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Download The Bitter Sea: Coming of Age in a China Before Mao fb2, epub

by Charles N. Li

Download The Bitter Sea: Coming of Age in a China Before Mao fb2, epub

ISBN: 0061709549
Author: Charles N. Li
Language: English
Publisher: Harper Perennial; Reprint edition (March 10, 2009)
Pages: 304
Category: Historical
Subcategory: Biography
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 856
Size Fb2: 1805 kb
Size ePub: 1916 kb
Size Djvu: 1458 kb
Other formats: lrf doc azw lit


There are many good narratives by survivors of this period in Chinese history

Also, Li Nai felt shock at seeing the quietness of the cities under Mao, the lack of street life and entrepreneurs. The book is straight-forward and truthful, but not great writing. There are many good narratives by survivors of this period in Chinese history. This short narrative, by the son of a player in the drama of 20th century China, is unique for its descriptions of the number of facets of Chinese life experienced by the author as a boy and young man.

Learning about Li's hard life in China helped me put my own discomforts in. .There are many good narratives by survivors of this period in Chinese history

Learning about Li's hard life in China helped me put my own discomforts in perspective! Li's descriptions are occasionally horrific and always captivating. He gives some historical background on Chang Kai Shek, Mao and the one with whom his father aligned in working for the Japanese puppet government in China.

The book ends when Li comes to America. Before leaving his teens he had lived in sheltered wealth and in the slums . Charles Li's story of his life in China is a must read. I found it to be well written and difficult to put down. I took that to mean he's working on Part Two of his life's story and I will be among the first in line to read it. A Survivor's Story.

Li saw his family's fortunes dashed when Chiang Kai-shek's Nationalists came to power in 1945, transforming his father .

Li saw his family's fortunes dashed when Chiang Kai-shek's Nationalists came to power in 1945, transforming his father from a powerful official to a prisoner jailed for treason. He survived a year in a dangerous Nanjing slum and watched from his aunt's Shanghai apartment as the Communist army marched in and seized the city in 1948. In this exceptional memoir, Charles N. Li brings into focus the growth pains of a nation undergoing torturous rebirth and offers an intimate understanding of the intricate, subtle, and yet all-powerful traditions that bind the Chinese family. Born near the beginning of World War II, Li Na was the youngest son of a wealthy Chinese government official.

Lyrical and luminous, intense and extraordinary, The Bitter Sea is an unforgettable true story of a young man, his father, and his country.

He saw his father jailed for treason and his family's fortunes dashed when Chiang Kai-shek's Nationalists came to power in 1945. He watched from his aunt's Shanghai apartment as the Communist army seized the city in 1948. Lyrical and luminous, intense and extraordinary, The Bitter Sea is an unforgettable true story of a young man, his father, and his country. Похожие книги: Politics of Hope and the Bitter Heritage – American Liberalism in the 1960s. Arthur M Schlesinger.

Charles N. L. Download PDF book format. Li, Charles . 1940-. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. The bitter sea : coming of age in a China before Mao Charles N. Li. Book's title: The bitter sea : coming of age in a China before Mao Charles N. Library of Congress Control Number: 2007025697.

In this memoir, Charles N. Li brings into focus the . Li saw his family's fortunes dashed when Chiang Kai-shek's Nationalists came to power in 1945, transforming his father from a powerful official to a prisoner jailed for treason

In this memoir, Charles N. Li saw his family's fortunes dashed when Chiang Kai-shek's Nationalists came to power in 1945, transforming his father from a powerful official to a prisoner jailed for treason. Save to Library.

The Bitter Sea: Coming of Age in a China Before Mao. oceedings{Li2008TheBS, title {The Bitter Sea: Coming of Age in a China Before Mao}, author {Charles N. Li}, year {2008} }. Charles N.

Born near the beginning of World War II, Li Na was the youngest son of a wealthy Chinese government official. He saw his father jailed for treason and his family's fortunes dashed when Chiang Kai-shek's Nationalists came to power in 1945. He watched from his aunt's Shanghai apartment as the Communist army seized the city in 1948. He experienced the heady materialism of the decadent foreign "white ghosts" in British Hong Kong and starved within the harsh confines of a Communist reform school. Over the course of twenty-one tumultuous years, he went from Li Na, the dutiful Chinese son yearning for a stern, manipulative father's love, to Charles, an independent Chinese American seeking no one's approval but his own.

Lyrical and luminous, intense and extraordinary, The Bitter Sea is an unforgettable true story of a young man, his father, and his country.

