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by Patrick Lane

Download What the Stones Remember: A Life Rediscovered fb2, epub

ISBN: 1590302540
Author: Patrick Lane
Language: English
Publisher: Trumpeter; 1st Trumpeter Ed edition (September 13, 2005)
Pages: 288
Category: Arts & Literature
Subcategory: Biography
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 185
Size Fb2: 1905 kb
Size ePub: 1556 kb
Size Djvu: 1205 kb
Other formats: lrf mbr azw mobi


What the Stones Remember is a dark and beautiful memoir. There are scenes in this book so terrifyingly beautiful they take your breath away. Patrick Lane guides us across a grueling landscape with a steady hand

What the Stones Remember is a dark and beautiful memoir. Lane, ever the poet, exudes an elegance in his writing even when describing brutality. Minneapolis Star-Tribune. At once courageous, honest, and uplifting, this book of wisdom and wonder should be savored. Patrick Lane guides us across a grueling landscape with a steady hand. This is a tremendous contribution by an author at the peak of his power. This is the best book I’ve read in a decade.

What the Stones Remember book. Start by marking What the Stones Remember: A Life Rediscovered as Want to Read

What the Stones Remember book. Start by marking What the Stones Remember: A Life Rediscovered as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Lane, Patrick, Lane, Patrick, Lane, Patrick, 1939-, Recovering alcoholics, Poets, Canadian, Natural history, Naturalists, Gardeners, Gardening, Poets, Canadian (English), Jardinage, Poètes canadiens-anglais, Jardiniers, Alcooliques en réadaptation. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on September 19, 2013.

Patrick Lane has written a memoir of heartbreaking struggle that manages to be beautiful and encouraging, finding anchorage in what was once . What the stones remember: a life rediscovered, Patrick Lane-1st Trumpeter ed. p. cm. Originally published as: There is a season.

Patrick Lane has written a memoir of heartbreaking struggle that manages to be beautiful and encouraging, finding anchorage in what was once called Creation, the natural world and its unstinting promise of renewal. A tough, lovely book.

Автор: Lane Patrick Название: What the Stones Remember: A Life Rediscovered Издательство: Random . What the Stones Remember is the emerging chronicle of Lanes attempt to face those memories, as well as his new self-to rediscover his life.

What the Stones Remember is the emerging chronicle of Lanes attempt to face those memories, as well as his new self-to rediscover his life.

What the Stones Remember is the emerging chronicle of Lane's attempt to face those memories, as well as his new self-to rediscover his life

What the Stones Remember is the emerging chronicle of Lane's attempt to face those memories, as well as his new self-to rediscover his life. In this exquisitely written memoir, poet Patrick Lane describes his raw and tender emergence at age sixty from a lifetime of alcohol and drug addiction. Похожие книги: Killer Brands: Create and Market a Brand That Will Annihilate the Competition. What's the difference between a ho-hum product that hu. т 1789. The Very Persistent Gappers of Frip. Three families live in the seaside village.

In this exquisitely written memoir, poet Patrick Lane describes his raw and tender emergence at age sixty from a. .

In this exquisitely written memoir, poet Patrick Lane describes his raw and tender emergence at age sixty from a lifetime of alcohol and drug addiction.

What the Stones Remember: A Life Rediscovered. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere. Publisher: Random House Publishing GroupReleased: Dec 12, 2006ISBN: 9780834826953Format: book.

picked up at the Memphis Public Library Friends of the Library book sale for fifty cents!

picked up at the Memphis Public Library Friends of the Library book sale for fifty cents! Journal Entry 2 by Rita-Booke at Starbucks at Stage and Kirby Whitten in Bartlett, Tennessee USA on Saturday, January 16, 2016. Released 3 yrs ago (1/16/2016 UTC) at Starbucks at Stage and Kirby Whitten in Bartlett, Tennessee USA. Wild release notes: In Christmas bag with a few others.

In this exquisitely written memoir, poet Patrick Lane describes his raw and tender emergence at age sixty from a lifetime of alcohol and drug addiction. He spent the first year of his sobriety close to home, tending his garden, where he cast his mind back over his life, searching for the memories he'd tried to drown in vodka. Lane has gardened for as long as he can remember, and his garden's life has become inseparable from his own. A new bloom on a plant, a skirmish among the birds, the way a tree bends in the wind, and the slow, measured change of seasons invariably bring to his mind an episode from his eventful past. What the Stones Remember is the emerging chronicle of Lane's attempt to face those memories, as well as his new self—to rediscover his life. In this powerful and beautifully written book, Lane offers readers an unflinching and unsentimental account of coming to one's senses in the presence of nature.

