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by Joan Aruz,Elisabetta Valtz Fino

Download Afghanistan: Forging Civilizations along the Silk Road (Metropolitan Museum of Art Symposia) fb2, epub

ISBN: 0300179545
Author: Joan Aruz,Elisabetta Valtz Fino
Language: English
Publisher: Metropolitan Museum of Art (September 11, 2012)
Pages: 144
Category: History & Criticism
Subcategory: Art
Rating: 4.5
Votes: 675
Size Fb2: 1488 kb
Size ePub: 1422 kb
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Aruz, Joan, and Elizabetta Valtz Fino (2012). Map of the Silk Road Acknowledgments. Introduction Joan Aruz.

Aruz, Joan, and Elizabetta Valtz Fino (2012). This title is out of print. The symposium that was held in 2009 at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, on the occasion of the exhibition "Afghanistan: Hidden Treasures from the National Museum, Kabul," brought together an exceptional group of scholars responsible for the excavation and interpretation of the magnificent works on view in the show. At the Crossroads of Asia: A History of the National Museum of Afghanistan Omara Khan Massoudi. The Bronze Age World of Afghanistan Fredrik T. Hiebert.

Start by marking Afghanistan: Forging Civilizations along the Silk Road as Want to Read .

Start by marking Afghanistan: Forging Civilizations along the Silk Road as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Elisabetta Valtz Fino is curator in the Department of Near Eastern Art at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Fred Hiebert, Archaeology Fellow at the National Geographic Society, Washington, DC, who was the Project Director.

I should note that these contributions are dissimilar to those appearing in the Hiebert and Cambon (2008) catalog of the exhibition; the new chapters are longer, scientific treatments of a variety of topics

Fino, Elisabetta Valtz. Whitehouse, David, 1941-2013.

Fino, Elisabetta Valtz. Format of Material: Books. Map of the Silk Road - Introduction, Joan Aruz - At the crossroads of Asia : a history of the National Museum of Afghanistan, Omara Khan Massoudi - The Bronze Age world of Afghanistan, Fredrik T. Hiebert - Chronology: western, central, and east Asia after Alexander - Coins : "The great guides of the historian", Frank L. Holt

a b Afghanistan: Forging Civilizations Along the Silk Road, Joan Aruz, Elisabetta Valtz Fino, Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2012 p. 75. ^ Albentiis, Emidio De; Foglia, Alfredo (2009). Secrets of Pompeii: Everyday Life in Ancient Rome.

a b Afghanistan: Forging Civilizations Along the Silk Road, Joan Aruz, Elisabetta Valtz Fino, Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2012 p.

Items related to Afghanistan: Forging Civilizations Along the Silk Road. Joan Aruz is curator in charge and Elisabetta Valtz Fino is curator in the Department of Near Eastern Art at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

Items related to Afghanistan: Forging Civilizations Along the Silk Road. Afghanistan: Forging Civilizations Along the Silk Road (Metropolitan Museum of Art Symposia). ISBN 13: 9780300179545. ISBN 10: 0300179545 ISBN 13: 9780300179545. Publisher: Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2012. Joan Aruz is curator in charge and Elisabetta Valtz Fino is curator in the Department of Near Eastern Art at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

Автор: Aruz Название: Afghanistan - Forging Civilizations Along the Silk Road .

This book focuses on ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, Rome and Greece, offering a detailed exposition of each in turn through thematic spreads depicting many aspects of their cultures.

a b c Afghanistan: Forging Civilizations Along the Silk Road, Joan Aruz, Elisabetta Valtz Fino, Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2012 . 5. Begram Ivory and Bone Carvings (Electronic Cultural Atlas Initiative).

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From Attila to Charlemagne: Arts of the Early Medieval Period in the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2012. Textilreste aus awarischen Gräbern von Leobersdorf und ein Exkurs über gegessene Textilstrukturen an der Rückseite bronzener Riemenzungen. From Attila to Charlemagne: Arts of the Early Medieval Period in the Metropolitan Museum of Art. New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2000. Rodinkova, Vlasta and Aleksandr N. Egor’kov. Klad rannesrednevekovogo vremeni iz Sudzhi-Zamost’ia i sostav metalla ego artefaktov.

