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Download Nobody Said Not to Go: The Life, Loves, and Adventures of Emily Hahn fb2, epub

by Ken Cuthbertson

Download Nobody Said Not to Go: The Life, Loves, and Adventures of Emily Hahn fb2, epub

ISBN: 057119950X
Author: Ken Cuthbertson
Language: English
Publisher: Faber & Faber (May 1, 1998)
Pages: 383
Category: Arts & Literature
Subcategory: Biography
Rating: 4.8
Votes: 150
Size Fb2: 1111 kb
Size ePub: 1804 kb
Size Djvu: 1630 kb
Other formats: mbr mobi lit docx


Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and . Her love of writing led her to Manhattan, where she sold her first story to th. .

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Emily Hahn first challenged traditional gender roles in 1922 when she enrolled in the University of Wisconsin’s all-male College of Engineering, wearing trousers, smoking cigars, and adopting the nickname Mickey.

Considering that Emily Hahn wrote 52 books and countless articles and short stories-her career at the New . To recover, Hahn decided to move to London with her former male roommate, Loth

Considering that Emily Hahn wrote 52 books and countless articles and short stories-her career at the New Yorker alone spanned 68 years-and generated plenty of controversy both in her personal life as well as her writing, it's amazing that few people have heard of this unique woman. To recover, Hahn decided to move to London with her former male roommate, Loth.

Emily Hahn has become an obsession. I went to my public library and checked out everything they had by her - about 4 of her fifty-two books. Nobody Said Not to Go is a fabulous book and worth seeking out. I believe it is currently out-of-print and that is a shame. Cuthbertson paces this story well and keeps you interested. He also paints a real woman triumphs and faults.

Full recovery of all data can take up to 2 weeks! So we came to the decision at this time to double the download limits for all users until the problem is completely resolved. Thanks for your understanding! Progress: 6. 6% restored. Главная Nobody Said Not to Go: The Life, Loves, and Adventures of Emily Hahn. Nobody Said Not to Go: The Life, Loves, and Adventures of Emily Hahn. Cuthbertson Ken. Язык: english.

Emily Hahn first challenged traditional gender roles in 1922 when she enrolled in the University of Wisconsin’s all-male College of Engineering, wearing trousers, smoking cigars, and . Ken Cuthbertson is a journalist and historian.

Emily Hahn first challenged traditional gender roles in 1922 when she enrolled in the University of Wisconsin’s all-male College of Engineering, wearing trousers, smoking cigars, and adopting the nickname Mickey.

Ken Cuthbertson, Nobody Said Not to Go: The Life, Loves, and Adventures of Emily Hahn (Boston: Faber and Faber, 1998). Taras Grescoe Shanghai Grand: Forbidden Love and International Intrigue in a Doomed World. Works by Emily Hahn at Project Gutenberg. Works by or about Emily Hahn at Internet Archive.

With a rich understanding of social history and a keen eye for colorful details and amusing anecdotes, author Ken Cuthbertson brings to life a brilliant, unconventional woman who traveled fearlessly because nobody said not to go. Hahn wrote hundreds of acclaimed articles and short. Hahn wrote hundreds of acclaimed articles and short stories as well as fifty books in many genres, and counted among her friends Rebecca West, Ernest Hemingway, Dorothy Parker, James Thurber, Jomo Kenyatta, and Madame and General Chiang Kai-shek. Biographies Adventurers & Explorers. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate

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Emily Hahn led an amazing, uninhibited, and totally fascinating life. In this, the first biography of Emily Hahn, Canadian journalist Ken Cuthbertson explores the life, loves, and adventures of the woman known to her friends simply as "Mickey.

fascinating biography of journalist Emily Hahn. Publisher: Marshall Cavendish Corporation (September 2000). Before he is ready to go to sleep, Little Porcupine wants to hear-and tell-stories about the Big Porcupine in the Sky, the sun. Show more Show less. Travelled to Africa and Shanghai in the and. I read this book many years ago and was utterly inspired by Emily Hahn's adventures. Nobody Said Not to Go: The Life, Loves, and Adventures of Emily Hahn by Ken Cuthbertson.

