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Download Into the Fire: A Firsthand Account of the Most Extraordinary Battle in the Afghan War fb2, epub

by Bing West,Dakota Meyer

Download Into the Fire: A Firsthand Account of the Most Extraordinary Battle in the Afghan War fb2, epub

ISBN: 0812993403
Author: Bing West,Dakota Meyer
Language: English
Publisher: Random House (September 25, 2012)
Pages: 256
Category: Leaders & Notable People
Subcategory: Biography
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 190
Size Fb2: 1161 kb
Size ePub: 1156 kb
Size Djvu: 1625 kb
Other formats: mobi mbr txt azw


Into the Fire is a deeply compelling tale of valor and duty. In 2011, he was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for his unyielding courage in the battle of Ganjigal. He now competes at charity events in skeet and rifle competitions.

Into the Fire is a deeply compelling tale of valor and duty. Dakota Meyer will not identify as a hero, but he will, I think, accept the title warrior. Dakota's storytelling is precise and, for a Medal of Honor recipient, touchingly humble. With deft prose he drops us smack in the middle of one of the most heinous small unit firefights of the current wars. He also speaks frequently at schools and veterans’ events to raise awareness of our military and remains dedicated to the causes of our veterans.

Jacket photograph: (c) Dakota Meyer. The battle of Ganjigal resulted in the largest loss of American advisors, the highest number of distinguished awards for valor, and the most controversial investigations for dereliction of duty in the entire Afghanistan war. This is the story of a man who was awarded the Medal of Honor for his bravery in that battle. We four advisors moved into our own bunkhouse in the Afghan section, which you call a hooch-probably a word picked up by soldiers during the Vietnam war. Our little hooch had concrete walls inside. Ropes were nailed along the walls like towel racks to hang some of your stuff.

Dakota Meyer in a battle in Afghanistan, in which his best friends were KIA and he distinguished himself in gallantry and bravery

Dakota Meyer in a battle in Afghanistan, in which his best friends were KIA and he distinguished himself in gallantry and bravery. He trained hard, and that training and luck saved his life, during a 6 hour long battle in which his squad was ambushed by overpowering Taliban firepower from a superior position on high ground on three sides. Dakota was almost captured when a Taliban kushman tapped him on the shoulder while he was recovering the body of his Afghan soldier buddy. His quick thinking enabled him to stun the enemy soldier and kill him in hand to hand combat with a rock.

The book centers on his experience in the bloody fighting at Ganjgal. Meyer pulls no punches when it comes the disastrous planning and execution of the mission

The story of what Dakota did. will be told for generations  . The book centers on his experience in the bloody fighting at Ganjgal. Meyer pulls no punches when it comes the disastrous planning and execution of the mission. Meyer and his team were advisors to the Afghan forces and stationed at an army compound. Essentially what happened was that the men walked into a kill zone. Stuck in the open and facing well-armed Taliban who crossed over from Pakistan, chaos ensued.

Authors: West, Bing, Meyer, Dakota. Johnson assigned each of us a specific job. He took on the tasks of improving the leadership procedures of the Afghan officers and coordinating our activities with those of Dog Company. He was the perfect guy for that job-sunny and smiling, with an easy laugh, but completely professional, with the highest standards. I had climbed mountains with him in California, of course, and I knew he was as strong physically as he was mentally.

In Into the Fire, Dakota Meyer recounts his actions in battle that earned him high distinction. One of the most recent citations, that of Marine Sgt. Dakota L. Meyer, who earned a Medal of Honor for his actions during a 2009 engagement in Afghanistan’s Ganjigal Valley, sounds the note once again, describing Meyer as having seized the initiative when he and another Marine, leaving the rally point where they had been posted, drove their vehicle through an exposed wash five times under heavy fire to retrieve wounded Afghan.

With a brave driver at the wheel, Meyer stood in the gun turret exposed to withering fire, rallying Afghan troops to follow. Over the course of the five hours, he charged into the valley time and again.

This blog is about the book, "Into The Fire" written by Medal of Honor recipient, Dakota Meyer, and the . It was on November 6, 2010, that General Amos, the Combatant of the Marines Corps said that a living Marine had been nominated for the Medal of Honor

This blog is about the book, "Into The Fire" written by Medal of Honor recipient, Dakota Meyer, and the time he spent serving our country. It was on November 6, 2010, that General Amos, the Combatant of the Marines Corps said that a living Marine had been nominated for the Medal of Honor. It was revealed that the Marine was Dakota Meyer in "The Marine Corps Times". When the staff of President Obama tried to contact Dakota, they were informed that he was working his job in construction and should call when he was on his lunch break.