The symposium that was held in 2009 at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, on the occasion of the exhibition "Afghanistan: Hidden Treasures from the National Museum, Kabul," brought together an exceptional group of scholars responsible for the excavation and interpretation of the magnificent works on view in the show. The title of the exhibition, "Hidden Treasures," alludes to the bravery of our Afghan colleagues, who—upon witnessing the destruction of the National Museum and the subsequent attacks by the Taliban—protected their artistic heritage for twenty-five years, only revealing in 2003 that these treasures were safely stored in a secure bank vault. The exhibition and the symposium celebrate their "rediscovery," one of the great triumphs for cultural preservation of the twentieth century and a story recounted here in an essay on the history of the National Museum by its heroic director, Omara Khan Maddoudi.Afghanistan, standing at the crossroads of major trade routes, has a long and complex history. Its rich cultural heritage bears the imprint of many traditions, from Greece and Iran to the nomadic world of the Eurasian steppes and China. The essays in this volume concentrate on periods of great artistic development: the Bactrian Bronze Age and the eras following the conquests of Alexander the Great, with a special focus on the sites of Aï Khanum, Begram, and Tillya Tepe. These contributions—in response to the reappearance of the magnificent hidden treasures from Afghanistan and their exhibition—have shed new light on the significance of these works and have reinvigorated the discussion of the arts and culture of Central Asia.

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Joan Aruz and Elisabetta Valtz Fino (eds.), Afghanistan: Forging Civilizations along the Silk Road. The Metropolitan Museum of Art Symposia. New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2012. viii + 134 pp., 147 illustrations, table, chronological chart, and bibliography. ISBN: 9780300179545 and 9781588394521, paperback with end-flaps, listed at $35.00. This long-awaited set of symposium papers was published by The Metropolitan Museum of Art and distributed by Yale University Press (hence, the two ISBNs). The volume has ten contributions by well-known scholars, nine of whom who met at The Metropolitan Museum of Art on September 9, 2009 to discuss the background of a monumental exhibition, “Afghanistan: Hidden Treasures from the National Museum, Kabul,” during its last venue in the United States, in New York, June 23-September 20, 2009. The symposium was also titled “Afghanistan: Hidden Treasures from the National Museum, Kabul,” as was the accompanying catalog edited by Fredrick Hiebert and Pierre Cambon (Afghanistan: Hidden Treasures from the National Museum, Kabul, Washington DC: National Geographic, 2008). The catalog provides detailed background on the National Museum of Afghanistan, saving Afghanistan’s heritage, and documents artifacts from four major archaeological sites (Tepe Fullol, Aï Khanoum, Begram, and Tillya Tepe) from which the majority of the displayed objects were drawn. The artifacts were cataloged at the museum in Kabul (funds were provided by the National Endowment for the Humanities for three separate cataloging projects) then travelled from Kabul to Paris, where many of the objects were treated by French conservators before going on display at the Musée Guimet, Paris. The exhibition was also mounted at museums in Turin and Amsterdam before coming to the United States – Washington, DC, San Francisco, Houston, and New York City (the US portion of the exhibition was also funded a substantial grant from by the National Endowment for the Humanities to the National Geographic Society). Afterward, it traveled to museums in Ottawa, London, and Oslo, and is currently in Queensland, Australia with scheduled venues in Sydney and Perth.

The symposium that was held in 2009 at The Metropolitan Museum of Art (MMA) in New York, on the occasion of the exhibition brought together an exceptional group of scholars responsible for the excavation and interpretation of the magnificent works on view in the show. The partial title of the exhibition, “Hidden Treasures,” refers to the bravery of Afghan colleagues, who protected their nation’s archaeological and art heritage for twenty-five years, only revealing in 2003 that these treasures were safely stored. The exhibition and the symposium celebrate the “rediscovery” of these world-class objects.

