eligible items. Your Shopping Cart is empty. There are currently no items in your Shopping Cart.

Westinghouse, determined to keep AC from becoming known as the "executioner's current," fought to stop the first electrocution, claiming that use of the electric chair constituted cruel and unusual punishment

Westinghouse, determined to keep AC from becoming known as the "executioner's current," fought to stop the first electrocution, claiming that use of the electric chair constituted cruel and unusual punishment. The legal battle that ensued ended when the Supreme Court refused to rule. The electrocution of William Kemler went forward at New York's Auburn Penitentiary in August 1890 - and was horribly botched.

The amazing story of how the electric chair developed not out of the desire for a method of execution more humane than hanging but of an effort by one nineteenth century electric company to discredit the other.In 1882, Thomas Edison launched “the age of electricity” by lighting up a portion of Manhattan with his direct current (DC) system. Six years later George Westinghouse lit up Buffalo with his less expensive alternating current (AC). They quickly became locked in a battle for market share. Richard Moran shows that Edison, in order to maintain commercial dominance, set out to blacken the image of Westinghouse’s AC by persuading the State of New York to electrocute condemned criminals with AC current. Westinghouse, determined to keep AC from becoming known as the “executioner’s current,” fought to stop the first electrocution, claiming that use of the electric chair constituted cruel and unusual punishment. The legal battle that ensued ended when the Supreme Court refused to rule. The electrocution of William Kemler went forward in New York’s Auburn Pen-itentiary in August 1890—and was horribly botched. Moran makes clear how this industry tug-of-war raised many profound and disturbing questions, not only about electrocution but about the technological nature of the search for a humane method of execution. And the fundamental question, he says, remains with us today: Can execution ever be considered humane? A superbly told tale of industrial and political skullduggery that brings to light a little-known chapter of modern American history.

Comments:

Frey
Good history but too many inconsequential tidbits. Might be interesting to a death row warden. Word me out, totally. JT
Waiso
The majority of the book is about George Westinghouse and Thomas Edison's competition with each other. The rest of it talks about Kemmler's trial which is drawn out and boring. It is really repetitive, using the term "quick and painless" so many times I lost count. This book makes an otherwise fascinating subject quite boring, however the bits about the executions were interesting. Perhaps I'm just sick and twisted and love to read about blood and gore, which this book severely lacks.
Burking
Although I learned some interesting facts, truthfully, this book was dry and boring. It was like reading a long college paper.
caster
I bought this to use in my 6th grade reading classroom. It is excellent to use to teach reading skills such as main idea, author's purpose, or summarizing. I put it in a center and students have 10 minutes to use the book for an assignment. Since it is at a lower reading level, students have success in building skills to use in higher level texts.
Cerana
excellent book
Tujar
Moran begins with America's first execution using that most peculiar of lethal inventions: the electric chair. The execution sets an appropriate tone for a book that is both a history of that invention and an examination of the search for a humane means of executing criminals: the execution of convicted murderer William Kemmler was a cruel, horrific and botched experiment of an electrocution, and proclaimed a "success" despite all of that.
"Executioner's Current" lays the groundwork for this interesting story of how the United States came to employ what was supposedly a novel, enlightened, and humane means of execution -- in actuality only novel -- by describing it's origins in the electrification of America and the early competition over what model this would follow: George Westinghouse's AC model or Thomas Edison's DC model. DC was economically inferior and inefficient compared to Westinghouse's AC system. Being unable to compete on the relative merits of the two technologies, Edison launched a public relations and lobbying campaign that would rival any modern effort for its obfuscations and distortions. The object of this campaign was to paint AC as being too dangerous to use in residential or commercial applications.
Naturally, when New York state was revising it's capital punishment laws at that time, and electrocution came into the debate as a new, possibly more humane means of execution, they consulted the national hero and genius electrician, Thomas Edison. Edison, in the midst of slandering Westinghouse's more efficient electrical distribution technology, told them that AC was so dangerous that it would be the ideal means to execute criminals. This was followed by staged experiments on animals designed to illustrate how lethal (and how relatively safe DC current) AC current was, the invention of a practical electrical chair, and the many electrocutions that have been performed since.
I am not an opponent of the death penalty, but I have always considered the electric chair to be a ridiculous method of execution. Moran's larger point is that the search for a more humane means of execution has little to do with sparing the condemned from suffering, but is more about assuaging the conscience of the persons and larger society that condemned him. To Moran, the more important question than humane means is whether any execution is humane. On this point, I would disagree with him (Moran is clearly an opponent), but the point is one worth making and the question is one worth asking. Between that and the fascinating story, this book is one well worth reading.
Granijurus
I like these little biographies from "Pebble Books"/Capstone. They cover their people with the bare minimum of verbiage which is just right for many circumstances.