Comments:

Invissibale
"The Bitter Sea" is the BEST kind of autobiography; it's riveting, fast paced, beautifully written, and educational. When I say that it "reads like a novel" I mean that as a compliment.

I read "The Bitter Sea" while hurricane Ike raged around me and during the aftermath I read it by candlelight. Learning about Li's hard life in China helped me put my own discomforts in perspective! Li's descriptions are occasionally horrific and always captivating.

The book ends when Li comes to America...with a promise that his experiences with the two opposing societies are a story for another day...I took that to mean he's working on Part Two of his life's story and I will be among the first in line to read it.
Rude
The Bitter Sea will surprise you with its candor and historical insight into pre and post WWII China and Hong Kong.

More importantly it will personalize the spirit of the times through the authors biographical perspective through the story of his own life.
Elastic Skunk
Unexpected clear memoir of surviving China 1940-1961 by a son of a top government official brings reality to those who are too young to know or remember. The focus is on a Confucian father-son relationship, but the story is far more than that. For Chinese families who experienced a similiar journey through social upheavals and relocations in Nanjing, Shanghai, Hong Kong, and Guangzhou, this narrative sheds light on the historical and cultural changes that have iimpacted the lives of the 1949 Chinese diaspora. I look foward to the author's next memoir of his life in America.
Chilele
Every thing was all around "PERFECT". Yes, I would buy from this seller again.
Feri
Bought it for a class. We were supposed to read a section a week. I finished the entire book in three sittings. So good.
Winawel
In the last pages of his book he talks about acclimating to the US and he hopes to write that story someday. The book was written in 2008 so I'm guessing it's not going to happen. Found it at a swap meet and read it over the weekend. I looked for any follow up news but it looks like this is it. I knew there were two Chinese languages, Cantonese and Mandarin, but he says Shanghai also has a separate language. He gives some historical background on Chang Kai Shek, Mao and the one with whom his father aligned in working for the Japanese puppet government in China. Very well written.
Androwyn
The period from 1940 to 1961 was a "tumultuous period of war, calamity, upheaval, and transformation in China, where killing, depredation, dehumanization, and the infliction of suffering occurred every day, everywhere", according to Charles Li in this book. The book tells the story of the author's childhood as the son of a high-ranking official in the short-lived Wang Jingwei regime which collaborated with the Japanese occupying forces during the 1940s.

After enjoying a wealthy but lonely early childhood, the author lived in a Nanjing slum with his mother and siblings after his father was imprisoned, then moved to Shanghai to live with his aunt and attend school, before moving to Hong Kong to join his family after the Communists came to power. Some lonely years in a Hong Kong secondary school were followed by a disastrous year back in China where the author failed to submit to re-education.

The book is funny, moving and sad, all at the same time. It is striking how the author's happiest days coincided with his family's lowest financial fortunes, when he freely roamed the Nanjing slum. There are memorable descriptions of a number of characters including Aunt Helen who became an economics professor after deleting "home" from her home economics degree, and Comrade Liu, the pious communist in charge of political indoctrination, but the most detailed characterisation is reserved for the author's father, with whom he had a distant and troubled relationship.

For Western readers who feel that they really should know some more about China, the book provides an entertaining and stimulating insight into China during the second world war and the early years of the Mao regime, while at the same time providing cultural insights into traditional Chinese family relationships and particularly relationships between fathers and sons.
There are many good narratives by survivors of this period in Chinese history. This short narrative, by the son of a player in the drama of 20th century China, is unique for its descriptions of the number of facets of Chinese life experienced by the author as a boy and young man.

Before leaving his teens he had lived in sheltered wealth and in the slums of Nanjing, in the freewheeling city of Shanghai, in various places in Hong Kong (including living through the exodus of refugees within 3 days of border closure) and in a "reform school" on mainland China. We learn about each of these through his descriptions and anecdotes.

The chapter on the "reform school" needs to be incorporated in larger annals of modern Chinese history. He tells how students who went back to their mother country to carve out careers in the "new China" were separated by previous country, how they lived, ate, swatted flies and received an education that did not need books. With student Mei's revenge, you forget the seriousness of his transgression for a moment because you just have to laugh out loud.

Most dramatic is the portrait of the author's father, whose high station in life resulted from his important role in the Japanese occupation. The advice he gives his son is like that of Machiavelli to the young Prince. In the beginning we have the child's eye view of how the family's good fortune during the Japanese occupation ended, and later the author's adult perspective on how his father became the man that he was.

I was surprised to see, at the end that the author credits Judith Regan for initiating the project and encouraging him in writing this book.

I highly recommend this book for anyone interested in 20th century China.

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