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by Thomas P. Rausch

Download Catholics and Evangelicals: Do They Share a Common Future? fb2, epub

ISBN: 0809139863
Author: Thomas P. Rausch
Language: English
Publisher: Paulist Pr (November 1, 2000)
Pages: 178
Category: Catholicism
Subcategory: Bibles
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 948
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Catholics And Evangelicals book.

Catholics And Evangelicals book.

Rausch, Thomas P. Publication date. Catholic Church - Relations - Evangelicalism, Église catholique - Relations - Évangélisme, Catholic Church, Evangelicalism - Relations - Catholic Church, Évangélisme - Relations - Église catholique, Evangelicalism, Interfaith relations. New York : Paulist Press. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by ttscribe1. hongkong on May 4, 2018. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

A report on the new dialogue growing up between Catholics and Protestant evangelicals, with an honest summary of. .

A report on the new dialogue growing up between Catholics and Protestant evangelicals, with an honest summary of issues.

Publication: Downers Grove : InterVarsity Press, 2000Description: 178 . SBN: 0-8308-1566-X. Dewey: 28. 42 C363Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references and indexes. Subject: Католическая церковь - Отношение - Евангельские христиане, Catholic Church - Relations - Evangelicalism.

Catholics and Protestant evangelicals are today's two largest groups of Christians

A true work of understanding and charity. com User, April 6, 2001. This book was truly the result of what happens when people take their blinders off and look at each other objectively.

Together, let's build an Open Library for the World. Catholics and Evangelicals. August 1, 2019 History.

New York: Paulist, 2000. Centenary College of Louisiana. New York: Paulist, 2000.

After an overview of relations, Rausch commends an emerging generation less burdened by past .

After an overview of relations, Rausch commends an emerging generation less burdened by past prejudices and more willing to cooperate. The first local dialogue in the United States between Catholics and Evangelicals was established in 1987, sponsored by Fuller Theological Seminary and the Archdiocese of Los Angeles. 5 Since its beginning, the Los Angeles Committee has addressed issues of tension and common interest between the two communities, among them evangelization and the Hispanic community, Mary and the saints, the Evangelical-Roman.

Evangelicals and Catholics Together is a 1994 ecumenical document signed by leading Evangelical and Catholic scholars in the United States

Evangelicals and Catholics Together is a 1994 ecumenical document signed by leading Evangelical and Catholic scholars in the United States. The co-signers of the document were Charles Colson and Richard John Neuhaus, representing each side of the discussions

What can Catholics and evangelicals do together to promote greater common ground and more genuine and constructive discourse? Can Catholics and evangelicals make a positive difference for the American future? Since 2008 Georgetown University, in cooperation.

What can Catholics and evangelicals do together to promote greater common ground and more genuine and constructive discourse? Can Catholics and evangelicals make a positive difference for the American future? Since 2008 Georgetown University, in cooperation with Eastern University and other evangelical institutions, has convened a dialogue, Catholics and Evangelicals for the Common Good, to address these and related concerns. This symposium brought together participants in the dialogue to assess lessons learned, ways forward, and the impact of Catholics and evangelicals on the 2012 election.

Provides an overview of the history between Catholics and Evangelicals, giving an honest summary of the relationship between the two, and looks at stereotypes that must be overcome, examining areas of mutual concern and mutual ministry, while addressing two key points of difference: salvation and the role of the church.

Comments:

Zan
Contains all the information and dialogue necessary for Catholics and Evangelicals to come together and enjoy each other as Christians.
Wooden Purple Romeo
Editor Thomas Rausch is a Jesuit who is professor of Catholic Theology and department chair at Loyola Marymount University. HE wrote in the Foreword to this 2000 book, "The Evangelicals and Catholics Together documents... received the endorsement of no ecclesial bodies. The new patterns of cooperation between Catholics and evangelicals have been largely local and ad hoc... It would be irresponsible ... simply to ignore the theological discussion in all this. Doctrinal concerns are too important to both of our communities. This is why this book of essays is an important gift to both Catholics and evangelical Protestants. The authors have been intensely involved in Catholic-evangelical dialogue, and they take on the 'big' topics on which the two communities have significant disagreements: salvation, ecclesiology, authority, the sacraments, evangelism. There are no attempts here at an easy consensus. But there are serious... efforts to get past the long-standing pattern of talking past each other." (Pg. 2-3)

One essayist notes, "The Second Vatican Council brought with it a new way of doing business... And Evangelicals were watching. When the bishops wrote in the 'Dogmatic Constitution on the Church' that as they looked beyond the confines of the Roman Catholic Church they had identified in other places 'many elements of sanctification and of truth,' Evangelicals were pleased. When the bishops penned the 'Decree on Ecumenism' and admitted, perhaps for the first time, that 'men on both sides were to blame' for the separation which had occurred at the time of the Reformation, and that it was inappropriate to view those persons who were outside the Roman Catholic Church as in some way necessarily guilty of the sins of their forebears, Evangelicals were surprised. When... the bishops suggested that the appropriate title for believers who were not Roman Catholic was 'brothers'... Evangelicals decided that they needed to look more carefully at what was going on." (Pg. 23)