Traces the life of the author and her travels around the world

Comments:

Delaath
I happened upon a book by Emily Hahn called Times and Places, which is a collection of essays she wrote for the New Yorker. I was amazed by her writing and her adventures in the 20s and 30s, and my her early trailblazing, opening up opportunities for gnerations of women. Went on to read China to me, again well written, as well as haunting, reading about the experience of being in occupied China during the war. The section of how she survived Hong Kong during the war is perhaps not for the squeamish, but survive she did and went on to become a successful writer and world traveler. This biography takes these stories and adds to them with interviews and research of the times and of her life. He is definitely a fan of hers, but is not afraid to mention some less than savory parts of her life or her mistakes. He does at times repeat himself, but that didn't bother me as much as it did others

While I enjoyed reading this bio, I think anyone who is interested in the writer should read her actual writing, whether its in the form of the books she authored, many of which have been back in print recently, or go to the NYer archive and check out some of her essays. She is indeed a splendid writer, and in many ways ahead of her time. Then come back and read this very readable, interesting and well written biography of her.
BroWelm
Considering that Emily Hahn wrote 52 books and countless articles and short stories--her career at the New Yorker alone spanned 68 years--and generated plenty of controversy both in her personal life as well as her writing, it's amazing that few people have heard of this unique woman. She was born in 1905, when women's place was in the home, so she found plenty of ways to shock people. In fact, she enjoyed doing it. Hahn took words like "no," "can't," and "shouldn't" as a personal challenge to prove that she could and she would. Without a doubt, Hahn was a remarkable woman who was clearly ahead of her time. Cuthbertson's well-done autobiography of this exotic one-time Shanghai resident allows us to enjoy a wild romp through Hahn's life story.

Even during girlhood, Hahn showed that a propensity to break rules and to write would shape her future. She majored in engineering, despite the unpopularity it caused her. After graduation, Hahn refused to marry. She had too many other things she wanted to do, and she freely admitted that she hated housework. After a stint as an engineer, Hahn worked as a waitress and then a tour guide in Santa Fe for a few years. In 1928, her parents bribed her to come back north and try again by offering to pay her way through graduate school. So, Hahn attended graduate school at Columbia University. While in New York, a friend asked her to cover a journalism assignment for him. Her career as a writer was launched.

Always living on the edge, Emily's next project was a satirical "how to" handbook on the art of seduction--certainly a subject nice young ladies should know nothing about! Hahn then moved in with a male friend, Davey Loth, and bought a Capuchin monkey. She loved to amuse herself by watching people's reactions as she went around the city with "Punk" proudly perched on her shoulder.

Despite seeming to be on the road to success, Hahn succumbed to the family propensity for depression and attempted suicide in 1929. That, however, was probably also on the list of requirements for an artistic temperament. To recover, Hahn decided to move to London with her former male roommate, Loth. Though she loved spending time in the British Museum reading room helping Loth with research for a book he was writing, she readily became bored with London and decided to visit her old friend Patrick Putnam, who was a Harvard-trained anthropologist now working in the Belgian Congo. Of course a young lady traveling alone to Africa raised many eyebrows, as did her shipboard drinking contests with Corsican soldiers. Once she arrived in Africa, the journey she endured to Patrick's village would have daunted even the heartiest male travelers.

Emily remained in the Belgian Congo for nearly two years, learning Swahili and paying for her living expenses by working as a nursing assistant at the hospital in Patrick's village. Naturally, her African experiences led to a book, which she called Congo Solo: Misadventures Two Degrees North.

After returning to London, Emily began an affair with the already-married Edwin Mayer --a founder of MGM Studios. When that relationship ended, she decided to put the past behind her by going abroad again. This time, she decided to try Shanghai, which was "the place to be" in the 1930s. Jobs were plentiful, and many foreigners were able to live a lifestyle they could only dream of back home. Shanghai was also China's cultural and intellectual center, which suited Hahn, as she became part one of the socially hip. One of the highlights of this period was the time she posed nude for Sir Victor Sassoon. Before the local gossips had finished wagging about this event, Hahn stunned everyone by beginning a relationship with a man who was not only married but Chinese. Interracial relationships were highly taboo, but Hahn felt drawn Sinmay Zau not only because he was forbidden, but because he was a poet, an intellectual, and a publisher. Unfortunately, he was also an opium addict, who initiated Emily's battle with the drug. Smoking opium, however, fit her concept of herself as an artist. She thought the drug was exotic, daring, and romantic.

Despite her opium addiction, her busy social life, and her scandalous affair, Hahn managed to remain highly productive during these years. She wrote for local English language publications and The New Yorker, she taught, and she worked on her next book, Affair. One of the more interesting series of articles she created during this period concerned a Chinese gentleman called Pan Heh-ven, who was based on Zau. Through Zau, Hahn gained an intimate view of Shanghainese life that few other outsiders could observe, or would dare to participate in.

Hahn enjoyed her notoriety, but to ensure that the gossips had enough material, she adopted Mr. Mills, a pet gibbon she often took around with her. The naughty Mr. Mills was not very popular with Hahn's neighbors, but she enjoyed the boost it gave her colorful persona.