The MMA and Joan Aruz are especially qualified to mount the exhibition and organize the related symposium. Aruz is currently Curator in Charge, Department of Ancient Near Eastern Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. In 1989, she was appointed Assistant Curator and, in 1995, Associate Curator. In 1999, Dr. Aruz was appointed Acting Associate Curator in Charge of the Department of Ancient Near Eastern Art. And in July 2001, she was named Acting Curator in Charge and then, in February 2002, Curator in Charge of the Department of Ancient Near Eastern Art. Aruz; and Ronald Wallenfels edited Art of the First Cities The Third Millennium B.C. from the Mediterranean to the Indus (New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2003). Joan Aruz, Ann Farkas, and Elisabetta Valtz Fino edited The Golden Deer of Eurasia: Perspectives on the Steppe Nomads of the Ancient World: The Metropolitan Museum of Art Symposia (New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2007) which focused on an exhibition, “The Golden Deer of Eurasia: Scythian and Sarmatian Treasures from the Russian Steppes” (2000–2001). Elisabetta Valtz Fino is curator in the Department of Near Eastern Art at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Fred Hiebert, Archaeology Fellow at the National Geographic Society, Washington, DC, who was the Project Director for all three NEH cataloging grants (Bactrian gold, historic-era objects and prehistoric collections) has been the guest curator for all of the venues for the traveling exhibition. Previously, he was Robert H. Dyson chair of archaeology at the University of Pennsylvania and assistant curator of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology before joining the National Geographic Society in 2003.

Ten chapters are augmented by a very useful “Bibliography” (pp. 122-133) with 259 entries, mostly in English, but also French, Russian, German, and Italian (the non-English language entries are not translated into English), as well as “Photograph and Illustration Credits” (pg. 134). Nearly all of the 147 illustrations are in color. There is no index. I should note that these contributions are dissimilar to those appearing in the Hiebert and Cambon (2008) catalog of the exhibition; the new chapters are longer, scientific treatments of a variety of topics. Two parts of the symposia volume are valuable resources, a map and a chronological chart. “Afghanistan and the Silk Road” (pp. vi-vii) is a two-page color map spanning the area from the British Isles to Korea and has a detailed inset map at a greater scale. “Chronology: Western, Central, and East Asia after Alexander” (pp. 28-29) provides a chart showing the major cultures and some of the rulers of Mesopotamia, Iran, Bactria, Gandhara, North-central India, East-central India, China, and Korea as well as the Roman Empire that are discussed by the contributors. In reality, the chronologies span a maximum of 550 BC-AD 668 (the Achaemenid Empire to the Korean Silla dynasty).

Joan Aruz wrote a salient “Introduction” to the symposium (pp. 2-5, 12 figures, 1 endnote) in which she provided background on the exhibition and on Dr. Massoudi, pointing out that this new volume is more than a scholarly treatise. She also reviews the contents of the ten subsequent chapters. Omara Khan Massoudi, Director General of Museums in Afghanistan and Director of the National Museum of Afghanistan, Kabul, who contributed “At the Crossroads of Asia: A History of the National Museum of Afghanistan” (pp. 6-15, 12 figures), which was presented was presented as Friends of Inanna Lecture on June 17, 2009 and has been incorporated into the current volume. There is some similarity to his written contribution in the Hiebert and Cambon (2008) catalog, but provides more of a history of the museum founded in 1924 and relocated several times over the years. The long-term research by the Délégation Archéologique Françoise en Afghanistan (DAFA) in mostly Buddhist sites is recounted, and he discussed the Soviet invasion in 1979, subsequent looting of collections in Kabul, Hadda, and Jalalabad during the occupation, the civil war that followed, and the Taliban era – the museum in Kabul was on the front line between factions. On a happier note, he recounts how the majority of collections were hidden and survived. Before and after images of the museum in Kabul depict the destruction and resurrection of that facility and the roles played by Afghan conservators, key holders (curators), and the National Geographic Society.