Rausch admits in an essay, "Catholics have often tended to stereotype Evangelicals and Pentecostals... they have tended to dismiss all Evangelicals as fundamentalists... Many ... were deeply offended when John Paul II in his remarks at the Fourth General Conference of Latin American Bishops... held at Santo Domingo in 1992, implicitly included them among the 'sects' which he characterized as acting like 'rapacious wolves,' devouring Latin American Catholics and 'causing division and discord' in Catholic communities." (Pg. 39) He also notes that "College campus ministers have objected that groups like Inter-Varsity Fellowship and Campus Crusade for Christ have often tended to work in competition with the historic churches and in fact are often anti-ecclesial, setting up independent fellowships, sometimes with non-denomination sacramental rituals." (Pg. 41)

Rausch observes about the ECT document, "Though theologically quite sophisticated, it tends to focus on those moral and social concerns shared by Catholic neo-conservatives and the religious right, among them opposition to abortion, euthanasia, pornography, and the idea that in areas of marriage, parenthood, and family, tolerance 'requires the promotion of moral equivalance between the normative and the deviant.'" (Pg. 47-48)

Another essayist points out, "Most Evangelicals... would not hesitate to claim Martin Luther (1483-1546) as their spiritual ancestor, and even as their spiritual prototype, although Luther himself would not have recognized their theology and would probably have rejected large parts of it. But Evangelicals are one with Luther on the question of justification by faith, and for them that is all that really matters. His sacramental theology... is simply overlooked or dismissed as a secondary matter." (Pg. 80)

This book will be of great interest to anyone studying Catholic/Protestant issues and dialogue.
Worla
Editor Thomas Rausch is a Jesuit who is professor of Catholic Theology and department chair at Loyola Marymount University. HE wrote in the Foreword to this 2000 book, "The Evangelicals and Catholics Together documents... received the endorsement of no ecclesial bodies. The new patterns of cooperation between Catholics and evangelicals have been largely local and ad hoc... It would be irresponsible ... simply to ignore the theological discussion in all this. Doctrinal concerns are too important to both of our communities. This is why this book of essays is an important gift to both Catholics and evangelical Protestants. The authors have been intensely involved in Catholic-evangelical dialogue, and they take on the 'big' topics on which the two communities have significant disagreements: salvation, ecclesiology, authority, the sacraments, evangelism. There are no attempts here at an easy consensus. But there are serious... efforts to get past the long-standing pattern of talking past each other." (Pg. 2-3)

One essayist notes, "The Second Vatican Council brought with it a new way of doing business... And Evangelicals were watching. When the bishops wrote in the 'Dogmatic Constitution on the Church' that as they looked beyond the confines of the Roman Catholic Church they had identified in other places 'many elements of sanctification and of truth,' Evangelicals were pleased. When the bishops penned the 'Decree on Ecumenism' and admitted, perhaps for the first time, that 'men on both sides were to blame' for the separation which had occurred at the time of the Reformation, and that it was inappropriate to view those persons who were outside the Roman Catholic Church as in some way necessarily guilty of the sins of their forebears, Evangelicals were surprised. When... the bishops suggested that the appropriate title for believers who were not Roman Catholic was 'brothers'... Evangelicals decided that they needed to look more carefully at what was going on." (Pg. 23)

Rausch admits in an essay, "Catholics have often tended to stereotype Evangelicals and Pentecostals... they have tended to dismiss all Evangelicals as fundamentalists... Many ... were deeply offended when John Paul II in his remarks at the Fourth General Conference of Latin American Bishops... held at Santo Domingo in 1992, implicitly included them among the 'sects' which he characterized as acting like 'rapacious wolves,' devouring Latin American Catholics and 'causing division and discord' in Catholic communities." (Pg. 39) He also notes that "College campus ministers have objected that groups like Inter-Varsity Fellowship and Campus Crusade for Christ have often tended to work in competition with the historic churches and in fact are often anti-ecclesial, setting up independent fellowships, sometimes with non-denomination sacramental rituals." (Pg. 41)

Rausch observes about the ECT document, "Though theologically quite sophisticated, it tends to focus on those moral and social concerns shared by Catholic neo-conservatives and the religious right, among them opposition to abortion, euthanasia, pornography, and the idea that in areas of marriage, parenthood, and family, tolerance 'requires the promotion of moral equivalance between the normative and the deviant.'" (Pg. 47-48)

Another essayist points out, "Most Evangelicals... would not hesitate to claim Martin Luther (1483-1546) as their spiritual ancestor, and even as their spiritual prototype, although Luther himself would not have recognized their theology and would probably have rejected large parts of it. But Evangelicals are one with Luther on the question of justification by faith, and for them that is all that really matters. His sacramental theology... is simply overlooked or dismissed as a secondary matter." (Pg. 80)

This book will be of great interest to anyone studying Catholic/Protestant issues and dialogue.

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