Comments:

Rocky Basilisk
Fascinating autobiography and triumph of individual over adverse upbringing. Author likely loses many a reader with reliance on botanical references. Author's humanity and kindness towards the natural world inspire.
Whitegrove
If I could write, I would choose to write like this. Patrick Lane's writing is lyrical and winding and beautiful. I finished this the first time and immediately read it again. I've given away to many copies I have to order a few more so I always have one near. It's that beautiful.
Ynonno
DEPRESSING BUT HOPEFUL BOOK ABOUT RECOVERY FROM DRUG AND ALCOLHOL ADDICTION AND RETURN TO NORMAL, SOBER LIFE.
Faebei
"I circle my father's death for a means to get close. I remember my Uncle Jack pushing my head into my father's coffin. The taste of lipstick and powder will stay on my lips forever. Kiss him, he cried, Kiss your father goodbye." So Patrick Lane in What the Stones Remember. There is a cruel courage in how Lane dwells on the memory of his murdered father and voices pain and grief. In the breathtaking, breath giving tradition of Derek Jarman's Modern Nature, What the Stones Remember turns to nature and gardens for healing from the hurtful, painful wonder of life. With this savage, soothing book, Lane, fulfilling a promise he made in an early father poem, "Fathers and Sons," reaches "down into the heavy earth" and sings his father "back into the day," and himself free of the poisons of drugs and alcohol. What the Stones Remember is a lyrical masterpiece to be treasured by all recovering alcoholics, avid gardeners, and passionate lovers of Annie Dillard and Thoreau.

Andre Gerard.
Editor of Fathers: A Literary Anthology
Siatanni
I can't believe I'm the first reviewer to take a stab at WHAT THE STONES REMEMBER, A LIFE REDISCOVERED. Everyone I know is reading this book! It's especially good for people who are just undergoing recovery, those who will recognize and nod with wonder at the pain Lane describes at just waking up and experiencing the little things, the color of your bedroom walls, the feel of the cotton pillowcase under your cheek, as if for the first time, without the sheltering batting of cocaine or alcohol. He thinks of the American poet Weldon Kees who, fueled by despair and drink jumped off the Golden Gate Bridge in the early 1950s, and of Kees' famous zen riddle, "Whatever it is that a wound remembers/ After the healing ends."

Lane finds the courage to remember the years before he fell into heavy drinking, and what a dreary lot of memories he dredges up! Okay, there were some happy moments too--a sensuous description of lovemaking at age 16 with the girl who would become his first wife--but mostly he grew up in Canada, a misbegotten part of the world with more casual brutality, sexual violence, and abuse against childred than you will find in Ghana or Sierra Leone. For pocket money he sold himself to pedophiles, for a quarter here or a dollar there, allowing them to buy him forbidden ice cream sundaes in depressing town dessert joints. At another time he watches from between parked cars as three white men brutally rape and torture a native Indian woman. For Lane, youth is an unusual place, marked by the absence of his dad during World War II and by the remarkably hard-earned wisdom of a lovely mother, with a caustic wit which, who knows, might have contributed to Lane's own dexterity with words.

I don't like his poetry very much, and it's a shame that he feels he has to quote from it in this book, but as a memoirist he really shines. After getting out of the treatment clinic, he goes to work on his garden, like Candide, but even there memories of different things that happened to him sometimes leap up and assault his senses so that he'd do anything to have just one drink! And sometimes he finds bottles of vodka hidden around the house, and garden too. Malcolm Lowry probably said just as well and earlier to boot everything that Patrick Lane has to say about the sadnesses of Western Canada, the glittering allure of drink, and the repentance of women's arms, but Lowry (author of UNDER THE VOLCANO and one of Lane's literary heroes) has been gone a longtime, the victim of his own alcoholism, and Lane lives on, triumphantly speaking of a new marriage to another of Canada's notable literary figures, a woman who he calls "Lorna" here. Maybe her real name is Lorna too, but in any case you get the idea he's trying to protect the innocent and to lacerate only himself and his people.

I predict a long future for this book if only more people knew about it besides people in recovery.
INvait
This memoir by one of Canada's best-known poets follows Patrick Lane's first year of recovery from a lifetime of alcoholism, a recovery that unfolds almost entirely in his Vancouver Island garden. The narrative weaves between his present-tense garden and the struggle and brutality that was Lane's past. His poetic voice permeates his storytelling, compelling us to see how the honesty and enchantment of the natural world can save us from our nightmares, our addictions, our terrible losses - if only we will let it.

Originally published a year and a half ago in Canada as There Is a Season: A Memoir in a Garden, the book won the 2005 BC Award for Canadian nonfiction. It is not at all disingenuous for Lane to re-release his memoir under a new title - What the Stones Remember - as there really are two stories folded into the one book. This new title summons the story of Lane's turbulent past as a wayward child, an absentee father, a fledgling poet, a failed husband, a triumphant writer, and ultimately a recovering addict. We follow him deep into his personal history and come to understand, along with him, that it is a miracle he is still alive. This story is rich with personal intrigue, gossip, sentimentality and curiosity. I think it's rare that we look even into our own lives so intimately.

The second story is the simple unfolding of the seasons in his suburban garden, and it mirrors Lane's journey of recovery and self-redemption. His garden is his sanctuary and the midwife of his rebirth as a sane and sober person. He delves into the ecology of his garden with the same studied depth as he digs through his personal history. The carefully documented hours of observation are underscored by a book knowledge of plant and animal classification, behaviour and habitat.

This being said, Lane is first and foremost a poet, and his garden ramblings are never dry or dense. How can they be when he periodically unearths old vodka bottles in the woodpile or under a bush? Or when he stops to watch a hermit thrush dance and mourn beside its dead mate? Or sees his mother, long decades dead, kneeling in the corner under the plum tree?

What the Stones Remember contains equal parts beauty and horror. Patrick Lane describes a past that many people would be inclined to leave buried in the furrows of time. But in bringing forth the dead, the wounded, the lost, this poet carves a path of healing and new life.

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