The battle of Ganjigal resulted in the largest loss of American advisors, the highest number of distinguished awards for valor, and the most controversial investigations for dereliction of duty in the entire Afghanistan war.

Authors: Bing West,Dakota Meyer. The Afghan drivers were huddled together in a ditch by the river. The ambush had been sprung about ninety minutes earlier. By now they had pissed themselves dry and had nowhere to go.

“The story of what Dakota did . . . will be told for generations.”—President Barack Obama, from remarks given at Meyer’s Medal of Honor ceremonyIn the fall of 2009, Taliban insurgents ambushed a patrol of Afghan soldiers and Marine advisors in a mountain village called Ganjigal. Firing from entrenched positions, the enemy was positioned to wipe out one hundred men who were pinned down and were repeatedly refused artillery support. Ordered to remain behind with the vehicles, twenty-one year-old Marine corporal Dakota Meyer disobeyed orders and attacked to rescue his comrades.             With a brave driver at the wheel, Meyer stood in the gun turret exposed to withering fire, rallying Afghan troops to follow. Over the course of the five hours, he charged into the valley time and again. Employing a variety of machine guns, rifles, grenade launchers, and even a rock, Meyer repeatedly repulsed enemy attackers, carried wounded Afghan soldiers to safety, and provided cover for dozens of others to escape—supreme acts of valor and determination. In the end, Meyer and four stalwart comrades—an Army captain, an Afghan sergeant major, and two Marines—cleared the battlefield and came to grips with a tragedy they knew could have been avoided. For his actions on that day, Meyer became the first living Marine in three decades to be awarded the Medal of Honor.   Into the Fire tells the full story of the chaotic battle of Ganjigal for the first time,  in a compelling, human way that reveals it as a microcosm of our recent wars. Meyer takes us from his upbringing on a farm in Kentucky, through his Marine and sniper training, onto the battlefield, and into the vexed aftermath of his harrowing exploits in a battle that has become the stuff of legend.    Investigations ensued, even as he was pitched back into battle alongside U.S. Army soldiers who embraced him as a fellow grunt. When it was over, he returned to the States to confront living with the loss of his closest friends. This is a tale of American values and upbringing, of stunning heroism, and of adjusting to loss and to civilian life.   We see it all through Meyer’s eyes, bullet by bullet, with raw honesty in telling of both the errors that resulted in tragedy and the resolve of American soldiers, U.S. Marines, and Afghan soldiers who’d been abandoned and faced certain death.    Meticulously researched and thrillingly told, with nonstop pace and vivid detail, Into the Fire is the unvarnished story of a modern American hero.Praise for Into the Fire   “A story of men at their best and at their worst . . . leaves you gaping in admiration at Medal of Honor winner Dakota Meyer’s courage.”—National Review   “Meyer’s dazzling bravery wasn’t momentary or impulsive but deliberate and sustained.”—The Wall Street Journal   “[A] cathartic, heartfelt account . . . Combat memoirs don’t get any more personal.”—Kirkus Reviews   “A great contribution to the discussion of an agonizingly complex subject.”—The Virginian-Pilot  Black Hawk Down meets Lone Survivor.”—Library Journal

Comments:

