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Download African Queen: The Real Life of the Hottentot Venus fb2, epub

by Rachel Holmes

Download African Queen: The Real Life of the Hottentot Venus fb2, epub

ISBN: 1400061369
Author: Rachel Holmes
Language: English
Publisher: Random House (January 2, 2007)
Pages: 176
Category: Historical
Subcategory: Biography
Rating: 4.3
Votes: 386
Size Fb2: 1776 kb
Size ePub: 1751 kb
Size Djvu: 1890 kb
Other formats: lrf txt txt lrf


According to Rachel Holmes, author of "African Queen: The Real The Hottentot Venus exhibit-promising to present a rare African woman from the Hottentot region for public view-opened in London in 1810 to an expectant audience waiting to see the new curiosity otherwise known as Saartjie ("Saar-key") Baartman. Saartjie's skills as a performer combined with her particularly large buttocks and allusions to her supposedly extended labia only added to the exhibit's appeal to rich (white) Londoners.

African Queen: The Real . .has been added to your Cart. Although slavery in the Cape Colony was abolished in 1808, the Hottentot Proclamation, while offering some degree of protection to the Khoisan people, permitted indentured servitude.

The Hottentot Venus was really Saartjie Baartman, an orphan, a servant and then an object of curiosity. It is difficult not to be propelled through African Queen

The Hottentot Venus was really Saartjie Baartman, an orphan, a servant and then an object of curiosity. It is difficult not to be propelled through African Queen. The story of Saartjie Baartman - the Hottentot Venus’s real name - is inherently fascinating, and littered with a diverse cast of highly unlikable characters, ranging from Baartman’s lowly black South African master, Hendrik Cesars, to the foremost European scientist of the day, Georges Léopold Chrétien Cuvier. For Holmes, Baartman’s journey as an object of European curiosity and African exploitation began on the veld of South Africa’s Eastern Cape.

Excerpted by permission.

From this extraordinary phenomenon of nature, the Public will have an opportunity of judging how far she exceeds any description given by historians of that tribe of the human race. Excerpted by permission.

In African Queen, Rachel Holmes recounts the luminous, heartbreaking story of one woman’s journey from .

In African Queen, Rachel Holmes recounts the luminous, heartbreaking story of one woman’s journey from slavery to stardom. Born into a herding tribe known as the Eastern Cape Khoisan, Saartjie was barely out of her teens when she was orphaned and widowed by colonial war and forced aboard a ship bound for England.

This article is a political and intellectual biography about Louis Francoeur (1895-1941), one of the most influential French-Canadian journalists of the 1930s

This article is a political and intellectual biography about Louis Francoeur (1895-1941), one of the most influential French-Canadian journalists of the 1930s.

Электронная книга "African Queen: The Real Life of the Hottentot Venus", Rachel Holmes. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "African Queen: The Real Life of the Hottentot Venus" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

hottentot deshumanisation, zoos humains, venus hottentot, esclavage. They were business owners and politicians, trailblazers and cattle queens, but how many of these 11 influential Texas women do you know?

hottentot deshumanisation, zoos humains, venus hottentot, esclavage. Find this Pin and more on Human Tricks by Michelle R. Tags. They were business owners and politicians, trailblazers and cattle queens, but how many of these 11 influential Texas women do you know? Enterpriser Suite.

African Queen: The Real Life of the Hottentot Venus. As her fame spread to Paris, Saartjie became a lightning rod for late Georgian and Napoleonic attitudes toward sex and race, exploitation and colonialism, prurience and science. In African Queen, Rachel Holmes recounts the luminous, heartbreaking story of one woman’s journey from slavery to stardom.

Venus, by Rachel Holmes, Journal of Historical Biography 2 (Autumn. 2007): 97-99, ww. cfv. Baartman was a Khoisan woman from South Africa, brought to England to a strange career on the stages of first London, then the provinces, and finally Paris.