Fredrik T. Hiebert (Archaeology Fellow, National Geographic Society, Washington, DC) contributed “The Bronze Age World of Afghanistan” (pp. 16-27, 13 figures, 31 endnotes) provides a very up-to-date assessment of the Bronze Age in Central Asia and particularly in Afghanistan. In a chapter very different from his own in the Hiebert and Cambon (2008) catalog. In the symposium volume he discussed the history of research, focused on major sites and artifacts, and provided a valuable chronological chart (p. 25) emphasizing eastern Iran, Afghanistan, and northwestern Pakistan. Frank L. Holt is Professor, Department of History, University of Houston, who is an acknowledged expert on Hellenism in Asia and related numismatics. His contribution “Coins: “The Great Guide of the Historian” (pp. 30-41, 13 figures, 1 table, 25 endnotes), emphasized the information that coinage can revel about the Greco-Bactrian Kingdom, their creators of the coins, Hellenistic Bactria, Greek script, and errors in coin dies. Paul Bernard is a member of the French Institute, Paris; former Director of the French Archaeological Delegation in Afghanistan (Délégation Archéologique Françoise en Afghanistan) is a member of the research team “Hellénisme et Civilisations Orientales,” EN SCNRS, Paris. His chapter, “Aï Khanoum: A Greek Colony in Post-Alexandrian Central Asia, or How to be Greek in an Oriental Milieu” (pp. 42-53, 18 figures, 45 endnotes), differs from his contribution to the Hiebert and Cambon (2008) catalog. He directed much of the excavation and object studies at the Greek city of Aï Khanoum on the Oxus River in the 1960s and 1970s. Sobering color pictures from 1978 and 1990s illustrates the pillaging of that site during Afghanistan’s time of troubles. The city plan, architecture, stone sculpture, reconstructions, the use of Corinthian capitals, and a unique sundial are considered.

David Whitehouse, Senior Scholar, The Corning Museum of Glass, Corning, New York, wrote “The Glass from Begram” (pp. 54-63, 14 figures, 45 endnotes). He noted that the exhibition has 18 of the ca. 180 glass vessels from the Begram excavations conducted by DAFA, takes issue with two statements in the exhibition catalog, and discussed the production of glass in the Roman Empire. The majority was produced between AD 50 and 125 but 26 objects of the 180 were not from the Roman world and he considered potential Swiss and Indian sources and settles on a date of ca. AD 100 when the Begram corpus was concealed. Sanjyot Mehendale is a Lecturer, Department of Near Eastern Studies, and Vice Chair, Center for Buddhist Studies at the University of California, Berkeley, who has conducted primary research on “The Begram Carvings: Itinerancy and the Problem of ‘Indian’ Art” (pp. 64-77, 19 figures, 26 endnotes). This chapter is a portion of her investigations (funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities). She also contributed a different article on Begram to the Hiebert and Cambon (2008) catalog. Begram (Alexandria ad Caucasum) was an important commercial center during the Kushan dynasty when the collection was concealed. In addition to glass and other elite artifacts, Indianesque ivory and bone carved panels used to decorate furniture were recovered from the DAFA excavations. She detailed the incredibly complex artwork on the panels and hair combs, much involving depictions of voluptuous women, and compared these materials to Gandharan and Mathuran art of the Kushan period. Jane Hickman is the Editor of Expedition magazine and Special Assistant to the Director for Museum Programs, University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, who prepared the chapter “Bactrian Gold: Jewelry Workshop Traditions at Tillya Tepe” (pp. 78-87, 16 figures, 23 endnotes). She documented the recovery of the Tillya Tepe gold by Viktor Sarianidi in 1978 but focused on the creation of jewelry from sheet and cast gold, adorned with semi-precious stones (turquoise and carnelian), amber, mother of pearl, and pearls – but not lapis lazuli, an azure-blue stone that comes from one source in Afghanistan. The objects produced, including pendants, earrings, finger rings, bracelets, plaques, and buckles, are documented.