Cobandis
First off, I want to be clear about the focus of my review. Book reviews should center on the genre (type) of book, the content as it is expressed within the genre, and the quality of the writing itself (and how that writing meets or does not meet the demands of its target audience). In case you hadn't already guessed, I am both an English teacher and a writer, so I would like to think I have a bit of experience in this area.
First, genre. This book is an autobiography, centering largely on Meyers' experiences at the battle of Ganjigal and its aftermath. As a result, you are going to hear strong opinions, raw emotion, and bloody accounts. You may not agree with them. That is fine. But do not be shocked that this man, this Marine who came as close to Hell as the living can, has a lot to say about it. Again, this is an autobiography, written by the author about himself. Therefore, it should come as no surprise that the author will have definite opinions about his own life, and that they do not always please the masses. That is not the point of an autobiography. If bloody imagery, angry recriminations against military leaders, and honest portrayal of personal attributes don't appeal to you, that is also fine. But autobiography is then not the genre for you. For rip-roaring accounts of military bravery where the good guys always win (and are perfect), the bad guys always lose, and no one dies, I suggest the fiction section. For everyone else, if you can handle the description above, you will probably appreciate this young man's account. It satisfies the requirements for an autobiography quite well. I would have liked to know more about the author's early life, but being that he seems naturally to be a man of few words--and that the book is about his combat experiences--I can easily overlook that.
As for the content, in the context of military literature, Meyers sums up the key points without becoming verbose. He does repeat certain points, but if you read the entire book, it is quite easy to see why! Some readers will find his lack of explanation of some of the acronyms frustrating. However, this problem is easily remedied by a Google search of any term not understood (just as you would look up words with which you were unfamiliar in a dictionary). I hope the possibility of encountering unfamiliar words will not discourage anyone from reading the book. There are maps and full-color pictures included in the book. I found the first confusing and the second illuminating. You may feel differently, but either way, these extras in no way detract from the reading. As far as actual text is concerned, while Meyers spends a lot of time downplaying his own actions, he simultaneously gives credit to those who helped that day. Those who appreciate fairness and humility in an autobiography will most likely enjoy this book. Some readers may find some of his comments about killing disturbing. That is understandable. I view these comments as coming from a grieving heart that has been trained for combat. I may not agree with every single thing the man says, but nor do I judge him for it.
Finally: writing meeting the target audience's requirements. Some books are written for children, some for adults, some for specific segments of the population, and some for everyone. This book was written for everyone. Meyers wants people to know what happened (in hopes it will never happen again) and to honor his friends. It is not written by an academic; it is written by a young man who signed up for the Marines at 17 years old. The writing is of a simple and unsophisticated style. Bing West, the acclaimed journalist who helped Meyers write the book, makes very clear that the words are Meyers', not West's. If simple, unpolished writing is not for you, that is fine. But choose a different book. I enjoyed it precisely because Meyers, the man who was actually there, is the narrator.
This book is uncompromising in its candor and unapologetic in its pathos. It is not pretty, sanitized, or neatly wrapped up at the end. Life isn't always that way, either. And that is what an autobiography is: the story of someone's life. In this case, it is the story of a combat veteran, and as such, it meets the requirements for a good story. Furthermore, if this man can live through these experiences and be brave enough to share them, I feel that the least I can do is respectfully and thoughtfully listen to what he has to say. I can consider the large-scale effects of war, as well as its effects on individuals, without lapsing into hasty judgments. My advice for potential readers is to focus on the story itself, for that more than meets the requirements for compelling autobiography.
Vispel
I work with guy who did two tours in Afghanistan. I knew him before he left for his first tour. He was army reserve before he was called to service. A willing and eager participant true blue American ready and happy to serve his country. The man that has come back isn't same guy who left. I know very little about the war in Afghanistan and wanted to learn a little of what my friend went through. This book describes one epic battle among many that have taken place. A very descript horrifying story. Dakota Meyer true American hero that I will always admire and not soon forget. I will never understand rules of engagement established by a committee that in lot of cases never have seen combat. This book is a must read very well written not sugar coated at all about the bad politics of war in general.
Sharpbrew
This is the most intense and moving story, of Cpl. Dakota Meyer in a battle in Afghanistan, in which his best friends were KIA and he distinguished himself in gallantry and bravery. He trained hard, and that training and luck saved his life, during a 6 hour long battle in which his squad was ambushed by overpowering Taliban firepower from a superior position on high ground on three sides.

Dakota was almost captured when a Taliban kushman tapped him on the shoulder while he was recovering the body of his Afghan soldier buddy. His quick thinking enabled him to stun the enemy soldier and kill him in hand to hand combat with a rock. This book describes the intensity of the fighting, of having bullets whiz past his ears and head, tilling up the ground around his feet during the operation, the numbness of treating other soldiers who were severely wounded, and finding bodies of friends who died when he was unable to help them due to higher ups in the chain of command.

I highly recommend this book if you wish to know what close combat is like in Afghanistan, and the gut wrenching terror and bravery that this US Marine displayed for which he was awarded the Medal of Honor!
Voodoosida
Excellent story! Very similar to 13 Hours.
But it has the typical punctuation-challenged writing that most books seem to have these days. I wish these publishing types would modernize their style guide like use of commas, get rid of all semicolons (just end the sentence), and parenthesis instead of dashes, em dashes, semicolons, and so on to separate essential from non-essential phrases/clauses. Nearly everything is an "aside" inside of an "aside." Like stuffing a sidebar into another sidebar, in the middle of a sentence. It's hard to figure out what the main sentence is. Remove all those non-essential phrases/clauses and you are left with a short (but understandable) sentence. Those "explanations within an explanation" (I call those "nested asides") gets in the way of good writing.

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