Saartjie Baartman was twenty-one years old when she was taken from her native South Africa and shipped to London. Within weeks, the striking African beauty was the talk of the social season of 1810–hailed as “the Hottentot Venus” for her exquisite physique and suggestive semi-nude dance. As her fame spread to Paris, Saartjie became a lightning rod for late Georgian and Napoleonic attitudes toward sex and race, exploitation and colonialism, prurience and science. In African Queen, Rachel Holmes recounts the luminous, heartbreaking story of one woman’s journey from slavery to stardom.Born into a herding tribe known as the Eastern Cape Khoisan, Saartjie was barely out of her teens when she was orphaned and widowed by colonial war and forced aboard a ship bound for England. A pair of clever, unscrupulous showmen dressed her up in a body stocking with a suggestive fringe and put her on the London stage as a “specimen” of African beauty and sexuality. The Hottentot Venus was an overnight sensation.But celebrity brought unexpected consequences. Abolitionists initiated a lawsuit to win Saartjie’s freedom, a case that electrified the English public. In Paris, a team of scientists subjected her to a humiliating public inspection as they probed the mystery of her sexual allure. Stared at, stripped, pinched, painted, worshipped, and ridiculed, Saartjie came to symbolize the erotic obsession at the heart of colonialism. But beneath the costumes and the glare of publicity, this young Khoisan woman was a person who had been torn from her own culture and sacrificed to the whims of fashionable Europe.Nearly two centuries after her death, Saartjie made headlines once again when Nelson Mandela launched a campaign to have her remains returned to the land of her birth. In this brilliant, vividly written book, Rachel Holmes traces the full arc of Saartjie’s extraordinary story–a story of race, eros, oppression, and fame that resonates powerfully today.

Comments:

Frei
This is a light, short history of the "Hottentot Venus," a fascinating figure as others have described in their excellent reviews.

I only wanted to add that, in my opinion, the book does not do justice to the figure.

First, I think the author is somewhat out of her depth, particularly as it relates to tying together colonialism, slavery, African relations, sexuality and other issues swirling around this amazing woman.

Admittedly these are huge and complex topics, but the author's half-hearted and glancing efforts just don't do the trick and she might have been better off just sticking with a straight biography.

Secondly, the writing is below-par for books of this kind, and you just never feel a building narrative or even personal connection to the many people involved in manipulating, enabling, and profiting from this tragic person.

In sum, I'm glad I read the book as I knew nothing about the Hottentot Venus, but I think a better, more comprehensive treatment still lies out there.
Kefrannan
very pleased
Morad
Read an article in the Washington Post about this book so I decided to order it. I was not disappointed. Very interesting read.
Wizer
Ahhh, a great book. Just what I was looking for.
Nakora
A sad life for a poor young girl ends tragically. The ugliness of human nature reveals itself in righteous Victorian England.
Ironrunner
Very informative. Written with heart, respect and courage. Lots of historical context. Shedding valuable details into the life of an icon.
Longitude Temporary
Wonderful creative non-fiction.
Reading it as research for a show & loving it.
Definitely recommend this book.
Edges of pages are cool.
“African Queen: The Real Life of the Hottentot Venus” by Rachel Holmes is a well-researched, factual account of an amazing, though distressing story. Saartjie Baartman, the woman who became known as the Hottentot Venus, was descended from the eastern Cape Khoisan people of South Africa. During the colonial period, she was taken to Britain in 1810 where she performed, playing a musical instrument called a ramkie, and danced and sang - but mainly was displayed to show off her anatomy consisting of large buttocks and elongated genital labia. In one quote, Saartjie was described as "a semiscientific ethnographic curiosity, [who] offered sexual tourism dressed up as education"

In 1814, she was taken to France, where she performed and posed in Paris in 1814 and 1815. She posed at the Museum of Natural History in Paris where men, in the interest of “science” could receive a " close-up view of the legendary somatic attributes of a Khoisan woman” On December 29, 1815, she died at the age of 26. After her death, she was dissected and “between 1822 and the 1850s, the keepers of the National Museum of Natural History placed Saartjie's skeleton, body cast, brain, and genitals on public display; and there they remained until the 1970s."

Nelson Mandela, as President of South Africa, demanded the return of her remains in 1994 and it took until 2002 for that to finally happen. This moving story is objectively told with detailed notes and citations, describing a very dark chapter in world history. While it could be longer and deeper, it provides just enough to tell the story.

Of particular interest is the description of legal maneuvering to justify this atrocity. Numerous legal issues are addressed in the book related to colonialism and slavery and involve Dutch, British, French, and international law. Although slavery in the Cape Colony was abolished in 1808, the Hottentot Proclamation, while offering some degree of protection to the Khoisan people, permitted indentured servitude. When Saartjie was in Britain, some parties attempted to secure her freedom, and had a writ of habeas corpus issued, followed by a trial in which the court found Saartjie “could voluntarily degrade herself for the price named.” In France, legal haggling surrounded her display and dissection, and it took an 8 year legal dance to finally transfer her remains.

The book is informative, enlightening even, and very thought-provoking. Although some opinion and political commentary is unavoidable in such an account, the author remained balanced, stuck to facts, and leaves it mostly to the reader to feel the impact of what had happened.

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