In the fall of 1937, the Japanese took over Shanghai, threatening to put an end to Hahn's exotic escapades. She had just begun to write a book on the infamous Soong sisters, which became her most recognized work. She was excited about the project as it would be a reason to kick her opium habit and to break off her relationship with Zau. Because of the political situation, however, Hahn decided to actually marry Zau. Since he already had a wife, she would become a concubine. This move actually turned out to be less insane than it appeared to outsiders. Among several reasons, this strange union turned beneficial for her later, as being married to a Chinese allowed her to avoid being interned during the Japanese occupation of Hong Kong.

Following her "marriage" to Zau, Hahn went to Hong Kong to work on the Soong book, where she met 36-year-old British army intelligence officer Charles Boxer. Boxer was unhappily married to a wife who had been evacuated to Australia when he began an affair with Hahn. This was disgraceful enough behavior for an officer, but it became scandalous when he wanted to have a child with Emily. At age 35, Hahn assumed she might never get another chance, and she had been told by a Shanghai doctor that probably could not conceive. Since she had been told "no,"... well, by 1941 she was pregnant.

Just imagine the rumor mill: a former opium addict, a Chinaman's concubine, who goes around with a gibbon on her shoulder and smoking cigars, refuses to leave Japanese occupied Hong Kong, and who was now pregnant by a married British officer! Inarguably, Hahn was living life fully and on her own terms.

Hahn was teaching and writing in Hong Kong when baby Carola was born in October 1941. When the Japan attacked in December, it was too late to evacuate. After all the deprivations of war, Hahn returned to the States to discover that her bank account was flush with the royalties from The Soong Sisters and Mr. Pan. She was full of creative energy after her experiences. One of the first projects she completed was penning China to Me. Not everyone appreciated her honesty about her experiences or her views on China's political situation, but again she received mountains of publicity and provided ample fodder for drawing room gossips. She also became a regular contributor at The New Yorker. During this prolific outpouring, she was spinning out articles on a variety of subjects, earning $2,000 per article at a time when the average factory worker earned $1,700 per year. Not bad for a single mother who was only recently a half-starved, penniless refugee!

After the Japanese surrender in 1945, Boxer made his way to New York and married Hahn, but naturally their marriage was anything but ordinary. After the wedding, the family of three made their home at Boxer's family estate in England. While Boxer felt at home as a "country gentleman," burying himself in his research and working at his dream job as a Professor of Portuguese History and Literature at King's College at U of London, Hahn rapidly grew bored. After giving birth to baby Amanda in October 1948, she accepted her dream job on the staff of The New Yorker. She seems to have invented the "commuter marriage" as she divided her time between the two continents for the rest of her life.

For the next 40 years, Hahn indulged her natural curiosity by writing about everything, and she thrived on the stimulation of being a writer in New York City. In her work, as in her personal life, she sought to be unpredictable. In some ways her career was harmed because she moved so effortlessly, and frequently, among genres. As a result, editors did not know how to market her work and publishers seemed at a loss as to how to promote an Emily Hahn book, as her work could not be categorized. Readers, however, liked her eye for intriguing detail and her casual perspective on life in a convention-bound era. When she died in 1997, Hahn was 92 years old, still busily tapping out articles on her trusty typewriter.

Cuthbertson has done a fine job researching Hahn's life and making her story come to life in the pages of "Nobody Said Not to Go." The book is easy to read and inspires readers to explore Hahn's work. Was she simply born to be outrageous? Did declaring herself an "artistic personality" give her a license to do as she pleased? Does she deserve to rank among the best writers of her generation? As Hahn's work has been largely forgotten, the tantalizing answers are happily left for us to discover.
GAMER
I loved this book when I first bought it a few years ago and wanted to buy a copy for a friend who has lived a similarly exciting, untraditional, international life. I am not willing to give up mine. I saw that it is out of print so I paid the price to buy one from one of the non-Amazon sellers here.

There are other books about Emily Hahn's life, apparently including her own version as culled from her columns for the New Yorker. The reviews on that book aren't very good, but in this book Ken Cuthbertson did a fabulous job of capturing the excitement of her outrageus life and the sassiness of her personality as well as the amazingness (not a word but you get the idea) of her accomplishments as a woman living where and how she did many decades ahead of her time.

I mostly read murder mysteries and thrillers and it takes a lot for a biography to keep me reading until the end. This one did. Plus, how many books do we mow through and six months later not remember the whos or whys or wheres, whereas this one has stayed with me for several years. I wished I could have met Emily Hahn after reading this book.

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