This particular book by Lola M. Schaefer Thomas Edison's life. It features a timeline which stretches across the bottoms of the books and it touches briefly on his childhood and time at Menlo Park. And, of course, his inventions and 'improvement's.

I'm using it with my 3rd Grade son to serve as the 'base' for his book report on Edison. We have other books that give more detail, but I think Ms. Schaefer neatly summarizes the basics in the easiest possible way in this book; so we will read it first, and read it last to help him organize his thoughts and the other information his learns.

196 Words at the Second Grade level.

Pam T~
mom/blogger
While this book may not be enough to push you over the line to rejecting the death penalty, it will certainly make you think about it. A very enticing read, the book touches upon complicated legal entanglements and medical issues without becoming too hard to understand. However, for those with little interest in criminal justice (or the mechanics of electricity), this is probably not a wise choice.
This book starts out being about criminal William Kemmler and the first case in which the electric chair was used. However, as the story progresses, it becomes more and more a tale of Thomas Edison (America's prized inventor and advocate of direct current) and his primary competitor George Westinghouse, who utalizes alternating current. Moran paints a dark picture of Edison, who will seemingly stop at nothing to slanderize Westinghouse by encouraging use of alternating currents for electrocution. This proves a major problem for Westinghouse, because in having his current branded an 'executioner's current', something dangerous to the public and only suited for providing death, he could lose valuable customers.
In this work, Moran's primary goal is to show how the invention and enactment of the electric chair as America's primary method of execution was chiefly motivated not by a desire to improve the humaneness of execution, but by corporate greed. When Edison and his lackey Harold Brown (another electrician) propetuate propaganda about alternating current as 'the best current for electrocutions due to its deadly nature', they are not looking out for the public's well being but for the good of Edison's company. And even when intentions for a better method of execution are good, as Moran points out, 'no execution can really be considered humane'.

Related to Executioner's Current: Thomas Edison, George Westinghouse, and the Invention of the Electric Chair

Download Thomas A. Edison (Da Capo series in science) fb2, epub

Thomas A. Edison (Da Capo series in science) fb2 epub

Author: Robert E Conot
Category: Engineering
ISBN: 0306802619
Download The diary of Thomas A. Edison fb2, epub

The diary of Thomas A. Edison fb2 epub

Author: Thomas A Edison
ISBN: 0856990183
Download Thomas Edison - The Great Inventor (DK Readers Level 4) fb2, epub

Thomas Edison - The Great Inventor (DK Readers Level 4) fb2 epub

Author: DK,Caryn Jenner
Category: Literature & Fiction
ISBN: 1405321458
Download Westinghouse Brake  Signal in Chippenham: In Photographs 1894 to 1981 fb2, epub

Westinghouse Brake Signal in Chippenham: In Photographs 1894 to 1981 fb2 epub

Author: Mark Glover
Category: Photography & Video
ISBN: 0956736203
Download The Electric Force of a Current: Weber and the surface charges of resistive conductors carrying steady currents fb2, epub

The Electric Force of a Current: Weber and the surface charges of resistive conductors carrying steady currents fb2 epub

Author: Andre Koch Torres Assis,Julio Akashi Hernandes
Category: Physics
ISBN: 097329115X
Download Edison: A Biography fb2, epub

Edison: A Biography fb2 epub

Author: Matthew Josephson
Category: Professionals & Academics
ISBN: 0471548065
Download DK Readers L4: Thomas Edison: The Great Inventor fb2, epub

DK Readers L4: Thomas Edison: The Great Inventor fb2 epub

Author: Caryn Jenner
Category: Literature & Fiction
ISBN: 0756629462