Henri-Paul Francfort is Director of Research, Archéologie de l ’Asie Centrale, Maison René Ginouvès, Nanterre and authored “Tillya Tepe and Its Connections with the Eurasian Steppes” (pp. 88-102, 20 figures, 89 endnotes). The art styles represented in the jewelry and other objects from the Tillya Tepe graves were reviewed in a “brief and sketchy presentation of a large topic” (p. 99) but he does convey the blending of steppe nomadic cultural symbols and parallels with Sarmatian, Parthian, and Chinese Xiongnu societies. Sir John Boardman is Emeritus Lincoln Professor of Classical Art and Archaeology, Beazley Archive, University of Oxford who contributed “Tillya Tepe: Echoes of Greece and China” (pp. 102-111, 12 figures, 17 endnotes) as the Wilkinson Lecture at MMA on September 9. He documented examples of Chinese and Greek symbols mixed with Central Asian elements in the Tillya Tepe art; for example, a winged Aphrodite has an Indian Subcontinent bindi (beauty mark) on her forehead, there are divinities wearing Chinese garb, as well as depictions of Divine Horses. Denise Patry Leidy is Curator, Department of Asian Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York and wrote the essay “Links, Missing and Otherwise: Tillya Tepe and East Asia” (pp. 112-121, 10 figures, 29 endnotes). Chinese and Chinese-inspired artifacts, particularly jewelry, in the form of seals, buckles, plaques, and a collapsible crown were documented. She noted that there are striking parallels in the fabrication and decoration of the crown to 4th century AD headdresses from Liaoning Province, China and 6th century AD from the Silla dynasty in Korea.

The research on the exhibitions objects and other artifacts demonstrates that Afghanistan, situated at the crossroads of major trade routes, has a long, rich, and complex history. The emphasis in this volume is on the Bactrian Bronze Age and the eras following the conquests of Alexander the Great, with a special focus on the sites of Aï Khanum, Begram, and Tillya Tepe. The ten essays add much detailed information to the objects in the exhibition and do not replicate the written contribution in the Hiebert and Cambon (2008) catalog. Afghanistan: Forging Civilizations along the Silk Road is a valuable resource and an essential companion to the exhibition catalog, both of which help the reader understand the history, culture, and art of Central Asia. Anyone interested in Central Asian cultures, scholars of members of the public, would enjoy this volume. It is not too technical and is well-written and edited. This thoughtful volume is, of course, available from Amazon.com.

Readers may also be interested in “Comparative Review: Recent Exhibitions and Studies on Middle Asia,” an assessment of five books, including Hiebert and Cambon (2008) and Aruz et al. The Golden Deer of Eurasia: Perspectives on the Steppe Nomads of the Ancient World: Amazon.com, July 13, 2012. http://www.amazon.com/review/R2BVI7ZEQW0PVD
Pipet
This handsome edited volume is a brief but extremely useful introduction to the archaeological importance of Afghanistan as the crossroads of civilizations, where the cultures of the Middle East (mainly Iran), Central Asia, China and India all converged and intermingled. The cultural and archaeological riches of Afghanistan remain poorly known in the west due to decades of war and political instability. Joan Aruz's edited volume is valuable in providing a series of essays that highlight some of the key converging cultural influences that shaped the history of this fascinating region. A useful introductory essay by Fredrik Hiebert lays out the broad outlines of the Bronze Age archaeology of Afghanistan, showing that this area has been a meeting ground of cultures for over 5000 years. Other well written and beautifully illustrated essays focus on specific kinds of material culture such as Greco-Bactrian coins, Hellenistic-Roman ancient glass,the magnificent Indian-influenced carved ivories from Bagram, and the elaborate gold metalwork of the 1st centuries BC-AD steppe nomads; these chapters introduce us to true masterpieces that are little known in the west.
One of the best features of this book is its success in explaining and illustrating complex aspects of archaeology in ways that are clear to the educated non-specialist. Every reader will come away from this book seeing Afghanistan and its deep history of civilization through new eyes.

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